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Christopher Sessums, flickr Creative Commons

Representatives of five school boards in Shawnee County are asking Kansas lawmakers for a quick resolution to the school funding dispute.

Patrick Woods, president of the Topeka Public Schools Board of Education, says they want lawmakers to go back to the old formula for reducing certain disparities among districts. That will cost nearly $40 million.

wichita.edu

Eric Sexton, vice president for student affairs at Wichita State University, is stepping down.

Sexton announced his resignation Tuesday, a little more than a year after taking over the position. It will go into effect mid-July.

“It is time for me to change the trajectory of my professional life,” Sexton said in his resignation letter. “I want to sincerely thank the countless students, faculty, staff and alumni who have helped me. I will always be a Shocker.”

Dozens of central and western Kansas school superintendents say they have no intention of following U.S. Rep. Tim Huelskamp's advice to disregard a recent transgender bathroom directive from President Barack Obama's administration.

The Topeka Capital-Journal reached out to 129 school superintendents who were given the Republican congressman's letter and received responses from 30 of them.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Kansas lawmakers will return to the Statehouse later this week for a special session focused on education spending, and they’ll have to overcome some significant divisions to reach an agreement. The state Supreme Court says they need to reduce inequalities among school districts by the end of the month or schools could close.

DAN BOYCE / ROCKY MOUNTAIN PBS FOR HARVEST PUBLIC MEDIA

Hundreds of thousands of people go to work each day preparing the beef, pork and poultry that ends up on our dinner tables. Their workplace is among the most hazardous in the country.

Slaughterhouses, while safer than they were decades ago, exact a steep price from workers--sometimes, even their lives. In the first part of the series Dangerous Jobs, Cheap Meat, Harvest Public Media’s Luke Runyon takes a look at one tragic case in Colorado.

salvationarmyusa.org

Wichita’s Salvation Army is opening its doors for people to get out of the heat.

Three Salvation Army locations across the city will serve as cooling stations in the afternoon for people without homes or without access to air conditioning. Janet Pack, director of development for the Salvation Army in Wichita, says snacks and ice water will be available, and visitors can request a box fan.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

Legislative experts are available to answer questions about the Kansas special session.

Cindy Roupe is with the State Library of Kansas, which operates a legislative hotline. She says librarians can provide information such as how to contact a legislator, what bill numbers are being considered and how the legislative process works.

“Because if you don’t deal with this day-in and day-out, you don’t really understand what a conference committee does, how a conference committee works. We can help them through that process,” Roupe sats.

Ken Hawkins, Creative Commons

A settlement has been reached in a claim against e-book publishers and Apple Inc. Kansas consumers will be able to receive refund checks or account credits.

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt on Monday released information about the price-fixing case against Apple. Kansas and 32 other states sued Apple for its participation in a conspiracy with publishers to charge more for electronic books than the market rate.

Apple appealed the case, but when the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear it, the settlement became final.

LID / flickr Creative Commons

Time is running out for Congress to get a bill passed requiring food with genetically modified ingredients to be labeled.

July 1 is when a mandatory GMO labeling law kicks in in Vermont, so Congress has been trying to get something on the books before then in hopes of setting a national standard. Without that, food companies warn of “chaos” in the marketplace.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

Kansas farmers may be facing some of toughest financial times they have experienced in three decades. As Harvest Public Media’s Jeremy Bernfeld reports, that could put a hit on the economy.

The average net farm income in Kansas plummeted last year to just over $4,500. That’s a year-over-year drop of 96 percent, according to a report by the Kansas Farm Management Association.

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