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The three finalists in the search for the next Wichita police chief were announced Thursday morning.

Marion Doss, flickr Creative Commons

Topeka Zoo officials are denying claims that the zoo's two elephants are suffering from a lack of social interaction.

Animal rights group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals wrote to Topeka Zoo director Brendan Wiley earlier this month, asking for a meeting to discuss elephants Tembo and Sunda, The Topeka Capital-Journal reported. They say the elephants are "afflicted with loneliness, boredom, and depression," and need a third elephant to interact with.

Carla Eckels

The Kansas African American Museum held a community discussion on Wednesday about a civil rights trail tour taken by Wichitans to Alabama. The summer trip yielded Kansas ties.

The diverse group went to historic sites in Birmingham, Selma and Montgomery. Museum Director Mark McCormick says the group's tour of Selma included a Wichita dimension: A monument, featured in last year's Selma movie, is dedicated to Wichita Rev. James Reeb, a martyr of the civil rights movement.

McCormick says a Recall drugstore in Selma links back to Wichita’s 1958 Dockum Drugstore sit-in.

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Wichita State University's Student Government Association is planning to honor a fellow student who was killed in a terrorist attack in Saudi Arabia earlier this year.

KIMHIRO HOSHINO AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Leaders in the Kansas capital city say it’s not OK to bare it all. The Topeka City Council has voted to ban public nudity. City Council members referenced an increased number of complaints about nudity recently. Councilman Jeff Coen pointed to an example on the busy shopping strip Wanamaker Road.

“I am a huge supporter of individual liberties, but jogging naked down Wanamaker disrupts the quality of life for the rest of us,” says Coen.

Webb Garlinghouse, who’s associated with a clothing-free camp outside Topeka, calls the ordinance “highly discriminatory.”

DoDEA Pacific, flickr Creative Commons

Top Republican legislators are asking Kansas school districts seeking extra state aid to provide information about how they've become more efficient in recent years.

Four GOP legislative leaders sent a letter Wednesday to the superintendents of 38 school districts that have applied for extra aid under the state's new education funding law. The districts are seeking about $15 million in funds, but only $12.3 million is available under the law.

The Associated Press obtained a copy of the letter after the state Department of Education sent it.

Lindsay Fox, flickr Creative Commons

The Topeka City Council has voted to ban e-cigarettes in all public places where normal cigarettes are already banned.

The council heard from supporters of a ban, including Mary Jane Hellebust, a former director of the Tobacco Free Kansas Coalition. She told commissioners that it still isn’t known if the vapors from e-cigarettes are safe.

“It is better if we keep these vapors out of the public places until we have decades, literally, of research to show that they are safe. Go back to the old maxim: better safe than sorry,” Hellebust says.

kscourts.org

One of the longest-serving members of the Kansas Supreme Court has died. Former Chief Justice Kay McFarland died Tuesday.

McFarland was the first woman to serve on the state's highest court and the first female chief justice in Kansas.

McFarland graduated from Washburn Law School where she was the only woman attending classes full time. She was the first woman elected as a Shawnee County district judge in 1972 and was appointed to the Kansas Supreme Court in 1977.

David Wolff - Patrick/Redferns via Getty Images

Nearly 50 years into life as a professional musician, Peter Frampton is still uncovering new facets of his playing and his music. This summer he’s been criss-crossing the country performing live dates to packed houses with his electrifying brand of rock music, but during his downtime from the road he’s been preparing for his first-ever acoustic album.

Ty Nigh, flickr Creative Commons

The city of Wichita approved a Capital Improvement Program Tuesday afternoon that accounts for $1.9 billion in potential spending.

The Capital Improvement Program is meant to prioritize city projects for the next decade. While the funding isn’t guaranteed, it’s used as a wish list of sorts for improving Wichita. It includes millions of dollars for parks, water and sewer improvements, bike paths and public safety. But the plan’s main focus is improving streets and highways.

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