voter ID laws

Stephen Koranda / KPR

A judge in Topeka is considering if he should permanently block a policy that says some Kansans can only vote in federal races. As Stephen Koranda reports, Secretary of State Kris Kobach and the ACLU butted heads in court on Wednesday.

The Kansas policy was created in response to a federal court order earlier this year. The rule says people who registered at the DMV, but didn’t prove their citizenship, can only vote in federal races. Kobach says that complies with the federal court while still enforcing the state law that says you have to prove your citizenship.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach has discarded as of August the registrations of about 6,570 prospective voters under a rule that allows him to purge them after 90 days primarily for lack of proof of citizenship, the League of Women Voters said Tuesday.

Those prospective voters whose names are missing likely registered at some place other than a motor vehicle office and so their right to vote is not protected by recent court orders compelling Kobach to keep them on the rolls. They would need to register again in order to vote in November.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach will head to court again this week in a lawsuit over the state’s voter registration laws. At issue are thousands of people who registered to vote at the DMV but did not provide a proof-of-citizenship document required under Kansas law.

After a federal court ruling earlier this year, Kobach said those Kansas DMV voters could only cast ballots in federal races; their votes in state races would not be counted.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Updated 9/12/16:

The Sedgwick County Election office in Wichita may have another set of changes to deal with. A federal appeals court Friday blocked Kansas, Georgia and Alabama from requiring residents to prove that they are U.S. citizens on a national registration form.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

Only 73 of an estimated 17,000 voters affected by recent court rulings cast ballots in the Kansas primary election. Those Kansans registered to vote at the DMV but didn’t provide a citizenship document required under state law.

Secretary of State Kris Kobach and other state officials certified the election results on Thursday. Kobach believes the turnout was so low because many of those affected voters may have already moved.

Sedgwickcounty.org

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach defended the state’s voter registration law in a federal appeals court on Tuesday. He says thousands of Kansans who registered to vote at the DMV without proving their citizenship should not be allowed to cast ballots.

A lower court said in May that those Kansans can vote, but Kobach wants that overturned. Kobach told the appeals court that Kansas is allowed to require citizenship documents that aren’t required under federal law.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is asking a federal appeals court on Tuesday to prevent thousands of Kansans from potentially casting ballots in the fall election.

As Stephen Koranda reports, this is the latest in a long series of litigation over Kansas voter registration requirements.

Hugo Phan / KMUW, File Photo

There are 17,500 people in Kansas who will now be allowed to vote in state and local races during Tuesday’s primary election due to a ruling handed down on Friday. Of those voters, roughly 4,200 live in Sedgwick County.

Back in May, Secretary of State Kris Kobach was ordered to register thousands of suspended voters in Kansas who used the DMV to sign up to vote. Even though these voters were protected by federal law from providing proof of citizenship, Kobach made the decision to only count their votes in federal races.

Stephen Koranda

The State Election Board on Monday decided that an Osage County woman is a citizen and will be able to vote, despite the fact that she doesn’t have a document proving it.

Kansas law requires people registering to vote for the first time in the state to prove their U.S. citizenship with a document such as a birth certificate.

Making Sense Of Kansas' Ever-Changing Voting Laws

Jul 25, 2016
Becky McCray / flickr Creative Commons

Ever since the Kansas Secure and Fair Elections Act went into effect in 2013, there has been a seemingly endless string of legal battles over its legitimacy. The controversial law requires people to provide proof of citizenship when registering to vote. It was authored by Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who believes the law protects Kansas from fraudulent voting.

Here, a look into the wonderful world of state and federal lawsuits to find out how the SAFE Act may affect upcoming elections in Kansas.

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