voter id

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

A Kansas judge has ordered Secretary of State Kris Kobach to notify thousands of people who hadn't provided documents proving their citizenship that they will be allowed to vote for all offices in the November election.

Shawnee County District Judge Larry Hendrick's order affects more than 19,545 voters who registered at motor vehicle offices or with a federal form without providing documentary proof of U.S. citizenship.

The judge stopped short of issuing the permanent injunction sought by the American Civil Liberties Union. Kobach's office says it is reviewing the ruling.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

The American Civil Liberties Union is asking a judge to enforce her earlier order requiring Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach to put on voter rolls people who registered at motor vehicle offices without providing citizenship documents.

In a filing Friday, the group also requested that U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson issue an order for Kobach to show cause why he should not be held in contempt.

Kobach says the state "is in full compliance with the district court's order."

Stephen Koranda / KPR

A judge in Topeka is considering if he should permanently block a policy that says some Kansans can only vote in federal races. As Stephen Koranda reports, Secretary of State Kris Kobach and the ACLU butted heads in court on Wednesday.

The Kansas policy was created in response to a federal court order earlier this year. The rule says people who registered at the DMV, but didn’t prove their citizenship, can only vote in federal races. Kobach says that complies with the federal court while still enforcing the state law that says you have to prove your citizenship.

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

A federal appeals court seems likely to side with voting rights groups trying to stop Kansas, Georgia and Alabama from making residents prove they are U.S. citizens when registering to vote using a national form.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

Only 73 of an estimated 17,000 voters affected by recent court rulings cast ballots in the Kansas primary election. Those Kansans registered to vote at the DMV but didn’t provide a citizenship document required under state law.

Secretary of State Kris Kobach and other state officials certified the election results on Thursday. Kobach believes the turnout was so low because many of those affected voters may have already moved.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is asking a federal appeals court on Tuesday to prevent thousands of Kansans from potentially casting ballots in the fall election.

As Stephen Koranda reports, this is the latest in a long series of litigation over Kansas voter registration requirements.

Hugo Phan / KMUW, File Photo

There are 17,500 people in Kansas who will now be allowed to vote in state and local races during Tuesday’s primary election due to a ruling handed down on Friday. Of those voters, roughly 4,200 live in Sedgwick County.

Back in May, Secretary of State Kris Kobach was ordered to register thousands of suspended voters in Kansas who used the DMV to sign up to vote. Even though these voters were protected by federal law from providing proof of citizenship, Kobach made the decision to only count their votes in federal races.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

There’s a legal challenge underway to a new state regulation that would throw out some votes cast by thousands of Kansans. It affects people who registered to vote at the DMV but didn’t turn in a citizenship document required under Kansas law.

The rule says nearly 20,000 Kansans with a suspended voter registration would be allowed to cast ballots, but only their votes in federal races would be counted.