University of Kansas

Stephen Koranda

The Kansas Board of Regents has selected Dr. Doug Girod to be the next chancellor of the University of Kansas. Girod has been serving as the head of the KU Medical Center for the last four years.

The regents held a special meeting in Lawrence Thursday to make the announcement.

“Dr. Girod is the right person for this time of transition. His 23 years of service are a testament to Dr. Girod’s love and commitment to KU," said Regents Chair Zoe Newton. "He will honor KU’s traditions and history while leading this great university into the future."

University of Kansas School of Medicine

Citing a growing need for nurses—especially in rural Kansas—the University of Kansas School of Nursing is expanding to Salina.

If nurses are trained in a rural area, they’re more likely to work in a rural area. Sally Maliski, Dean of the KU School of Nursing, says that’s the idea behind the Salina campus.

“Well, it provides an opportunity to get a high-quality education in their home areas, thereby being more likely to stay in those rural areas to practice,” Maliski says.

Mike Sherry / KCPT's Flatland

With the infusion of $10 million in philanthropic support, two of the region’s largest medical centers have established four high-level research positions aimed at making Kansas City an international hub in the fight against pediatric cancers.

Children’s Mercy Hospital and The University of Kansas Cancer Center announced the new endowed chairs Monday evening at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research.

“There are very few causes in our community that touch people’s hearts like children and cancer,” said Dr. Roy Jensen, director of the cancer center.

Hugo Phan / KMUW/File photo

The Kansas Board of Regents on Wednesday approved policies for how the state's six public universities will implement a state law allowing people to carry concealed guns into campus buildings starting July 1.

SARAH MULLINAX

A University of Kansas scientist has been named one of the first recipients of an $825,000 fellowship for her work in developing a protein designed to thwart antibiotic resistance.

University of Kansas Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little announced on Thursday that she will step down next summer.

Gray-Little has led the school since 2009, when she became the first woman and the first African-American to serve as KU chancellor.

In a message to campus students and staff, Gray-Little said she’s proud of the school's accomplishments during her tenure, including the Far Above fundraising campaign, which raised $1.6 billion to help pay for scholarships, faculty and new buildings.

Universities in Kansas have been taking steps to absorb state funding cuts. As Stephen Koranda reports, the University of Kansas and Kansas State University are adopting different approaches.

KU announced this week that there would be positions left unfilled and targeted budget cuts, including some significant reductions to certain programs. At K-State, the strategy is a little different: Spokesperson Jeff Morris says K-State officials gave all departments an equal cut of just under 4 percent.

J. Schafer, Kansas Public Radio

Leaders at the University of Kansas have been working on ways to absorb more than $10 million in state budget cuts. On Wednesday, the Lawrence campus announced more than $1 million in targeted spending reductions. KU Provost Neeli Bendapudi says the goal was to avoid staff reductions and minimize the impact on students.

“It’s obviously not an easy thing to do, but we tried to look at everything that we could do to keep the core academic function of the university as protected as possible,” Bendapudi says.

Heartland Health Monitor

A contract dispute has ended a University of Kansas research center’s more than 30-year collaboration with the state’s community mental health centers--and that has several mental health providers lashing out at officials in the administration of Republican Gov. Sam Brownback. Heartland Health Monitor’s Jim McLean explains the history behind the growing controversy.

KDADS

A contract dispute between a state agency and a research center at KU could affect the quality of care at community mental health centers across Kansas.

What appears at first blush to be little more than a contract dispute between a state agency and a University of Kansas research center is actually much more than that.

The state’s failure to renew a contract with the KU Center for Mental Health Research and Innovation is another assault on the state’s mental health system, according to the directors of several community mental health centers.

Pages