voter ID laws

Stephen Koranda

County election officials in Kansas are beginning to implement a new rule that cancels incomplete voter registrations after 90 days. The rule faces a legal challenge, but a court last week declined to put it on hold. The secretary of state’s office recommends registrations that have now been incomplete for more than 90 days be canceled.


Sedgwickcounty.org

Kansas election officials are expected to begin removing the names of more than 31,000 prospective voters from their registration records Friday in line with the state's tough voter identification law, which requires applicants to prove their citizenship before casting a ballot.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

A lawsuit is targeting Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach over a new rule he put in place that will cancel incomplete voter registrations. The suit also asks a federal court to overturn the Kansas requirement that voters supply documents proving their citizenship.

More than 30,000 Kansas voter registrations have been put on hold because they don’t include the citizenship documents. Kobach’s new rule would cancel those incomplete registrations once they are 90 days old.

Kansas residents whose voter registrations have been suspended because they haven't provided a passport or birth certificate have 90 days to provide the documents before their registrations are canceled.

Marc Nozell, flickr Creative Commons; kslegislature.org

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is trading barbs over social media with Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton on voting rights.

The spat was sparked by Kobach's proposal to throw out after 90 days names of more than 34,000 potential voters who registered in the state, but didn't provide proof-of-citizenship documents like a birth certificate or naturalization papers.

Clinton's campaign late Monday posted a comment on Twitter calling the plan a "targeted attack on voting rights," including a link to a story from The Associated Press about it.

Carla Eckels

The U.S. Supreme Court announced Monday they won't hear a lawsuit that looked to add proof of citizenship requirements to federal registration forms in both Kansas and Arizona.

U.S. Dept. of Justice [Public domain] / Wikimedia Commons

Kansans who registered to vote using a federal form without providing citizenship documentation will still not be able to vote in state elections despite the latest U.S. Supreme Court action.

The justices on Monday rejected an appeal from Republican officials in Kansas and Arizona who have sought to have federal elections officials enforce state laws requiring new voters to submit a birth certificate, passport or other papers documenting U.S. citizenship.

The fight over a voter proof-of-citizenship law that prevented about 22,000 Kansas residents from casting ballots on Election Day has shifted back to state courts and lawmakers.

The U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals recently overturned a judge's order that added citizenship documentation requirements on national voter registration forms used by Kansas and Arizona voters.

Republican Secretary of State Kris Kobach has championed the state law as a way to limit fraud; opponents argue that it wrongfully disenfranchises voters.

A federal appeals court has ruled that Kansas and Arizona residents can register to vote using a federal form without providing proof of citizenship.

Most residents in the two states register using a separate state form requiring them to show a birth certificate, a U.S. passport or naturalization papers.

Kansas and Arizona had asked the U.S. government to also impose that same requirement on voters who register using the simpler federal form, which only requires a sworn statement.

Carla Eckels / KMUW

  Some people who went to the Sedgwick County Zoo for advance voting in Wichita on Tuesday experienced problems when trying to vote. Sedgwick County Election Commissioner Tabitha Lehman says the problem was not with the voting machines.

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