Wichita State University

Jimmy Wayne, flickr Creative Commons

Significant upgrades will be made to Wichita State University's aerospace engineering building next year.

The building, named for Dwane and Velma Lunt Wallace, will undergo a facelift in the coming years, thanks to a $1 million gift from the foundation bearing their names.

Wallace Hall was built in the 1970s and has not had significant renovation since then. The university says funds will also be used to update and modernize the facility with an emphasis on making it more student-friendly, functional and aesthetically appealing.

Jimmy Everson, DVM, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas' state universities are calling for tuition increases of up to 5 percent, at least for now.

The schools submitted their tuition proposals Wednesday to the governing Kansas Board of Regents. But those came before Gov. Sam Brownback signed a budget bill Wednesday afternoon that cuts higher education funding by 4 percent, 1 percent more than the universities had expected.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Gov. Sam Brownback is cutting most state agencies 4 percent to balance the Kansas budget for next year.

Lawmakers approved an unbalanced budget that required the governor to make almost $100 million in spending reductions to comply with the state Constitution. Brownback’s budget director, Shawn Sullivan, says the governor exempted some agencies and K-12 schools.

Sean Sandefur / KMUW

Members of the Wichita City Council and Sedgwick County Commission met Tuesday morning to discuss the location of a new, shared law enforcement training center. The current facility is housed in a former elementary school, and city officials say the space is too small and outdated.

Hugo Phan / KMUW

Universities in Kansas have until October 1 to draft concealed weapons plans to comply with a new Kansas Board of Regents policy passed this year.

Concealed weapons will be allowed on university campuses beginning July 1, 2017. Schools can bar the weapons in certain buildings under the rule, but only if they add security measures, such as electronic wands or metal detectors.

Sean Sandefur / KMUW

Gov. Sam Brownback has until Thursday to sign a budget passed by the Kansas Legislature two weeks ago. He'll need to find nearly $200 million in savings in order for the budget to be balanced. One of the options on the table is to cut a portion of spending to the University of Kansas and Kansas State. KMUW's Sean Sandefur sat down with Wichita State President John Bardo to talk funding higher education. 


Sedgwick County and City of Wichita officials are scheduled to meet Tuesday to discuss plans for a joint law enforcement training center.

County commissioners voted 3-2 on Wednesday to pursue a meeting with the city to go over four proposals and the evaluation process.

The county’s Bid Board is recommending that the training facility be built on Wichita State University’s Innovation Campus. The estimated cost would be $9.5 million dollars.

Ark Valley Fire Buff / Flickr

Sedgwick County Commissioners are putting off a decision on a new law enforcement training center for at least another week.

The commissioners want to hold a special meeting with the City of Wichita to go over the broader issue of public safety partnerships before they decide on a proposal for a new law enforcement training center.

Jason Rojas / Flickr

Sedgwick County and the City of Wichita are facing a May 18 deadline for finalizing an agreement for a new law enforcement training center.

The county commissioners are set to take up the issue at their Wednesday meeting.

The county’s bid board is recommending the commissioners accept a proposal to build a new law enforcement training center on Wichita State University’s Innovation Campus. The facility would replace the current center, a former elementary school on West 37th Street North that’s more than 30 years old and wasn’t meeting training needs.

Jimmy Wayne, flickr Creative Commons

Wichita State University is planning on a 3 percent budget cut for fiscal year 2017. The move is in response to the state budget passed Monday that includes $17 million in cuts to higher education.

WSU President John BARdo said in a message sent Thursday that the cuts should be considered permanent, saying "it’s unlikely state funding will be restored to universities in the next budget cycle."