Wichita City Council

City of Wichita

Wichita City Council members on Tuesday approved an $18 million, wide-ranging Aquatics Master Plan that will close all but three of the city’s pools.

Councilman Bryan Frye put forth the amended proposal, which keeps open Aley, College Hill and Harvest pools. It will convert six other city pools into splash pads, and install splash pads at Harrison and Planeview parks. Minisa pool will close and be replaced with an unspecified amenity.

Carla Eckels / KMUW

On Tuesday, the Wichita City Council is expected to vote on the Aquatics Master Plan that could close up to nine pools in the city.

Council members will look at several options and determine whether to renovate some of the pools and close others.

The only pool that would be certain to survive is located in College Hill. The other nine were constructed over 35 years ago and need infrastructure improvements.

The first option would retain five pools, while the second option would keep the College Hill pool open as the nine others become splash-pad type sites.

Nadya Faulx

The City of Wichita is looking at making safety and aesthetic improvements to Old Town.

City Council members approved designs Tuesday for work on 1st and 2nd Streets west of Washington.

The $3.5 million improvement plan includes widening the sidewalks and installing speed bumps at certain intersections to slow traffic without lowering the speed limit.

Ark Valley Fire Buff / Flickr

The Wichita City Council approved plans Tuesday to study the police department’s needs as it prepares to build a new station.

The Wichita Police Department is planning to build a new facility to replace its aging Patrol East substation near Kellogg and Edgemoor. It was built in 1989 for about 40 people—now, 140 people work there, Chief Gordon Ramsay told council members.

The city’s Capital Improvement Program includes more than $2 million for a new facility. $125,000 of that will be used to first study how to design a modern police station.

wichita.gov

Wichita City Councilman Pete Meitzner is the most recent contender for the 4th Congressional District seat, a position currently held by Mike Pompeo, President-elect Donald Trump's nominee to head the CIA.

Meitzner, a Republican, has served on the city council since 2011 and recently started his second four-year term. He says that while on the council he's worked to apply business practices to Wichita's government.

"I'd like to follow the lead, along with the president, about putting some more business applications in the federal government," Meitzner said.

City of Wichita

The Wichita City Council elected a new vice-mayor during a special meeting Monday.

Janet Miller won in a unanimous vote. She represents District 6, which covers north-central Wichita and includes Old Town.

Miller was the only council member to express interest in the position.

"I would be very interested and pleased, it would be my privilege to serve as your vice mayor for this next year," she told the council before the vote.

Kansas Department of Health and Environment

The Wichita City Council voted Tuesday in favor of $1.6 million in projects to expand the city's bike and walking paths.

Mike Mozart/Flickr Creative Commons

A Save-A-Lot discount grocery store opened its doors this morning in a Wichita neighborhood previously considered to be a food desert. 

Nan Palmero / flickr Creative Commons

The City of Wichita will no longer allow residents to file their own complaints to report noisy dogs.

City Council members approved the amendment at their meeting Tuesday.

Assistant City Attorney Jan Jarman said the change to the city's animal control ordinance is a small one: Residents used to be able to file a charge with no review or oversight from law enforcement, including Animal Control.

Jarman said the ordinance put prosecutors in the position of pursuing complaints where there was no evidence available.

Sean Sandefur / KMUW/File photo

The City of Wichita has released a map and a list of the streets it plans to repair with money from the sale of the downtown Hyatt hotel.

The $10 million will be enough to fix about 41 percent of the city’s worst asphalt side streets over the next two years. That’s a total of 212 lane miles, located mainly in neighborhoods in established areas of the city.

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