Top Stories

Kansas News Service/File photo

Federal Judge: Kansas Cannot Require Proof Of Citizenship To Vote

A federal judge ruled Monday that Kansas cannot require documentary proof of U.S. citizenship to register to vote, finding such laws violate the constitutional right to vote in a ruling with national implications. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson is the latest setback for Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who has championed such laws and led President Donald Trump's now-defunct voter fraud commission. The 118-page decision came in two consolidated cases challenging a...

Read More

Manna Wok

Sep 24, 2010
Fletcher Powell / KMUW

If you didn’t already know this, I’m half Asian-- half Filipino, specifically. I grew up eating rice with every meal, fish with heads on, chicken with feet on, fermented things, and every soy product known to man.  My parents are adventurous eaters, so my brother and sister and I ate all kinds of weird stuff from the get-go.  There is no food I won’t try at least once.

My Tho

Sep 10, 2010

I have good news. We are seriously blessed with wonderful Vietnamese food in Wichita.

If you are unfamiliar with Vietnamese cooking, it is easy to like, even for a beginner. It’s fresh and healthy, relying on noodles and rice, small amounts of meat, and lots of vegetables and fresh herbs. Oftentimes raw ingredients will be used to garnish cooked dishes by the diner to her own tastes, so it’s a great cuisine for people who like to play with their food.

Isn’t passion great? Not the romantic kind of “oh, baby, I love you, I love you” passion, but the everyday sort of passion that people feel for practically every kind of imaginable thing.

Lots of good folks locally feel pretty strongly about college football. Some of them are convinced that Wichita State University made a wrong-headed move when it punted its own football program into the trash bin of history at the end of the 1986 season.

There is always a conspicuous absence of WSU on the sports pages this time of year as Kansas State and KU become the subjects of endless speculation about this season’s football teams.

The unprecedented nastiness of this season’s primary campaign seems noteworthy. Has there ever been a political atmosphere as charged with negativity as this one? Have there ever been so many candidates who’ve had so little to say about what they are actually in favor of? Okay, we did hear some platitudes about “Kansas values.” But mostly we heard negative messages telling us what they were against. They were against President Obama. They were against health care reform. They were against taxation. They were against undocumented immigrants.

Wichita Public Library

Wichita has a long and proud history as a baseball town-- from club games in the 1870s, to serving as the home of the NBC Tournament since its beginning in 1935, to the national championship success of Wichita State University. But last month marked the anniversary of a lost piece of Wichita baseball history that almost seems too strange to be true: A game in 1925 between the Wichita Monrovians-- an all African-American professional team-- and the Wichita chapter of the Ku Klux Klan.

Pages

Commentary

@chollette / femdotdot.com

Femdot's Delacreme 2 | NAS

I’ve been really impressed with the hip hop coming out of Chicago lately--emcees like Mick Jenkins, Noname and of course Chance the Rapper have developed a wonderful and distinct sound and emotional range that feels rare in contemporary hip hop.

Read More

KMUW Music

Monday 6.18.18

Night Train continues the June Caribbean American Heritage Month feature with music from Jamaican-born artists Monty Alexander, Dizzy Reece and Joe Harriott, the Mozayik Haitian jazz group, Dominican pianist Michel Camilo, Puerto Rican saxophonist David Sanchez, and a fascinating new album exploring the connections between Caribbean and Chinese music from Dongfeng Liu.  Plus new tribute albums from Eddie Daniels (for Egberto Gismonti) and Don Braden (Stevie Wonder, and Earth, Wind & Fire), along with the latest from Kenny Barron, Wali Ali, and the Barrett Martin Group.

Tuesday 6.19.18

Night Train highlights standards tonight – both classic recordings of these songs and new versions of old favorites. Among the artists featured, guitarist Kenny Burrell, Dinah Washington, Etta Jones, Art Blakey, Antonio Adolfo, Houston Person with Ron Carter, Gene Ammons and Jimmy Smith.

Wednesday 6.20.18

Night Train marks the birthday of saxophone, flute and bass clarinet great Eric Dolphy with music he did early in his career with Chico Hamilton, later with Charles Mingus, and also as a leader.  Plus more music for the Caribbean American Heritage Month feature – this time from the Essence All Stars Afro Cubano Chant album, from the Caribbean All Stars, and from Latin jazz great Tito Puente, including a Jazz Profiles special about him in hour two of the show. Also two impressive new albums from pianists Bill Anschell and Bill O’Connell.

Thursday 6.21.18

Night Train joins in with Global Village and Strange Currency to celebrate the first day of summer with a program devoted to summer songs from Kenny Burrell, Shirley Horn, Pat Metheny, Marian McPartland, Oscar Peterson, the Godfathers of Groove, and more.

Monday, June 18

Global Village continues the June Caribbean Heritage Month feature with a trip to Haiti. We’ll hear music from featured group Tabou Combo, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year; the roots music group Chouk Bwa Libete, featured next week in the next edition of our special series, Global Village at the Savannah Music Festival; one of the legends of Haitian music, Nemours Jean-Baptiste; and the Creole Choir of Cuba, a vocal group made up of Cubans of Haitian descent.

Tuesday, June 19

Global Village continues the June Caribbean Heritage Month feature with a trip to Jamaica to celebrate the birthday of guitar great Ernest Ranglin. The show features music from his solo projects, as well work he did as lead guitarist and musical director for Jimmy Cliff, and as a guest artist with the Skatalites, Monty Alexander, the Melodians, Millie Small, Jackie Mittoo and more.

Wednesday, June 20

Global Village marks World Refugee Day with music from artists from many different corners of the world who were once refugees. Among the artists featured: the Refugees for Refugees project, Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars, NEA Heritage Fellow Rahim Alhaj, Western Sahara’s Aziza Brahim, Ugandan artist Samite and more.

Thursday, June 21

Global Village welcomes in the new season with songs of summer from Bob Marley & the Wailers, Desmond Dekker, Ray Barretto, Bill Withers, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Michael Franti & Spearhead and more.

(Strange Currency & Night Train also have summer specials tonight.)

Friday, June 22

It’s Take Your Dog to Work Day and Global Village (and four legged friends) howl along to songs from Jesse Winchester, the Roches, Rufus Thomas, Nick Drake, Big Mama Thornton and more. Plus music from African greats Orchestra Baobab and King Sunny Ade, the Balkan-inspired group Tipsy Oxcart, kora player Seckou Keita, and the Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten Cambodian rock soundtrack.

June 22/24

Crossroads continues the June Caribbean American Heritage Month feature with more music from the Crescent City, including ‘the Soul Queen of New Orleans’ Irma Thomas, bluesman Walter ‘Wolfman’ Washington, the Soul Rebels, the Neville Brothers, and in hour two, a special feature Cyril Neville.

Crossroads also continues its month-long tributes to Chicago bluesman Eddy ‘the Chief’ Clearwater, and gospel singer and cofounder of the Blind Boys of Alabama, Clarence Fountain, who both passed away at the beginning of the month.

And there’s new music from Bettye LaVette, Sue Foley, Mike Zito, and Lurrie Bell & the Bell Dynasty.

Tuesday, June 19

We remember Matt “Guitar” Murphy, who died on Friday, June 15. Although perhaps most widely known for his work with The Blues Brothers, Murphy also performed alongside Muddy Waters, Memphis Slim and Willie Dixon among others. Plus: Selections featuring Murphy’s Blues Brothers bandmate, Steve Cropper.

Wednesday, June 20 

Released in 1993, Rumble Doll is the debut album from Patti Scialfa and features performances from members of Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers as well as members of Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band. Springsteen, who Scialfa married in 1991, also appears. We’ll hear selections from that recording as well as Slim Dunlap’s 1993 solo debut, The Old New Me.

Thursday, June 21

We celebrate the first day of summer with selections from The Jam, X, BB King and The Alarm.

Friday, June 22

Arthur Buck is the new collaboration between singer-songwriter Joseph Arthur and former REM guitarist Peter Buck. We’ll hear music from the duo’s debut album as well as selections from REM’s Life’s Rich Pagaent LP.

Saturday, June 23

Hollow Bones is the latest release by singer-songwriter Maria Elena. We’ll hear selections from that as well as from Shane Marler’s latest, One Stop.

Monday, June 25

Up To The Sky is the new recording from cellist Serena Jost. Listen for music from that release as well as from Zoe Keating’s 2010 effort, Into The Trees.

Anson Brody

Based in Fort Worth, Texas singer-songwriter Tommy Luke’s songs recall the dusty, well-worn sounds of western music. His earthy voice drives the narrative of songs such as “The Ground,” “I Don’t Know (I Had It All)” and “Oklahoma Hula Hoopin’ Angel” with a confidence and honesty that recalls Kris Kristofferson’s best, early work.

You might be forgiven for thinking that his work emerged from an earlier time in music. It’s unencumbered by the trappings of contemporary music and free of the irony that some bring to traditional music. This is to say that there’s an undeniable appeal to the songs that populate his album Life Ain’t Hard and his live shows.

Speaking from his Texas home, Luke, who performs at Barleycorn’s on Thursday, June 14, says that he’s looking forward to returning to Wichita for the concert.

Noteworthy

Mirna Bonilla Salazar, K-State Research and Extension / Kansas State University

Immigration To Southwest Kansas Is Creating A New Accent

Southwest Kansas has a new accent due to the rapidly growing Latino population in the area. New research from Kansas State University and its Kansas Speaks Project, which documents language shifts in Kansas, shows younger people in the region have started to take on the characteristics of Spanish speakers, even if they don’t speak Spanish themselves.

Read More