voter registration

Laura Spencer / KCUR

Oct. 18 is the deadline in Kansas to register to vote in next month's elections. But, as KMUW's Aileen LeBlanc reports, the documentation you need is not the same across the board.

This is an exceptional election in many ways, but in Kansas, a changing set of rules has made it downright confusing for many people.

Because of a recent court order, people who register with a federal form, such as at the DMV, do not need citizenship documents--while those who register using Kansas forms must present a passport or birth certificate.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

The deadline to register to vote in the general election is just a day away. KMUW’s Nadya Faulx has more on how to get registered if you’re not already.

Kansans have until 11:59 p.m. on Tuesday to register to vote in next month’s election.

Recent court cases mean people who register at the DMV or using a federal form don’t have to provide proof of citizenship.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

A fight over the voter registration laws in Kansas is down to deadlines. Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s office missed a deadline in a lawsuit challenging the proof-of-citizenship requirement. As Stephen Koranda reports, that caused a judge to rule against Kobach.

Mark Johnson, one of the attorneys challenging the law, says they will oppose the judge accepting the document because Kobach was late with another filing already in the suit.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Democrats and voting rights advocates are ramping up voter registration drives across Kansas in the wake of recent court rulings allowing thousands of people to more easily register with a federal form or at motor vehicle offices without providing citizenship documents.

But the state's Republican Party contends those court cases are "practically irrelevant" to the November election.

GOP Executive Director Clay Barker says it isn't putting party emphasis on registration because its numbers are so high in Kansas and registration "tends to take care of itself."

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Tuesday is National Voter Registration Day, a single day set aside for a coordinated awareness campaign to get more people registered to vote.

As KMUW’s Deborah Shaar reports, social media is making a big difference with registrations in Sedgwick County this year.

Election Commissioner Tabitha Lehman says recent Facebook, Google and Twitter campaigns have been sending links to people so they can register to vote online.

And, she says, it’s working.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

The American Civil Liberties Union is asking a judge to enforce her earlier order requiring Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach to put on voter rolls people who registered at motor vehicle offices without providing citizenship documents.

In a filing Friday, the group also requested that U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson issue an order for Kobach to show cause why he should not be held in contempt.

Kobach says the state "is in full compliance with the district court's order."

Stephen Koranda / KPR

A judge in Topeka is considering if he should permanently block a policy that says some Kansans can only vote in federal races. As Stephen Koranda reports, Secretary of State Kris Kobach and the ACLU butted heads in court on Wednesday.

The Kansas policy was created in response to a federal court order earlier this year. The rule says people who registered at the DMV, but didn’t prove their citizenship, can only vote in federal races. Kobach says that complies with the federal court while still enforcing the state law that says you have to prove your citizenship.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Computer hackers recently targeted voter data in Arizona and Illinois, but Kansas election officials say they're confident state data is secure. Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s office is responsible for the security of voter registration records.

“We have a layer of security that protects our voter rolls that those states did not have. I’m not going to state specifically what it is, but it is a significant one,” Kobach says.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

Only 73 of an estimated 17,000 voters affected by recent court rulings cast ballots in the Kansas primary election. Those Kansans registered to vote at the DMV but didn’t provide a citizenship document required under state law.

Secretary of State Kris Kobach and other state officials certified the election results on Thursday. Kobach believes the turnout was so low because many of those affected voters may have already moved.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is asking a federal appeals court on Tuesday to prevent thousands of Kansans from potentially casting ballots in the fall election.

As Stephen Koranda reports, this is the latest in a long series of litigation over Kansas voter registration requirements.