taxes

401(K) 2012, flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas Department of Revenue released tax tables on Tuesday that designate how much income employers should withhold from employee paychecks. The policy is the result of the tax increase that was recently passed by state lawmakers.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

For two days in a row, Kansas lawmakers have canceled tax votes before they even started. House leaders delayed and then canceled debate Wednesday on a plan to reinstate a third income tax bracket and raise tax rates. The bill also would have reinstated income taxes for hundreds of thousands of business owners.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File Photo

Kansas lawmakers could take a crack at a new tax proposal as soon as Wednesday, after a previous plan faltered. The new, larger proposal would raise about a billion dollars over two years by rolling back income tax cuts approved in 2012.

The bill's chances are uncertain. Republican Senate Vice President Jeff Longbine says there are factions that are sharply divided on the size of a potential tax increase.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

The state of Kansas didn’t collect as much in taxes as expected last month.

However, the state is still ahead for the current fiscal year.

The Department of Revenue reported that the state collected nearly $425 million in taxes in March.

Total tax collections were nearly $12 million below expectations for the month. State sales tax receipts were $2.3 million more than anticipated while individual income tax receipts were $11.1 million below expectations for March.

The shortfall ends the state’s four-month streak of tax collections that exceeded expectations.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas lawmakers are wrestling with a budget deficit and looking at a wide range of tax proposals to help cover the shortfall. A House committee considered the merits of a flat tax Monday, but the bills don’t seem to have much support.

The plans would eliminate tax brackets, so there would only be one Kansas income tax rate. One bill would set that at 3.9 percent, the other at 5 percent.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

At a time when lawmakers are considering tax increases to help balance the budget, a proposal in the Kansas Senate would make it more difficult to raise taxes.

The proposed constitutional amendment would require a two-thirds vote by lawmakers for any tax increase, and it would cap state spending and revenue growth. To overcome that cap would require a public vote.

Republican Sen. Ty Masterson says the public should have more say when it comes to tax increases.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

Editor's note: This post was updated at 5:18 p.m.

Kansas tax receipts came in about $37 million above estimates in February, chipping away at the state’s budget deficit.

The Kansas Budget Office on Wednesday reported about $331.5 million in tax receipts for the month, which was about 13 percent higher than projected revenue. Tax revenues were up about 9 percent compared to February 2016.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

A tax and budget debate fizzled in the Kansas Senate Thursday, before it had even started. As Stephen Koranda reports, the situation reveals just how divided lawmakers have become as they work to solve the state's budget crisis.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service

A Kansas Senate committee has advanced a bill that would repeal an income tax exemption for more than 300,000 business owners. That sends the proposal to the full Senate for consideration. The plan would also increase income tax rates overall.

Republican Sen. Julia Lynn supported the measure because she said the Legislature needs to make some progress on tax issues.

“This is a situation that has been floundering for four years. Although it might not be the best bill that’s put forward, it’s the beginning of a process,” Lynn said.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas Governor Sam Brownback released on Wednesday a wide-ranging plan for fixing the state’s budget shortfall. It would take money from the highway fund, raise some taxes and overhaul the funding system for children’s programs. It would also take longer to pay off a shortfall in the state's pension plan, KPERS.

Jim McLean, of the Kansas News Service, spoke with Kansas Public Radio's Stephen Koranda about the budget plan and how lawmakers are reacting.

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