voting

Ho John Lee / Flickr

There could be thousands of additional provisional ballots cast in Kansas during Tuesday's primary election because of a recent court ruling. A judge says 17,000 people who were previously suspended for not turning in a citizenship document will be allowed to vote in state and local races. They will be casting provisional ballots that county officials will hand count after the election.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

About one in four registered voters will cast a ballot in tomorrow’s Kansas primary election, according to Secretary of State Kris Kobach. He said expects about 410,000 thousand people to vote, a slight increase from the last presidential election cycle in 2012.

Kobach says the high number of contested legislative races will play a part in the higher turnout. In previous years, Kobach says, many legislative districts only had a competitive primary on either the Democratic or the Republican side.

Jim McLean / KHI News Service

Kansas doesn’t have a reputation for political corruption. It isn’t Chicago where the dead are rumored to cast ballots. And it’s not Florida, home of the hanging chad. But, Jim McLean reports, as Kansans prepare to go to the polls for tomorrow’s primaries there are lingering concerns about the potential for vote tampering.

Carla Eckels / KMUW, File Photo

A Shawnee County judge has ruled that 17,000 Kansans who registered to vote at the DMV will be able to vote in all races in the primary election.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

The ACLU will be asking a judge tomorrow to block a regulation that will throw out some votes cast by thousands of Kansans.

The regulation affects people who registered to vote at the DMV but failed to provide proof of U.S. citizenship, as required by Kansas law. The rule says those people can vote, but only their votes in federal races will be counted.

Mark Johnson has been working on the ACLU lawsuit trying to change that.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

A Lawrence man believes Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s office may have purposely mishandled online voting records, and he wants a grand jury to investigate.

Steven Davis is a Democratic candidate for the state Legislature challenging incumbent House member Barbara Ballard. He says he’s heard rumors that some voter registration applications submitted online didn’t make it to county election offices, meaning some people weren’t being registered to vote. Davis has submitted a petition calling for a grand jury to consider if Kobach’s office committed election fraud.

Carla Eckels / KMUW

Dozens of people attended a primary political forum at St. Paul AME Church Sunday night. The event was supported by the Voter Empowerment Committee, which is made up of churches, civic groups and other organizations.

Making Sense Of Kansas' Ever-Changing Voting Laws

Jul 25, 2016
Becky McCray / flickr Creative Commons

Ever since the Kansas Secure and Fair Elections Act went into effect in 2013, there has been a seemingly endless string of legal battles over its legitimacy. The controversial law requires people to provide proof of citizenship when registering to vote. It was authored by Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who believes the law protects Kansas from fraudulent voting.

Here, a look into the wonderful world of state and federal lawsuits to find out how the SAFE Act may affect upcoming elections in Kansas.

A judge will hear arguments on whether to block the two-tiered voting system in Kansas just days before the primary election.

Shawnee County District Judge Larry Hendricks has set a July 29 hearing in Topeka on the American Civil Liberties Union's request for a temporary restraining order. The primary is Aug. 2.

Ho John Lee / Flickr

The Sedgwick County Election Office is now open for voting in advance of the Aug. 2 primary election.

Paper ballots and electronic voting machines are available to cast your ballot at the Sedgwick County Election Office. You can vote at the office through Aug. 1. Next week, 15 locations across Sedgwick County will also offer in-person early voting.

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