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Abigail Wilson / KMUW

Amid Zika Concerns, Kansas Researchers Target Mosquitoes That Can Carry The Virus

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently awarded Kansas more than $350,000 to support efforts to protect Kansans from Zika virus, a mosquito-borne illness. The money will also go toward eliminating adverse health outcomes that can result from Zika infection, including severe birth defects. Now, state agencies are working to identify and monitor the two species of mosquito that transmit the Zika virus.
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Deborah Shaar / KMUW

Next week’s Republican Primary Election is the first real test for the conservative majority on the Sedgwick County Commission.

The longest serving member of the majority, Commissioner Karl Peterjohn, is up for re-election.

KMUW’s Deborah Shaar tells us how the results of this race could determine the future of the commission’s majority.

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When Karl Peterjohn began serving on the Sedgwick County Commission back in 2008, he brought with him a constitutional conservative philosophy.

Stephen Koranda

According to an audit of the Kansas Department for Children and Families, the agency hasn’t done enough to ensure the safety of children in foster care.

The audit was prompted by instances of foster children being abused or dying.

The report says the agency hasn’t consistently conducted background checks on foster parents, and doesn’t keep up with monthly visits to check on children.

Abigail Wilson / KMUW

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently awarded Kansas more than $350,000 to support efforts to protect Kansans from Zika virus, a mosquito-borne illness. The money will also go toward eliminating adverse health outcomes that can result from Zika infection, including severe birth defects.

Now, state agencies are working to identify and monitor the two species of mosquito that transmit the Zika virus.

Bryan Thompson / Heartland Health Monitor

The economy of western Kansas is based on the Ogallala Aquifer. But that ancient underground water supply is being rapidly depleted. The Kansas Water Office is teaming up with forward-looking farmers in an effort to demonstrate that new irrigation technologies can reduce the demand on the aquifer without sacrificing crop yields.

From mid-May through the end of August, a sound is heard almost non-stop in farm fields all across western Kansas. It’s the sound of an irrigation pump pulling water from deep underground to nourish thirsty crops. Tom Willis owns several of these wells.

Deborah Shaar / KMUW, File Photo

The first of two public hearings on Sedgwick County’s proposed budget for 2017 takes place on Wednesday morning.

The Sedgwick County commissioners have two weeks to finish reviewing the county manager’s recommended 2017 operating budget before taking a vote.

The budget totals about $424 million and includes newly defined priorities for spending increases and reductions.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

For the second time in two years, a major ratings agency downgraded Kansas' credit rating Tuesday because of the state's budget problems.

From the AP:  

S&P Global Ratings dropped its rating for Kansas to "AA-," from AA, three months after putting the state on a negative credit watch. S&P also dropped the state's credit rating in August 2014.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

There’s a legal challenge underway to a new state regulation that would throw out some votes cast by thousands of Kansans. It affects people who registered to vote at the DMV but didn’t turn in a citizenship document required under Kansas law.

The rule says nearly 20,000 Kansans with a suspended voter registration would be allowed to cast ballots, but only their votes in federal races would be counted.

Sean Sandefur / KMUW/File photo

Wichita Festivals, Inc. is reporting an increase in overall attendance, button sales, and food and beverage sales during Riverfest 2016. Combined with a strong safety record, increased community support and a leap in volunteer numbers, the organization has ranked Riverfest 2016 as one of the most successful in recent years.

Crowds totaling 455,000 attended the 45th Riverfest, up from 410,000 in 2015. More than 101,000 admission buttons were sold, up from 97,000 for last year’s festival. Food and beverage sales were also up, with an increase of 17 percent over 2015.

Carla Eckels / KMUW

Dozens of people attended a primary political forum at St. Paul AME Church Sunday night. The event was supported by the Voter Empowerment Committee, which is made up of churches, civic groups and other organizations.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

The word ‘hack’ might bring to mind a darkened basement, glowing computer screens and stealthy young people hunched in front of them. But KMUW’s Nadya Faulx went to a recent hackathon and has this look at the real world of Wichita hacking – in 24 hours.

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Commentary

Crowson: Do Yard Signs Provide the Tipping Point?

I have never truly understood political yard signs. Although I participate in this good ol’ American tradition, I’m not sure why. Political scientists tell us they make a miniscule difference, if any at all.
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KMUW Music

Saturday, July 30
It's another from the Best of the Best series: Zoe Lewis and her Rubber Band performing at the Old Settlers Inn.  Zoe plays everything from traditional folk tunes, ballads, world beat and also vaudeville.  Zoe even sings a song about pie!  Does it get any better?

Here are a couple of videos…

Monday, July 25

Global Village marks the birthday of Rita Marley with music she did under her own name and as part of the I-Threes, the vocal trio that backed Bob Marley & the Wailers. Plus more music for the July Santana feature - including covers of his songs from Angelique Kidjo and Africando and music from the Corazon and Caravanserai albums – and a new roots reggae set from Quantic and a new release from acclaimed African guitarist Djelimady Tounkara.

Tuesday, July 26

Monday 7.25.16

Night Train marks birthdays of contemporary jazz drummer Brian Blade, vocalist Annie Ross (of the famed vocalese group Lambert, Hendricks & Ross) and Ellington saxophonist Johnny Hodges. Plus more jazz guitar for the Charlie Christian Centennial birthday celebration (including John Scofield, Charlie Hunter’s new album, the Howard Alden/Andy Brown Quartet, and Christian with the Benny Goodman Sextet) – and new music from the Organik Vibe Trio, The Hot Sardines, Cyrus Chestnut and Andy Narell.

Tuesday 7.26.16

Buddy Guy Grand Finale

Jul 25, 2016

July 29/31

Buddy Guy’s 80th birthday is this Saturday (July 30) and Crossroads wraps up its month-long celebration with more music from Guy in hour one of the show (including music he did in Junior Wells’ band, as part of Buddy and the Juniors, and from several of his own albums) – and then in hour two of the show, it’s a Buddy Guy special exploring his life and music.

James Chiang

Paul Gilbert has one of the most stylistically diverse discographies in rock guitar. From his time in the shred outfit Racer X to his Top 40 success with Mr. Big and beyond, Gilbert has carved path that sees him moving with ease from the guitar heavy music of the 1970s to the layered, multi-faceted world of smart singer-songwriters such as Todd Rundgren. His latest release is I Can Destroy, an album that finds the Illinois-born musician’s senses of facility and humor intact.

Noteworthy

Carla Eckels / KMUW

Then And Now: The Summer Of Justice

Twenty-five years ago, thousands of people came to the Summer of Mercy abortion protests in Wichita. This week, Operation Save America is back in the city to demonstrate, pray, and to stop abortions.
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