The Two-Way
12:12 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

LISTEN: NPR Hosts, Reporters Take On 'Call Me Maybe'

Carly Rae Jepsen.
Vanessa Heins Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 9:48 am

It could very well end up being the song of this summer. Carly Rae Jepsen's "Call Me Maybe," a sunny pop song about a nascent crush, is No. 2 on the pop charts and No. 1 on iTunes.

But, perhaps the bigger sign that it has just crept everywhere is when someone on the Internet mashes up a President Obama remix.

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The Salt
12:10 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

Our Obama Family Dinner Survey Shows Brown Rice Is Still A Tough Sell

First Lady Michelle Obama, here with students from Bancroft Elementary School and Kimball Elementary School, has done a lot to promote healthy family dinners and garden-fresh food.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

More than 10,000 of you took our recent survey about how your family meals stack up against the Obamas'. And it turns out, you're a pretty healthy bunch.

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Politician Remembered
12:06 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

Retired KS Politician Remembered

Kansas Statehouse
Jimmywayne Flickr

Family, friends and colleagues from across the nation are remembering retired Kansas politician Billy McCray who died June 2.

Funeral services for McCray will be held in Wichita Friday morning.

The long time Democrat, served in the state legislature for 18 years both in the House and Senate. He worked for the Boeing Company in the 1950’s.

Former state Senator, Rip Gooch said he and his friend were in unique positions at Boeing for people of color at that time; Gooch was a flight inspector and McCray a photographer.

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The Two-Way
11:45 am
Fri June 8, 2012

'She Hit Me First,' Greek Slapper Says

YouTube.com

This sounds like something we said in first grade:

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Renee Montagne is co-host of NPR's Morning Edition, the most widely heard radio news program in the U.S. She has hosted the newsmagazine since 2004, broadcasting from NPR West in Culver City, California, with co-host Steve Inskeep in NPR's Washington, D.C. headquarters.

Montagne is a familiar voice on NPR, having reported and hosted since the mid-1980s. She hosted All Things Considered with Robert Siegel for two years in the late 1980s, and previously worked for NPR's Science, National and Foreign desks.

As NPR's correspondent covering campaign finance and lobbying, Peter Overby totes around a business card that reads Power, Money & Influence Correspondent. Some of his lobbyist sources call it the best job title in Washington.

Overby was awarded an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia silver baton for his coverage of the 2000 campaign and the 2001 Senate vote to tighten the rules on campaign finance. The citation said his reporting "set the bar" for the beat.

In 2008, he teamed up with the Center for Investigative Reporting on the Secret Money Project, an extended multimedia investigation of outside-money groups in federal elections.

Lizzie Skurnick's reviews and essays have appeared in The New York Times Book Review, The Chicago Tribune, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, and "many other appallingly underpaying publications," she says. Her books blog, Old Hag, is a Forbes Best of the Web pick and has been anthologized in Vintage's Ultimate Blogs: Masterworks from the Wild Web. She writes a column on vintage young-adult fiction for Jezebel.com, a job she has been preparing for her entire life. She is on the board of the National Book Critics Circle.

Cheryl Corley is an NPR correspondent who works for the National Desk and is based in Chicago. She travels throughout the Midwest covering issues and events throughout the region's 12 states.

In recent years, Corley has reported on the campaign and re-election of President Barack Obama, on the efforts by Illinois officials to rethink the state's Juvenile Justice System, on youth violence in Chicago, and on political turmoil in the Illinois state government. She's reported on the infamous Trayvon Martin shooting case in Florida and covered tornadoes that have destroyed homes and claimed lives in Harrisburg, Illinois; small towns in Oklahoma; and Joplin, Missouri.

Remembrances
11:41 am
Fri June 8, 2012

Ray Bradbury: 'It's Lack That Gives Us Inspiration'

"I'd like to come back every 50 years and see how we can use certain technological advantages to our advantage," said science-fiction author Ray Bradbury. He died Tuesday at age 91.
Steve Castillo AP

Originally published on Fri June 8, 2012 1:27 pm

This interview was originally broadcast in 1988.

Ray Bradbury didn't like negative people. The science-fiction writer and author of Fahrenheit 451 told Terry Gross in 1988 that he found out about negative people in fourth grade, shortly after his classmates started making fun of him for collecting Buck Rogers comic strips.

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Politics
11:41 am
Fri June 8, 2012

President Turns To Fashionistas For Support

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Later in the program, we're going to check in with the leader of a group of Catholic nuns who are heading out on a bus tour to protest budget cuts to programs that help the poor - this, even as the Vatican singled them out for paying too much attention to social justice issues, and not enough to social issues like abortion and same-sex marriage. We'll ask why they're doing it, and what they say about the Vatican's rebuke. That's our Faith Matters conversation in just a few minutes.

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