voting

Sedgwickcounty.org

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach defended the state’s voter registration law in a federal appeals court on Tuesday. He says thousands of Kansans who registered to vote at the DMV without proving their citizenship should not be allowed to cast ballots.

A lower court said in May that those Kansans can vote, but Kobach wants that overturned. Kobach told the appeals court that Kansas is allowed to require citizenship documents that aren’t required under federal law.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach is asking a federal appeals court on Tuesday to prevent thousands of Kansans from potentially casting ballots in the fall election.

As Stephen Koranda reports, this is the latest in a long series of litigation over Kansas voter registration requirements.

Carla Eckels / KMUW

Canvassing results were finalized Tuesday at the Sedgwick County Election Office in downtown Wichita. Voter turnout for the Aug. 2 primary election was 17 percent.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Kansas officials are counting votes from this month's primary election, including the votes cast on more than 9,000 provisional ballots across the state. It’s not yet clear how many of those are from 17,000 people affected by a recent court ruling.

Just days before the primary, a judge ruled that people who registered to vote at the DMV, without turning in a citizenship document, would be allowed to vote with a provisional ballot.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Secretary of State Kris Kobach says the voting in yesterday’s primary election went smoothly across Kansas, with no significant problems. But one issue that remains is how many Kansans cast provisional ballots after a judge allowed 17,000 previously suspended voters to take part in the election.

The provisional ballots from those voters will be hand counted in the coming days. Kobach says he does not expect any issues handling those extra votes.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW/File photo

Polls opened at 6 this morning in Sedgwick County for the primary election.

Election Commissioner Tabitha Lehman says 7 polling places have moved since the last election. Notifications were sent out in June to about 26,000 people affected by the changes, but she recommends all voters check their polling place.

The last day to change party affiliations was June 1.

Ho John Lee / Flickr

There could be thousands of additional provisional ballots cast in Kansas during Tuesday's primary election because of a recent court ruling. A judge says 17,000 people who were previously suspended for not turning in a citizenship document will be allowed to vote in state and local races. They will be casting provisional ballots that county officials will hand count after the election.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

About one in four registered voters will cast a ballot in tomorrow’s Kansas primary election, according to Secretary of State Kris Kobach. He said expects about 410,000 thousand people to vote, a slight increase from the last presidential election cycle in 2012.

Kobach says the high number of contested legislative races will play a part in the higher turnout. In previous years, Kobach says, many legislative districts only had a competitive primary on either the Democratic or the Republican side.

Jim McLean / KHI News Service

Kansas doesn’t have a reputation for political corruption. It isn’t Chicago where the dead are rumored to cast ballots. And it’s not Florida, home of the hanging chad. But, Jim McLean reports, as Kansans prepare to go to the polls for tomorrow’s primaries there are lingering concerns about the potential for vote tampering.

Carla Eckels / KMUW, File Photo

A Shawnee County judge has ruled that 17,000 Kansans who registered to vote at the DMV will be able to vote in all races in the primary election.

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