water

City Of Wichita

The City of Wichita has reported that a leak at the city’s water treatment plant has been repaired. The leak was first discovered on January 21, and a bypass pipe was installed on January 30. KMUW’s Sean Sandefur has more…

The source of the leak was a 66-inch pipe that takes in raw water from the Cheney Reservoir and the Equus water beds.

City officials say it was important to get it repaired before spring, when water is in higher demand.

City Of Wichita

Update 01/27/15:

Crews are making progress building a bypass pipe after a leak was discovered last week near the city's water treatment plant. KMUW’s Abigail Wilson has more…

Crews are still working to bypass the main line that carries water to Wichita from Cheney Reservoir and the Equus Beds Aquifer. Alan King, director of public works, said the completion date for the bypass pipe has been bumped back to Thursday because of snags in the process including the availability of parts.

Workers with the Kansas Geological Survey are hitting the road this month to check groundwater levels in central and western Kansas.

Rex Buchanan, with the KGS, says lessening drought conditions may lead to less aquifer depletion then they’ve seen in recent years. He says irrigation is one of the main uses of water from the aquifer.

“The more it rains, the less you have to irrigate. The less it rains, the more you have to irrigate. In dry years, because there’s less water available naturally, people irrigate more,” says Buchanan

The Kansas Water Vision team will be in Wichita on Monday to get feedback on the first draft of the vision. KMUWs Abigail Wilson has more…

The Kansas Water Vision team will hold a 90-minute meeting Monday at the Sedgwick County Extension Education Center in west Wichita. The meeting will focus on Governor Sam Brownback’s Call to Action for a 50-Year Vision for the Future of Water in Kansas.

Tracy Streeter, director of the Kansas Water Office, says the team hopes to create dialogue and receive input on the first draft of Vision.

The Kansas Geological Survey says groundwater levels in southwest Kansas declined at a slower pace in 2013 than in recent years.

The KGS also says increases in wells around south-central Kansas are attributed to above-average rainfall that reduced irrigation during the spring growing season.

Preliminary information shows that water tables in southwest Kansas dropped over 2 feet last year. During each of the three previous years, water levels fell by more than 3 feet.

Topeka officials are talking about making improvements to the city's water purification process after struggling to comply with new, stricter guidelines.

Water in Topeka itself is still in compliance.

But three suppliers who receive water from the city recently received notice from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment that their levels of halo-acetic acids were higher than the state allows.

The difference between Topeka and its suppliers could be tied to testing differences.

As smaller distributors, rural districts usually test once per quarter.

Topeka's water department is monitoring the Kansas River for E. coli after a weekend sewage spill.

Kansas water officials want to discover how feasible it would be to build a 360-mile aqueduct. The aqueduct would tap the Missouri River to support agriculture in western parts of the state.

Tracy Streeter with the Kansas Water Office told legislators Tuesday the study would begin next year and take about 18 months to complete.

Officials want to divert as much as 4 million acre-feet of water and sending it west, to help support irrigated farming of corn and other crops.

KMUW's Carla Eckels recently sat down with Ben Nelson of the city’s public works and utilities department to find out more about the state of water in Wichita.

Study: High Plains Aquifer Mostly Gone in 50 Years

Aug 27, 2013

A new study forecasts that 69 percent of the water in the High Plains Aquifer in Kansas will be depleted within 50 years at current usage rates.

The paper by researchers at Kansas State University was published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. It focuses on the Ogallala aquifer in western Kansas.

The study estimates that 30 percent of the aquifer was depleted by 2010 and an additional 39 percent is expected to disappear by 2060.

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