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Gov. Sam Brownback is taking some budget options off the table for now in the face of sagging revenue numbers.

Kansas tax collections were more than $60 million short of expectations over the last three months. Brownback told reporters today that he won’t push for tax increases. He also isn’t considering mid-year budget cuts.

“I’m really not looking at allotments. We’ll try to figure a way through it another way, and I think we’ll be able to,” Brownback says.

Tax revenues in Kansas were $30 million below estimates for the month of August.

The state’s revenue numbers were dragged down by large tax refunds given to companies as part of economic development programs.

Secretary of Revenue Nick Jordan says the economic development programs are considered when writing the estimates, but this month included especially large refunds.

401(K) 2012, flickr Creative Commons

Kansans who owe back taxes to the state should consider paying them in the next few weeks.

The state is waiving interest and penalties on back taxes, starting Tuesday through Oct. 15.

The amnesty program is available to Kansans who owe individual and business tax debt that accrued before Dec. 31, 2013. The taxes must be repaid in full.

Officials with the Kansas Department of Revenue estimated the tax amnesty program could bring in up to $30 million.

Stephen Koranda file photo

An amnesty program for Kansans behind on their taxes will start next month. The goal is to bring in tax dollars that otherwise the state may not easily collect.

The revenue department has now posted details online and will begin accepting applications Sept. 1.

Kansas Department of Revenue spokeswoman Jeannine Koranda says only tax debt accrued before the end of 2013 is eligible for amnesty.

Ervins Strauhmanis, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas is wrapping up the first month of the new fiscal year on a sour note. The state’s tax receipts in July came in just shy of expectations. Over the month, total tax collections in Kansas were short by just about 1 percent, or nearly $4 million.

401(K) 2012, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas taxpayers who owe personal or business back taxes accrued before December 2013 have the opportunity to clear their debt without having to pay interest and penalties on the amount owed.

The Tax Amnesty Program applies to income, estate, sales, liquor and other taxes. Kansas Department of Revenue spokesperson Jeannine Koranda says taxpayers must have an approved application and pay the debt between September 1 and October 15.

Ervins Strauhmanis, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas is kicking off a new fiscal year Wednesday. The state wrapped up last fiscal year with tax collections coming in $22 million below estimates in June. State lawmakers didn't plan on a big savings account in this new fiscal year, and that makes the monthly revenue numbers critical.

Kansas lawmakers cut taxes several years ago. This year, they raised taxes and made cuts to balance the budget, but those changes still leave a state savings account estimated at under $100 million at the end of our new fiscal year.

Stephen Koranda file photo

Kansas already had the ninth-most regressive tax system in the nation, according to the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy.

The tax increase signed last week by Gov. Sam Brownback to balance the budget and end the longest legislative session in state history will make the system less fair to low- and middle-income Kansans, said Matt Gardner, executive director of the nonpartisan think tank based in Washington, D.C.

Stephen Koranda file photo

Kansas legislators aren't quite done with their work for the year because they inadvertently enacted two conflicting versions of a new law aimed at holding down local property taxes.

House Speaker Ray Merrick's office said Friday that legislators will reconvene June 26 to pass a bill addressing the problem. Spokeswoman Rachel Whitten described it as a technical fix.

Legislators already were scheduled to have a brief adjournment ceremony that day.

Dave Ranney, Heartland Health Monitor

When the 2015 legislative session started in January, public health advocates had reason to be optimistic they could reach some of their most ambitious goals.

The Kansas Hospital Association was ramping up efforts to expand Medicaid coverage to about 100,000 uninsured Kansans with the political implications of the 2014 election over.

Newly re-elected Gov. Sam Brownback had proposed to almost triple the state cigarette tax — a prospect that won quick support from groups that fight cancer and heart disease.