Wichita City Council

Sean Sandefur / KMUW/File photo

The City of Wichita has released a map and a list of the streets it plans to repair with money from the sale of the downtown Hyatt hotel.

The $10 million will be enough to fix about 41 percent of the city’s worst asphalt side streets over the next two years. That’s a total of 212 lane miles, located mainly in neighborhoods in established areas of the city.

Sean Sandefur / KMUW/File photo

The Wichita City Council approved a plan Tuesday that will allow a portion of the proceeds from the sale of the downtown Hyatt Hotel to go toward improving the city's public transit system.

Council members allocated $4 million dollars from the $20 million sale to fund a Transit Sustainability Plan. The city’s transit system is only sustainable through 2018.

The proceeds will go toward redeveloping the system by improving service, offering alternative transportation programs and increasing ridership through education and marketing.

Sean Sandefur / KMUW/File photo

Wichita will use some of the money from the recent sale of the downtown Hyatt Hotel to improve city streets.

Half of the revenue from the $20 million sale will go toward repairing some of Wichita’s worst asphalt and concrete streets. Voters rejected a 1 percent sales tax two years ago that would have only generated about $8 million for maintenance over the course of five years.

Uptown Landing Group

Wichita City Council members on Tuesday approved two mixed-use developments totaling $65 million dollars.

The council unanimously approved developer Uptown Landing’s proposal for a site near Hillside and Douglas. The group will start construction on the commercial and residential space next year, with an expected completion date of March 2020.

“This has been a vacant piece of land in the College Hill community for a number of years," council member Lavonta Williams said. "College Hill residents are very, very anxious to see this new development going to their community."

City of Wichita

The City of Wichita has revealed more details about two development projects totaling $65 million.

Joscarfas / flickr Creative Commons

Wichita residents and businesses can expect to see a slight increase in their water and sewer rates next year.

The Wichita City Council approved a water rate increase of 4 percent, and a sewer rate increase of 5 percent for a combined 4.4 percent increase. It’s less than the rate increase approved last year.

Becky McCray, flickr Creative Commons

New safety measures designed with Wichita’s Old Town district in mind could impact bars across the city.

The Wichita City Council is considering an ordinance that would require bars and clubs to make enhancements to their safety plans or risk temporarily losing their entertainment establishment license. Among the changes is a requirement that bars would have to stop playing music half an hour before closing time, to discourage stragglers.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

The Wichita City Council will have a first reading of a proposed food truck ordinance at its meeting on Tuesday.

Chris Murphy / flickr Creative Commons

The City of Wichita wants to make more improvements along the Arkansas River, and it wants to expand a bond district to pay for it.

The city plans to issue Sales Tax Revenue Bonds, or STAR bonds, to fund renovations to properties along the west bank of the Arkansas River. One major focus would be upgrades to the Lawrence-Dumont Stadium.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Wichita City Council members have approved the purchase of $7 million worth of equipment for the fire department.

Fire Chief Ron Blackwell says the funds will go partly toward replacing a command truck that was purchased in 1993.

“The current unit lacks the technology that is available to us today that can be really beneficial in a number of emergency situations, including hazardous materials, rescue, high-rise building fires and other special needs," he told the City Council at its meeting Tuesday.

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