Thanksgiving

Abigail Beckman / KMUW

The Union Rescue Mission and the Wichita Police Department on Tuesday delivered holiday meals to local families in need. It's part of a 13-year partnership between the department and the shelter.

Nearly 100 cardboard boxes lined the cafeteria tables Tuesday morning at Wichita's Union Rescue Mission, an emergency shelter and job training center for men. Inside each box was a frozen turkey, bread, pie, canned goods and garnishes, all to be delivered to local families. 

This year, Officer Brent Johnson with the WPD organized the delivery process.

Carla Eckels / KMUW

The cooks are in their kitchens preparing food for a tasty Thanksgiving meal with turkey and all the trimmings.

For nearly 30 years, local vegan expert Diane Waltner has left turkey off her menu. She's the organizer of the Vegetarian and Animal Rights Meetup groups in Wichita.

Recently, Waltner welcomed KMUW’s Carla Eckels into her kitchen where she was gathering items to prepare a popular vegan side dish.

Johnny / flickr Creative Commons

The Wichita Police Department is partnering with the Union Rescue Mission to deliver Thanksgiving meals to families in need.

Police officers will deliver boxes of food to 100 families around Wichita identified as being in need. The food—including turkey and fixings for Thanksgiving dinner--is collected by the Union Rescue Mission, an evangelical Christian ministry that provides shelter and other services to homeless men.

Michael F., flickr Creative Commons

Beginning Wednesday, portable traffic signs will be placed in high-volume shopping areas in Wichita to remind people to be aware of the possibility of increased incidents of theft and vandalism during the holiday season.

The portable traffic message signs--often seen in construction zones and throughout the city's shopping areas--will warn shoppers to “Hide Your Items, Take your Keys, Lock Your Vehicle."

(Jack Amick/Flickr)

Mike Berners-Lee may not be an expert on the American Thanksgiving. A native of the UK, he’s never actually had the pleasure of experiencing one. But as one of the world’s leading researchers on the carbon footprint of—well—everything (he even wrote a book subtitled “The Carbon Footprint of Everything”), he’s plenty familiar with the impacts of the foods that star in the traditional Thanksgiving Day spread.

Courtesy Dianne Waltner

This Thanksgiving, vegans and vegetarians in Wichita are finding savory alternatives to turkey.

Local vegetarian and vegan expert Dianne Waltner hasn't eaten meat in more than 25 years. Waltner says tofurkey, instead of turkey, is an old standby that she likes--but some don’t. She says other options include a holiday plant-based roast that comes with gravy, as well as a cranberry-hazelnut roast in a puff pastry.

"That is really wonderful!" she says. "That's one that we are going to be having for Thanksgiving."

Cheap Thanksgiving Turkey Despite Bird Flu

Nov 24, 2015
Jeffrey Remick, flickr Creative Commons

Despite the bird flu epidemic that devastated Midwest turkey farmers this spring, the price of a turkey this Thanksgiving could be a little cheaper than last year.

The USDA’s most recent numbers show that this year’s turkeys are ringing up one cent less per pound. That’s a shock given the bird flu outbreak that tore through flocks in Minnesota and Iowa this spring.

John Anderson, chief economist at the American Farm Bureau Federation, says avian influenza hit a select group of farmers.

Pawel Loj, flickr Creative Commons

Ahead of the holiday, 1500 Thanksgiving food boxes are set to be given away Saturday by a church in west Wichita.

Central Community Church will open up their parking lot for motorists to pick up Thanksgiving dinner. Last year the church distributed a thousand boxes--this year, even more. Missions Pastor Aaron Varner says it’s a way for the church to be a blessing to the community, and everyone is welcome.

Thanksgiving: A Time For Food, Family And Myths

Nov 26, 2014
Sean Sandefur

This piece originally aired Nov. 26, 2014.

Families across the country all have different traditions for Thanksgiving. It could be a special recipe for cranberry sauce or an honorary turkey carver.

In many schools, you can also count on hearing the story of the First Thanksgiving—a harvest celebration shared by pilgrims and native populations nearly 400 years ago. KMUW’s Sean Sandefur looks at the history of this holiday and has this report.

laurieofindy / Flickr / Creative Commons

During the past few years, the holiday shopping season has undergone a dramatic transformation.

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