water

City of Wichita

Legislation that would ensure a safe drinking water supply in south-central Kansas passed the U.S. Senate today.

The legislation extends the authorization of federal funding for the Equus Beds Aquifer Recharge and Recovery Project by 10 years. The aquifer is the primary fresh water source for south-central Kansas and lies under parts of Sedgwick, Harvey, Reno and McPherson Counties.

mcdarius, flickr Creative Commons

The Global Learning Center of Wichita is hosting a series of talks this weekend about climate change and its threat to the world’s water and food supplies.

The nonprofit has been around since 1988 and is focused on presenting issues that affect people both in Kansas and around the world. The organization’s latest series of speakers will narrow in on climate change and what it’s doing to the world’s water and food supplies.

Pictoscribe, flickr Creative Commons

The City of Wichita begins it 2016 water rebate program on Monday. Water customers may receive some cash back for purchases that are easy on the water supply.

High-efficiency washing machines, dishwashers and toilets that use less water will qualify for the rebate and can earn their owner a $100 bonus from the city. In addition to those items, prospective recipients can report smart controllers for irrigation and sensors that detect rain and turn off automatic irrigation for the same amount.

Those who have bought a rain barrel can also apply for a rebate up to $75.

mcdarius, flickr Creative Commons

On Tuesday, President Obama vetoed a Congressional effort to halt changes to the Clean Water Act. As Harvest Public Media’s Luke Runyon reports many farm groups oppose the regulatory change.

The Obama Administration wants to alter a portion of the Clean Water Act to clarify the bodies of water that can be regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency. Some prominent farm groups worry the language is too vague and characterized the rule as an overreach by the EPA.

mcdarius, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas officials are considering tougher penalties for people who chronically exceed water supply consumption limits or don't report how much water is pumped from wells.

Susan Metzger is assistant secretary of the state Department of Agriculture, she talked about changing penalties Thursday before an interim legislative committee. She said the $250 fine for not reporting water use isn't much of a deterrent. She said overdrawing water for a year gets a written notice.

Metzger said the department hasn't determined how much penalties would rise, or when it would take effect.

mcdarius, flickr Creative Commons

The mayor of Wichita says despite recent heavy rain in the area, residents need to keep working to conserve water.

Mayor Jeff Longwell said Thursday that heavy rain in south-central Kansas this month has helped the city's water supply, but conserving water is still important in order to meet future long-term demand. The city says in a release that Cheney Lake, one of Wichita's two primary water sources, gained more than 5.5 billion gallons since the beginning of the month.

Joe Dyer, flickr Creative Commons

There's a meeting planned this week in Kansas to discuss concerns about using water pumped from the Ogallala Aquifer in northeast Colorado to help satisfy streamflow requirements on the Republican River.

The gathering Tuesday in St. Francis will include Governor Sam Brownback along with agriculture and water officials.

Representative Rick Billinger of Goodland wants to gather input on the pumping project and "possible ways to preserve the Ogallala for future users."

gumotorg, flickr Creative Commons

The state will have series of 26 public meetings across Kansas this month to set regional water supply goals and priorities.

Trained facilitators from Kansas State University Research and Extension and the Institute for Civic Discourse and Democracy will help facilitate the public meetings.

14 regional water leadership teams will create water supply goals based on public input and available resources.

The regional water supply goals that they draft will be presented to the Kansas Water Authority in May.

City Of Wichita

The City of Wichita has reported that a leak at the city’s water treatment plant has been repaired. The leak was first discovered on January 21, and a bypass pipe was installed on January 30. KMUW’s Sean Sandefur has more…

The source of the leak was a 66-inch pipe that takes in raw water from the Cheney Reservoir and the Equus water beds.

City officials say it was important to get it repaired before spring, when water is in higher demand.

City Of Wichita

Update 01/27/15:

Crews are making progress building a bypass pipe after a leak was discovered last week near the city's water treatment plant. KMUW’s Abigail Wilson has more…

Crews are still working to bypass the main line that carries water to Wichita from Cheney Reservoir and the Equus Beds Aquifer. Alan King, director of public works, said the completion date for the bypass pipe has been bumped back to Thursday because of snags in the process including the availability of parts.

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