University of Kansas

Heartland Health Monitor

A contract dispute has ended a University of Kansas research center’s more than 30-year collaboration with the state’s community mental health centers--and that has several mental health providers lashing out at officials in the administration of Republican Gov. Sam Brownback. Heartland Health Monitor’s Jim McLean explains the history behind the growing controversy.

KDADS

A contract dispute between a state agency and a research center at KU could affect the quality of care at community mental health centers across Kansas.

What appears at first blush to be little more than a contract dispute between a state agency and a University of Kansas research center is actually much more than that.

The state’s failure to renew a contract with the KU Center for Mental Health Research and Innovation is another assault on the state’s mental health system, according to the directors of several community mental health centers.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Gov. Sam Brownback is cutting most state agencies 4 percent to balance the Kansas budget for next year.

Lawmakers approved an unbalanced budget that required the governor to make almost $100 million in spending reductions to comply with the state Constitution. Brownback’s budget director, Shawn Sullivan, says the governor exempted some agencies and K-12 schools.

Stephen Koranda

Gov. Sam Brownback is considering a budget plan that requires him to make spending cuts. Brownback says he has not yet decided if he’ll veto a provision in the budget affecting the University of Kansas and Kansas State University. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, the budget item says spending cuts should hit those schools harder than other universities.

Tristan Bowersox / Flickr Creative Commons

As incidents of sexual violence on college campuses draw greater scrutiny, a lawsuit filed against KU is taking a novel legal approach.

Most civil lawsuits filed by sexual assault victims allege violations of the federal sex discrimination law. This one, however, was brought by an alleged victim’s parents. It claims KU violated the Kansas Consumer Protection law by misrepresenting its dorms as safe and secure.

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran brought the nation’s top health leader on aging to Kansas today for an overview on the latest medical research on Alzheimer’s disease.

Moran and Dr. Richard Hodes, the director of the National Institute on Aging, visited Kansas City-area laboratories focused on aging research. Their stops included tours of the University of Kansas Alzheimer’s Disease Center (ADC) and the Hoglund Brain Imaging Center.

The senator also hosted a forum on the state of Alzheimer’s Disease Research with KU faculty, students, researchers and Alzheimer’s advocates.

Wikipedia

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback has endorsed Florida Sen. Marco Rubio in the race for the Republican presidential nomination. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, Kansas Republicans will pick presidential candidates in the March 5 caucus.

In a statement, Brownback called Rubio a “true conservative who can unite the party.”

Stephen Koranda / KPR

The University of Kansas is embarking on a major construction project on the Lawrence campus. The Central District plan includes educational facilities, housing and a new student union. KU says it’s a needed update, but lawmakers are raising concerns about the project and have taken steps that could punish KU.

In the heart of the KU campus in Lawrence, excavators are digging through piles of concrete and twisted metal. This rubble used to be old student apartment housing, but a new science facility is planned for this spot.

Jim McClean / Heartland Health Monitor

A bill that would prohibit minors from using commercial tanning beds that was stopped two years ago appears to be on its way to passing out of a Kansas House committee.

The bill appears to have the votes to pass out of the House Health and Human Services Committee despite testimony against it from Joseph Levy.

Levy is a lobbyist for the tanning industry. He says the American Cancer Society and other supporters of the bill are overstating the dangers of indoor tanning.

“The case that’s been made goes well beyond the facts," Levy says.

jphilipg, flickr Creative Commons

An earlier version of this story ran Feb. 9 during All Things Considered.

Officials from the University of Kansas are defending their decision to seek bonds outside of the state for a construction project. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, KU officials appeared before both Senate and House committees yesterday.

KU Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little told legislators that the new housing and science facilities are badly needed. She says they sought out the public-private partnership as a way to complete the project without Kansas tax dollars.

Pages