voter ID laws

A judge will hear arguments on whether to block the two-tiered voting system in Kansas just days before the primary election.

Shawnee County District Judge Larry Hendricks has set a July 29 hearing in Topeka on the American Civil Liberties Union's request for a temporary restraining order. The primary is Aug. 2.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach has championed laws restricting voting that are rippling across the country. The conservative Republican argues the tough laws on voting eligibility are needed to protect elections against fraud, but critics contend such restrictions are unnecessary and suppress voter turnout, particularly among the young and minority voters.

Arizona enacted the nation's first proof of citizenship law in 2004, followed by similar laws in Kansas, Georgia and Alabama.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

The ACLU has filed a lawsuit against Kris Kobach over a dual voting process they say is illegal. The current system in place for Kansas elections would allow thousands of suspended voters to cast ballots only in federal elections, but not state or local ones.

A federal court ruling in May stated that forcing someone to provide a birth certificate or passport when registering to vote at motor vehicle offices violates federal law. The judge ordered Kansas to register roughly 17,000 suspended voters.

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

A federal appeals court will hear oral arguments in September in an appeal that could affect the voting rights of thousands of voters in Kansas, Georgia and Alabama in upcoming elections.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia on Thursday set a Sept. 8 hearing date in the case of a U.S. election official who without public notice required documentary proof of citizenship on a national voter registration form used by residents of the three states.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

This post was updated on Tuesday at 12:21 p.m.

With little notice, a state panel has approved a temporary election rule that will have some Kansans vote with provisional ballots, but only their votes in federal races will be counted. Votes for state and local races will be tossed out.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Kansans who register to vote using a federal form at the Department of Motor Vehicles will have to provide proof of citizenship as a lawsuit plays out, a judge ruled Wednesday.

The League of Women Voters and other civil rights groups had sought a preliminary injunction to block such rules in Kansas, Alabama and Georgia.

Keith Ivey / Flickr

Residents of Kansas, Georgia and Alabama will have to prove they are U.S. citizens when registering to vote for federal elections using a national form, a judge ruled Wednesday.

U.S. District Judge Richard Leon sided against a coalition of voting rights groups that sued a U.S. elections official who changed the proof-of-citizenship requirements on the federal registration form at the request of the three states and without public notice. Residents of other states only need to swear that they are citizens, not show proof.

Becky McCray / flickr Creative Commons

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is planning to use provisional ballots during the upcoming elections and then throw out all of the votes for state and local races cast by the thousands of voters who register to vote at motor vehicle offices without providing proof of citizenship.

An email sent from Kobach's office to county election officials outlines the state's proposed plans for implementing a two-tiered election system in the wake of a federal court order requiring Kansas to allow these voters to cast ballots at least in the federal races.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Thousands of people in Kansas have incomplete voter registrations, which means they haven’t been able to vote. They were caught up in the state’s requirement that some people provide citizenship documents when registering. Now, a federal appeals court says many of those people should be allowed to vote in federal elections.

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

A U.S. appeals court has ruled that thousands of suspended voters in Kansas who used motor vehicles offices to register to vote must be allowed to cast a ballot in federal elections.

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