voter ID laws

Kansas News Service/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is defending Kansas' strict voter registration laws in federal court in a trial that has now entered its second week.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Some lawmakers said Monday that putting Kansas at the center of a database intended to root out voter fraud might eventually put it in the middle of a lawsuit if things go wrong.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Legal challenges to a Kansas law requiring proof of citizenship to register to vote are headed to trial next month.

U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson on Friday added additional days to a previously scheduled trial that begins March 6 in Kansas City, Kansas. The new schedule sets aside eight days for the bench trial.

American Civil Liberties Union sued Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach on behalf of the League of Women Voters and voters over the requirement that people produce a document such as a birth certificate or U.S. passport to register at motor vehicle offices.

Carla Eckels / KMUW

Some states fear that a Kansas voter record system could fall prey to hackers, prompting a delay in the annual collection of nearly 100 million people’s records into a database scoured for double-registrations.

Kansas News Service/File photo

Following a ruling Wednesday that could complicate the case, the fight over whether Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach violated the constitution in his quest to demand proof of citizenship from voters will go to trial in March.

Newly unsealed testimony given by Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach suggests he knew that the federal motor voter law might have to be amended for states to require proof of citizenship for voter registration.

In a sworn deposition in a lawsuit challenging Kansas’ proof-of-citizenship requirement, Kobach acknowledged drafting proposed amendments to the National Voter Registration Act, the formal name of the motor voter law, after courts blocked the requirement for Kansas voters registering at DMV offices.

Wikipedia

This weekend in Lawrence, the ACLU will kick off a national campaign on voting rights called Let People Vote. The group chose Kansas because of the state’s strict voting policies pushed by Secretary of State Kris Kobach.

Micah Kubic, with the ACLU of Kansas, says the group is moving to a more proactive position.

“When we shift from defense to offense it means that we cannot and will not only file lawsuits and do litigation,” Kubic says.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

More from the AP:  

A conservative firebrand promoting President Donald Trump's unsubstantiated claims of widespread voter fraud oversees a Kansas election system that threw out at least three times as many ballots as any similarly sized state did, fueling concerns about massive voter suppression should its practices become the national standard.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

The morning he was due in federal court to give a deposition in an ongoing voter registration case, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach tweeted his support for President Trump’s proposal to curb legal immigration.

Joe Gratz / flickr Creative Commons

A federal appeals court ruling will force Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach to answer questions under oath about plans to change U.S. election law.

The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals on Wednesday denied the Kansas Republican's request for an emergency stay of his deposition by the American Civil Liberties Union.

Kobach's office declined to comment on the decision.

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