Kansas News Service/File photo

If nothing else, Sam Brownback has marked his time as governor of Kansas with one bold approach after the next. And few remade the status quo as much as his approach to welfare.

Madeline Fox / Kansas News Service

Kansas’ troubled child welfare agency asked lawmakers Monday for money to solve mounting problems: foster kids sleeping in offices, children lost in the system, and a skyrocketing caseload.

Kansas News Service/File photo

A University of Kansas study supports the suspicions of lawmakers and advocates who believe there’s a link between additional restrictions on welfare benefits and an increase in foster care cases.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Members of a legislative task force charged with fixing problems in the Kansas foster care system resumed their discussion of possible solutions on Tuesday.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

The new secretary of the Kansas Department for Children and Families has come in promising a thorough review of the agency, staffing changes and more accountability following allegations and outrage about problems in the state’s foster care system.


The Kansas Department for Children and Families is dealing with computer problems that brought down the system used to process welfare benefits applications.

Theresa Freed, spokeswoman for DCF, says people seeking benefits can still submit paper applications and required documentation. The applications will be entered after the system comes back online.

Kansas News Service/File photo

Kansas is on track to spend less than a third of what it did six years ago on cash assistance and to serve a third as many low-income people, according to a state budget office memo.

Andy Marso / Heartland Health Monitor

For Ashlyn Harcrow, the sound of the train whistle brings up all kinds of thoughts she’d like to avoid. Harcrow, 24, has been living at the Topeka Rescue Mission since July.

The nonprofit homeless shelter has helped her stabilize as she recovers from domestic violence and tries to improve her mental health amid post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas will have tighter welfare rules for cash assistance after Governor Sam Brownback signed some new restrictions into law. The changes will reduce the total amount of time Kansans can take part in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program.

The limit for Kansas families receiving benefits will go down from 36 months to 24 months. The state can grant another year of benefits under certain hardships. Brownback says the goal is getting people off assistance programs and instead into the workforce.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

Kansas lawmakers approved a bill today aimed at changing welfare policies and reducing prescription drug costs within the state's Medicaid program known as KanCare. The measure is now headed to Gov. Sam Brownback for approval or veto.