voter registration

Ho John Lee / Flickr

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach's proof-of-citizenship rule is in play again, shortly after the federal registration form was changed.

The federal Justice Department has refused to support a U.S. elections official who sided with Kansas, Alabama and Georgia in a fight over whether voters should have to show proof of citizenship when registering using a national form.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

The Sedgwick County Elections Office has received instructions from the Kansas Secretary of State’s office to adhere to a new voting rule put in place last week.

The decision was made by the new executive director of the U.S. Elections Assistance Commission.

According to the Secretary of State's office, the decision means Kansas residents can no longer register to vote using a federal form without providing proof of citizenship, such as a birth certificate.

In most other states, no such documentation is needed to register; voters need only sign a sworn statement.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach will pursue three more cases of voter fraud for alleged double voting. Kobach discussed the cases during a meeting at the Statehouse yesterday.

The three new cases come from Johnson, Ellis and Sedgwick Counties. In all three, the people are accused of voting more than once in an election.

Democratic state Rep. Tom Sawyer told Kobach that it doesn’t seem like voter fraud to him if someone voted twice when they thought they could and didn’t have criminal intent. Kobach says it’s important to prosecute the crimes.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

A Kansas judge has ruled that Secretary of State Kris Kobach has no legal right to bar people who register to vote using a federal form from voting in local and state elections.

Shawnee County District Judge Franklin Theis ruled Friday in favor of two Kansas voters who challenged how Kobach is enforcing a state proof-of-citizenship requirement for registering to vote.

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

Lawyers for two northeast Kansas voters have temporarily withdrawn a request for a court order blocking the state from enforcing registration restrictions.

U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson canceled a hearing scheduled Friday in the federal lawsuit after the request was withdrawn Thursday.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Sedgwick County election officials are looking at the names on their suspended voter list. Secretary of State Kris Kobach has ruled that any names that are still listed after 90 days must be removed.

Stephen Koranda

County election officials in Kansas are beginning to implement a new rule that cancels incomplete voter registrations after 90 days. The rule faces a legal challenge, but a court last week declined to put it on hold. The secretary of state’s office recommends registrations that have now been incomplete for more than 90 days be canceled.


Wikimedia Commons

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is pushing a plan to cancel voter registrations if they aren’t completed within 90 days. Kansas law requires people registering to vote for the first time to prove their citizenship, and more than 30,000 voter registrations are on hold because they don't include the documents. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, a hearing Wednesday will give the public a chance to weigh in on the plan.

Carla Eckels

The U.S. Supreme Court announced Monday they won't hear a lawsuit that looked to add proof of citizenship requirements to federal registration forms in both Kansas and Arizona.

U.S. Dept. of Justice [Public domain] / Wikimedia Commons

Kansans who registered to vote using a federal form without providing citizenship documentation will still not be able to vote in state elections despite the latest U.S. Supreme Court action.

The justices on Monday rejected an appeal from Republican officials in Kansas and Arizona who have sought to have federal elections officials enforce state laws requiring new voters to submit a birth certificate, passport or other papers documenting U.S. citizenship.

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