Kansas News Service

KMUW's Kansas News Service reports on health, education and politics across the state. The service is a collaboration between KMUW, KCUR and Kansas Public Radio.

http://kha-net.org/

  

The Kansas Hospital Association says the revised health care proposal in the U.S. Senate still comes up short of what’s needed for patients and hospitals in Kansas.

Kansas Hospital Association spokeswoman Cindy Samuelson says the revised Better Care Reconciliation Act would lead to hundreds of millions of dollars in Medicaid cuts for Kansas. Samuelson says that will reduce access to care for children, people with disabilities, and those in nursing homes.

alamosbasement / flickr Creative Commons

New data from the National Student Clearinghouse shows about 44 percent of Kansas students continue onto college or technical education within two years of high school. In response, the state is asking schools to improve their numbers.

Education commissioner Randy Watson says the number of Kansas students going onto college is good compared to other states, but that 44 percent figure, is too low.

Jim McLean / Kansas News Service

Kansas state Sen. Steve Fitzgerald says he’s running for Congress in the 2nd District to keep the seat in Republican hands.

Five-term Republican Lynn Jenkins now holds the seat, but she is not running for re-election.

Creative Commons/Mdupont

The number of Native Americans without health insurance would increase sharply if Republicans in Congress succeed in repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, according to a new report.

nostri-imago / Flickr / Creative Commons

A subcommittee in the U.S. House of Representatives was discussing tax reform on Thursday, and they’re considering some of the same types of tax policies that Kansas recently overturned. Kansas came up multiple times in the discussion.

The plan in the subcommittee would cut tax rates and cut taxes on some business income, known as pass-through income. The goal is economic growth and specifically boosting small business.

California Democrat Mike Thompson noted the similarities to Kansas policies that were repealed.

Jim McLean / Kansas News Service/File photo

U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran’s silence Thursday on the GOP’s revised bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act prompted one Capitol Hill reporter to refer to him as a “mystery man.”

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

This story was updated Thursday to reflect a response from Secretary Kobach's office.

Kansans who registered to vote at the DMV or otherwise used the federal voter registration form are eligible to vote in all races, according to court rulings, whether they’ve provided a citizenship document or not. But those voters might have been confused by inconsistencies on Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach's website.

File Photo / Kansas Public Radio

The Gannon v. Kansas lawsuit is in its seventh year. In that time, the case has led to repeated rulings against the state for underfunding schools and responses by lawmakers in the form of appropriations bills.

What’s it all about? Here are five issues central to the battle.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

A new math class being piloted by dozens of high schools across Kansas seeks to save students stress, time and money when they reach college.

Currently, about one-third of students who continue to two- and four-year colleges in Kansas don’t score high enough on placement tests to enroll directly in college algebra, a class most need in order to graduate.

Instead, they work their way up through remedial classes, a process that can take multiple semesters.

Kansas News Service/File photo

The head of an organization that represents Kansas state employees is criticizing Gov. Sam Brownback’s administration for using a state agency to deliver a political attack on the Legislature.

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