welfare

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Kansas will have tighter welfare rules for cash assistance after Governor Sam Brownback signed some new restrictions into law. The changes will reduce the total amount of time Kansans can take part in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program.

The limit for Kansas families receiving benefits will go down from 36 months to 24 months. The state can grant another year of benefits under certain hardships. Brownback says the goal is getting people off assistance programs and instead into the workforce.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

Kansas lawmakers approved a bill today aimed at changing welfare policies and reducing prescription drug costs within the state's Medicaid program known as KanCare. The measure is now headed to Gov. Sam Brownback for approval or veto.

Dave Ranney, Heartland Health Monitor

A children’s advocacy group is charging that welfare policies championed by Kansas Governor Sam Brownback are pushing more families into poverty. Heartland Health Monitor’s Jim McLean has the latest in the ongoing dispute.

The nonprofit advocacy organization Kansas Action for Children says the Brownback administration’s welfare policies are unraveling the state’s social services safety net.

@GovSamBrownback Twitter

Gov. Sam Brownback spoke today on what he described as “successes” in the state's welfare programs. Brownback referenced a study released last week by the Foundation for Government Accountability, a conservative multi-state think tank focused on health care and welfare reform.

J. Schafer / KPR

A bill originally promoted as preventing lottery winners from claiming public assistance would now also cut off households that have received cash assistance for more than two years.

Sen. Laura Kelly, a Topeka Democrat, confirmed that the Senate Public Health and Welfare Committee had amended Senate Bill 372 to lower the lifetime Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) limit from 36 months to 24 months.

Stephen Koranda

Republican leaders in the Kansas House and Senate are introducing a bill to fight welfare fraud.

The legislation will require identity verification for adults in the home of a welfare recipient. It will also put requirements in place for getting replacement benefit cards.

Republican state Rep. Dan Hawkins says repeatedly losing a benefit card can indicate possible fraud.

thinkpanama, flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas Department for Children and Families is lifting a restriction on ATM withdrawals by people on cash assistance programs.

Lawmakers this year put a controversial $25-per-day limit on the cash withdrawals of welfare benefits. They later amended the law to give the secretary of DCF the ability to change or rescind the limit, after concerns the rule could put federal grant money in jeopardy.

dcf.ks.org

Enforcement of a law designed to limit where low-income Kansas families can spend their public assistance will take longer than expected, state officials said Monday.

The new law, initially scheduled to take effect July 1, will not be enforced for at least six months.

Theresa Freed, a spokesperson for the Kansas Department for Children and Families, attributed the delay to “a computer-system fix that needs to be done.”

thinkpanama, flickr Creative Commons

Gov. Sam Brownback has signed a bill that allows the state to change controversial limits on the amount of money welfare recipients could withdraw from ATMs.

The bill does not eliminate the restriction. It allows the secretary of the Department for Children and Families to increase or eliminate the $25-per-day limit on ATM withdrawals with a state cash assistance card.

Stephen Koranda

Governor Sam Brownback has signed into law a sweeping bill tightening Kansas welfare rules, but the new requirements must comply with nation-wide guidelines.

Sandra Kimmons with the Kansas Department for Children and Families, says many of the provisions in the law were already on the books.

Some new rules, like a $25 limit on ATM cash withdrawals, may catch the eye of federal officials.

However, Kimmons says that requirement doesn't seem to violate federal rules.

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