voter registration

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President Donald Trump has named Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach as vice chair of a group that will study voter fraud. The Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity will be headed by Vice President Mike Pence.

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A federal magistrate says he wants to inspect documents that Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach shared with then President-elect Trump during the transition.

The order came in a case challenging the Kansas law requiring proof of citizenship for voter registration. The ACLU claims the requirement violates the federal motor voter act, which only requires voters to swear they are citizens. Kobach argues that has allowed non-citizens to register.

Peggy Lowe / KCUR

Randall Killian thought he was investing in his new retirement property in Colorado when he received a mail-in ballot in 2012 asking if he would like to legalize marijuana in that state.

“When I saw that on the ballot, it's like, ‘Oh, wow, that’s something I’ll never get a chance to vote for again.' So bam! I vote on it,” Killian says. “Voted in Ellis County [Kansas], just like I’d done for 25 years.”

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Secretary of State Kris Kobach wants lawmakers to give him the authority to create a two-tiered voting system in Kansas. That would mean people who register to vote at the DMV and don’t provide a citizenship document, as required under state law, would only be allowed to vote in federal races.

Kansas voter registration laws still require proof of citizenship, but federal courts have ruled that the state can’t require such proof when people register to vote at the DMV or when they use a federal registration form. Kobach says that bypasses the state’s voter registration rules.

Gage Skidmore / flickr Creative Commons

Secretary of State Kris Kobach pushed for tighter voting laws in Kansas aimed at preventing voter fraud. He also was an early supporter of Donald Trump and has advised the campaign. KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports on what the Trump election could mean for voting laws like the ones in Kansas.

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A judge has granted a permanent injunction in the ever-changing voter registration system in Kansas, but who must prove U.S. citizenship to vote, and who does not, are still questions floating in the air.

A temporary injunction has now become final. It's the much-litigated issue about registering to vote at DMVs with the federal form or at local elections offices.

Laura Spencer / KCUR/File photo

Oct. 18 is the deadline in Kansas to register to vote in next month's elections. But, as KMUW's Aileen LeBlanc reports, the documentation you need is not the same across the board.

This is an exceptional election in many ways, but in Kansas, a changing set of rules has made it downright confusing for many people.

Because of a recent court order, people who register with a federal form, such as at the DMV, do not need citizenship documents--while those who register using Kansas forms must present a passport or birth certificate.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

The deadline to register to vote in the general election is just a day away. KMUW’s Nadya Faulx has more on how to get registered if you’re not already.

Kansans have until 11:59 p.m. on Tuesday to register to vote in next month’s election.

Recent court cases mean people who register at the DMV or using a federal form don’t have to provide proof of citizenship.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

A fight over the voter registration laws in Kansas is down to deadlines. Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s office missed a deadline in a lawsuit challenging the proof-of-citizenship requirement. As Stephen Koranda reports, that caused a judge to rule against Kobach.

Mark Johnson, one of the attorneys challenging the law, says they will oppose the judge accepting the document because Kobach was late with another filing already in the suit.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Democrats and voting rights advocates are ramping up voter registration drives across Kansas in the wake of recent court rulings allowing thousands of people to more easily register with a federal form or at motor vehicle offices without providing citizenship documents.

But the state's Republican Party contends those court cases are "practically irrelevant" to the November election.

GOP Executive Director Clay Barker says it isn't putting party emphasis on registration because its numbers are so high in Kansas and registration "tends to take care of itself."

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