Beth Golay

Director of Marketing and Digital Content

Beth Golay serves as KMUW's Director of Marketing and Digital Content.

She is the founder and editor of Books & Whatnot, providing marketing support to bookstores around the world through her newsletter and website. Prior to launching Books & Whatnot, Beth was the marketing manager at Watermark Books & Cafe for 13 years. In fact, she represented Watermark as the KMUW book review commentator for 2 years while she was at the bookstore.

Beth's favorite genre is literary fiction, but she also loves creative non-fiction and reading the classics she should have attempted a long time ago. Her greatest reading accomplishment is a toss-up: Reading four books in one weekend (documented in January 2004) or completing the 1438 pages of Dumas’ The Count of Monte Cristo.

In addition to "reader" you can add "artist" and "runner" to her interest list. Beth is currently trying to run a marathon in every state. She has a long way to go.

Ways to Connect

Marginalia: Mohsin Hamid

May 16, 2017

In this podcast, I was able to visit by phone with Mohsin Hamid from his home in Lahore, Pakistan about his new novel, Exit West. The novel follows a young couple who fall in love in an unstable country and decide to migrate to other lands through magical portals. We visited about these literal open doors, human migration--especially in light of recent talk of proposed walls and travel bans, and children’s literature.

Here’s our conversation:

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That was Mohsin Hamid, author of a new novel Exit West which was published by Riverhead Books.

In this podcast, I visited with Patricia Lockwood about her new memoir, Priestdaddy. You see, her father is a married priest... rare, but not unheard of in the Catholic church. A few years ago, unusual circumstances forced Lockwood and her husband to move back home with her parents… only this home was a rectory in the Kansas City, Missouri diocese. Although she’s known for her fiction--and her tweets--Lockwood spent her time at ‘home’ penning this memoir.

Here’s our conversation:

And if you listened to the commentary on air, this is what you heard:

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Marginalia: Ulrich Boser

Apr 28, 2017

In this podcast, I visited with Ulrich Boser about his new book, Learn Better: Mastering the Skills for Success in Life, Business, and School, or, How to Become an Expert in Just about Anything.

Christopher Anderson Magnum Photos

In this podcast, I visited with Michael Finkel about his new book, The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit. The story is really Christopher Knight’s story. In 1986, Knight was 20 years old. He left his home and job in Massachusetts, drove to Maine, left his keys in his unlocked car and walked into the woods where he didn’t speak with another human being for 27 years. Okay, there was one time he encountered a hiker and said, “hi”--so that’s one syllable in 27 years.

Marginalia: Josh Barkan

Mar 17, 2017

In today’s podcast, I visited with Josh Barkan about his new book of stories, Mexico. He has divided his time between the United States and Mexico for several years, and many of these stories were derived from personal experience, as Josh explains in our conversation.

Here he is:

And if you listened to the Marginalia on air, here's what you heard:

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Mexico: Stories was published by Hogarth.

Thanks for joining us for Marginalia. Discover new episodes at kmuw.org or through iTunes. Marginalia was produced at KMUW - Wichita.

Anna Ty Bergman

When retracing her steps back to her initial love of literature, author Lyndsay Faye says it began with her father when she was 10 years old.

“When I was done with Nancy Drew he essentially told me that I should read the Sherlock Holmes mysteries. And I said, 'Well yeah, that sounds like a great idea.' And my uncle gave me a very pretty copy of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes," says Faye. "And I'm grateful to both of them because it just changed my entire life."

Marginalia: Elan Mastai

Mar 3, 2017
David Leyes

Although All Our Wrong Todays is Elan Mastai’s first novel, it’s not his first go at telling a story. It’s just a different medium. You see, Mastai comes to literature from the movie industry. He has written and produced movies such as “Alone in the Dark,” “The Samaritan” and “What If.” Perhaps it’s his background in film that makes All Our Wrong Todays so visually appealing. And there’s not an image to be seen.

With over 110 million copies of his books in print, chances are you’ve heard the name of author David Baldacci. His first book, Absolute Power, was adapted into a film starring Clint Eastwood. His books have been published in over 45 languages and in more than 80 countries. But it was because of this literary success that Baldacci wanted to avoid preferential treatment when it came to publishing his Vega Jane series for young readers.

Marginalia: Alex George

Feb 17, 2017
Shane Epping

Alex George is a novelist, a teacher, a lawyer, and founder of the Unbound Book Festival, which is held in Columbia, Missouri. 

Novelist. Teacher. Lawyer. Book Festival Founder. These are not small jobs. How does one juggle them all? I recently asked Alex George that question and more about his latest his latest book, Setting Free the Kites. Here’s our conversation:

And if you listened to the commentary on-air, this is what you heard:

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Setting Free the Kites was published by Putnam.

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