Jim McLean, File Photo / KHI News Service

Sedgwick County’s Election Commissioner is issuing a vote of confidence in the equipment that will be used in local elections.

Tabitha Lehman told the Sedgwick County Commission Wednesday that every piece of voting equipment that is used in the county gets inspected and tested prior to Election Day. She says they test the machines and software to make sure the choices on the ballot are accurate.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

A federal judge has revived a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a Kansas law requiring prospective voters to prove they are U.S. citizens.

U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson on Wednesday gave Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach a pass for failing to file a timely response to the lawsuit. She set aside a court clerk's default judgment issued last week against the state.

Robinson says the case is of constitutional significance and public interest, and that it deserves to be decided on the merits and not through procedural default.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Some high-ranking Republicans have said tax policy is on the table as lawmakers work to eliminate a state budget deficit. But as Stephen Koranda reports, they aren’t endorsing a tax increase.

Senate President Susan Wagle previously said all options for Kansas budget balancing are up for consideration.

This week, Gov. Sam Brownback said he’s not ruling anything out when it comes to the budget. But Brownback pushed for the tax cuts, and he is not saying he likes the idea of modifying them.

Abigail Beckman / KMUW

The iconic Joan Miró mural "Personnages Oiseaux" is returning to the face of the Ulrich Museum of Art and will reclaim its place as one of the most recognizable icons on the Wichita State University campus. For almost a decade, an art conservation company has been working to stabilize the outdoor mosaic while retaining the integrity of the original piece.

Hugo Phan / KMUW/File photo

Kansas Governor Sam Brownback is backing fellow Republican Donald Trump in the presidential race, but Brownback isn’t supporting Trump’s claims of a “rigged” election. Brownback tells reporters that he has faith in the voting system.

“I don’t doubt that there’s problems in some places, but I’ve been on the ballot a lot and I think overall the system operates well,” Brownback says.

The Racial Profiling Advisory Board of Wichita will hold a meeting Thursday to continue to address several citizen concerns, including challenges with suspended and revoked driver’s licenses and civil asset forfeiture.

Board member Juanita Ridge says the meetings are held in part to help people bogged down with red tape and a lack of resources to get their needs met. In September, the board partnered with the Kansas Department of Revenue. The agency came to Wichita and issued restricted driver’s licenses to applicants on the spot.


The City of Wichita is deciding between two developers for a new project in Delano. Now, they’re asking for the public’s help in choosing the finalist.

The so-called Delano Catalyst Site sits northwest the intersection of Douglas Avenue and McLean, just between the new $37 million Advanced Learning Library and the $38 million River Vista project.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Wichita City Council members have approved the purchase of $7 million worth of equipment for the fire department.

Fire Chief Ron Blackwell says the funds will go partly toward replacing a command truck that was purchased in 1993.

“The current unit lacks the technology that is available to us today that can be really beneficial in a number of emergency situations, including hazardous materials, rescue, high-rise building fires and other special needs," he told the City Council at its meeting Tuesday.


This year’s presidential race may be one for the history books. But it’s not the contest Kansas voters wanted.

When Republicans caucused in March, they overwhelmingly preferred Texas Sen. Ted Cruz over eventual nominee Donald Trump.

Kansas Democrats gave Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders one of his biggest primary victories: a 68 percent to 32 percent drubbing of Hillary Clinton.

Hannah Figgs-Hoard was among a group of Sanders supporters at a Topeka caucus site that literally overwhelmed Clinton’s smaller contingent.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Two former Kansas attorneys general, a Democrat and a Republican, say Kansas Supreme Court justices should keep their jobs. Five justices face retention elections this November.

The two former politicians have joined a campaign by the group Kansans for Fair Courts.

Former Attorneys General Bob Stephan and Steve Six say the Kansas justices have been fair and impartial in their rulings. They say a very small number of the court’s decision have been overturned on appeal, which shows the justices are doing good work.