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Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Wichita Women's March One Year Later: Once Anger, Now Action

The pink hats were the same. Many of the signs, too: "I resist." "I'm with her." "Girls just want to have fun(damental) rights." But Saturday's 500-person rally in front of City Hall in downtown Wichita had a decidedly different feel than last year's Women's March.

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Now that we’re past Thanksgiving, it’s time to turn toward the season of Mr. C.

Thai House

Nov 19, 2010
Tanya Tandoc / KMUW

I love spicy food.  I love it when I eat something so hot that I get a little high from it, or start to hallucinate just a little.  I want to sweat and pant as I eat.  It may seem sadomasochistic to you, but it’s my kind of fun. If I eat enough chilies, people seem funnier and prettier and project fuzzy pink auras.  I’m not kidding.  I do it all the time.

There’s no way I could not take a walk this morning. Aside from the intensive lobbying of my Airedale friend Ollie, the blue Kansas sky and ruby leaves of our pin oaks overpowered me. So I hitched Ollie to the leash and out we went, fully engulfed in another splendid crispy November autumn morning.

Sport Burger

Nov 5, 2010

I have found that most people like to talk about food.  If you can’t think of anything clever to say at a party, you can always break the social ice by asking people what they like to eat.  It’s a nice way to start a conversation, and you might even learn something.

How exactly do robo-calls help politicians? You know what I’m talking about—those automated, prerecorded phone messages we get on our landlines (those of us who still have landlines).

I don’t know anyone who ever says, “Wow, I got the nicest, most informative robo-call the other day.  The information was so pertinent and it really convinced me that that person was the right one for the job!”

I lost a good friend last week and, in a way, so did you. His name was Arthur Schuetz. He died six days from his 99th birthday.

He was my neighbor for years in the College Hill area. Art lived a quiet life, to my knowledge never making any newscast, never getting his photo and name splashed across the newspapers, never running for public office, never having streets or schools or businesses named for himself.

Paleteria La Reyna

Oct 8, 2010

I’ve been walking a lot lately, and not just because the weather is finally behaving.  I’ve been trying to balance the amount of exercise I get with the number of popsicles I have been eating.  This summer was the summer of the the paleta for me.  A paleta is a Mexican popsicle, and I have been quite obsessed with them, to the point where I was eating one a day during the month of August, hence, the new exercise regime.

Greetings from The Land That Time Forgot, also known as Wichita, Kansas. We’ve been a little slow to accept some of them new-fangled things that other towns have had for years. Take bicycles, for instance. We weren’t too sure they’d catch on so we waited a while. Then the other day I noticed an actual bike lane on First Street in the College Hill area. Right there against the curb was the white outline of a bicycle indicating a bike lane. At first I thought it was a crime scene. Like on TV where the police draw a chalk outline around the victim, in this case a bicycle.

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Commentary

Movie Review: 'The Post'

Steven Spielberg’s The Post seems specifically engineered to be the most Oscar bait-y of Oscar bait movies. Spielberg is arguably the most prominent director in the film industry, it features two of our biggest movie stars, Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks, and it deals in the grand themes that Spielberg so loves. Really, what could go wrong?

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KMUW Music

Roots, Radicals and Rockers: How Skiffle Changed the World

Billy Bragg, Faber & Faber Social

Skiffle remains a phenomenon largely foreign to American listeners. Here, musician and activist Billy Bragg describes the music that inspired the likes of Mick Jagger, Paul McCartney and countless others across England in the years after World War II. You can trace a direct line from this music to the early, amphetamine-fueled work of The Beatles straight down to the Sex Pistols.

If your music reading interests extend beyond the bounds of standard rock bios, the past year provided a rich array of choices. Here are 2017 books that explored the creation and meaning of music, and the lives and work of musicians outside the pop and rock mainstream.

THE MUSIC

Frankie and Johnny: Race, Gender, and the Work of African American Folklore in 1930s America

Stacy I. Morgan (University of Texas Press)

The song “Frankie and Johnny,” which appears to have its roots in an actual 1899 murder case, would have a life well beyond those of its protagonists, becoming one of the best known popular songs in America. Morgan’s book explores several iterations of the song in the 1930s: extended studies of Leadbelly’s iconic recording; Thomas Hart Benton’s Missouri State Capital mural; filmmaker John Huston’s theatrical adaptation; Mae West’s theater and film versions of the story; and a harrowing reworking of the tale in a poem from Harlem Renaissance writer Sterling Brown – along with briefer looks at a New Deal ballet by Ruth Page and Bentley Stone, and Ethel Waters recording (one of the only examples of the song done by an African-American woman at the time). The 1930s saw profound changes in America. The Harlem Renaissance and the Jazz Age had already begun to challenge views of race and gender, and the social and economic cauldron of the Depression, combined with a new interest in folk culture, music and lore, would give the song a prominent new place in popular culture, reflecting meanings of race and gender then, and shedding light on how we understand both now.

Tuesday, January 23

Global Village celebrates the birthday of gypsy jazz guitar great Django Reinhardt with music from the master himself and from his Hot Club of France partner – violinist Stephane Grappelli. We’ll also hear from some of the many contemporary artists and groups inspired by his music to offer both traditional and contemporary forms of his trademark ‘gypsy jazz’ sound, including Tchavolo Schmitt, Bireli Lagrene, Pearl Django,  the Hot Club of San Francisco, the Hot Club of Detroit, and Hot Club Sandwich.

Wednesday, January 24

Global Village devotes this show to the depth and breadth of music from  Haiti - from the nation’s ‘second national anthem,’ “Haiti Cheri,” through pioneers of modern Haitian music, to key international compilations that brought the music to the attention of a wider international audience, the bold “roots” bands, and some current hitmakers. Among the artists featured Nemours Jean-Baptiste, Tabou Combo, Les Vikings, Boukman Eksperyans, and Dat 7.

Thursday, January 25

Global Village marks the birthday of pianist, composer and bossa nova pioneer Antonio Carlos Jobim with performances from the legendary Brazilian artists and covers of some of his many classics from Stan Getz, Charlie Byrd, Sting, Quarteto Jobim Morelenbaum, and from 2017 releases from the Grammy-winning Jobim Orchestra, classical guitarist Berta Rojas, and John Pizzarelli’s celebration of the 50th anniversary of a classic album from Frank Sinatra with Jobim.

Friday, January 26

Global Village celebrates Australia Day with music from a wide array of artists from Down Under, including rock bands Mental as Anything, Midnight Oil, and Coloured Stone; indigenous artists Archie Roach and Gurrumjul; some didgeridoo sounds from Outback and Baraka Moon; and some Melbourne Latin from Quarter Street and San Lazaro.

Sunday, January 21

Sunday on Soulsations we remember gospel music icon Edwin Hawkins. He died Monday at the age of 74. Hawkins is widely-known for his arrangement of the hymn “Oh Happy Day.” The song, recorded by the Edwin Hawkins Singers, became an international hit in 1969.

“They’re all some of the most difficult pieces that I play,” says pianist Christopher O’Riley, discussing his preparation for a recital spotlighting the music of Radiohead.

The Los Angeles-based musician has been arranging/interpreting/performing Radiohead’s music since the early 2000s. “I really like to think that this is an infinitesimally slowed-down improvisation because I really am making note choices, harmony choices from one sixteenth note to the next.”

Noteworthy

City of Wichita

Wichita Puts Firehouse Up For Sale To Spur Development

The city of Wichita is looking to developers to revitalize an area near the Commerce Arts District and Intrust Bank Arena.

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