Beth Golay

Director of Marketing and Digital Content

Beth Golay serves as KMUW's Director of Marketing and Digital Content. She is also host of the KMUW podcast, Marginalia.

She is the founder and editor of Books & Whatnot, providing marketing support to bookstores around the world through her newsletter and website. Prior to launching Books & Whatnot, Beth was the marketing manager at Watermark Books & Cafe for 13 years. In fact, she represented Watermark as the KMUW book review commentator for 2 years while she was at the bookstore.

Beth's favorite genre is literary fiction, but she also loves creative non-fiction and reading the classics she should have attempted a long time ago. Her greatest reading accomplishment is a toss-up: Reading four books in one weekend (documented in January 2004) or completing the 1438 pages of Dumas’ The Count of Monte Cristo.

Beth is a founding member of the Ginger Rabbits art group and her work has been on exhibit in Wichita and Kansas City. She was the 2016-17 KMUW Pledge Drive artist with this work, SciFri25.

In addition to "reader" and "artist" you can include "runner" to her interest list. Beth is currently trying to run a marathon in every state. She has a long way to go.

Ways to Connect

Marginalia: Fiona Barton

20 hours ago
Jenny Lewis

Although she spent years working as a journalist, Fiona Barton only recently became a novelist last year with the publication of the psychological thriller, The Widow. And a second thriller, The Child, was just published a few weeks ago.

Matt Richman

The story resembles what is taught in history textbooks about Native Americans: the forced migrations, the pillaging of land and natural resources, the murderous treatment of the tribes. It’s the story of author David Grann’s new work of nonfiction, Killers of the Flower Moon, but this isn't colonial history. It took place less than 100 years ago just south of our Kansas border, in the Osage territory of Central Oklahoma.

Victoria Akbik Photography

KMUW’s Beth Golay explains how an author’s new suspense novel was influenced by her years living abroad as a military spouse.

Sean Mewshaw

Bill Roorbach is the author of many books of fiction and nonfiction. His novels include The Smallest Color, The Remedy for Love, and Life Among Giants. One of his story collections, Big Bend, won both the Flannery O’Connor and O. Henry prizes. His work has been featured in Harper’s, the Atlantic, the New York Times Magazine and was one of NPR’s Selected Shorts. I caught up with him recently through Skype at his home in Maine and we spoke his new collection of stories, The Girl of the Lake.

Michael Lionstar

Saints for All Occasions by J. Courtney Sullivan is the story of two Irish sisters--Nora and Theresa-- who journey by ship to the United States when they are 21 and 17 years old. Nora, the elder, is engaged to be married to an Irish neighbor who made the trip across the ocean before her. After spending decades in the states, the sisters are still faced with questions about what makes a family, and what it means to be an American.

I caught up with Sullivan while she was on tour for the book release. I’m Beth Golay, this is Marginalia, and here’s our conversation:  

Isan Brant

In his book, The Unsettlers: In Search of the Good Life in Today’s America, author Mark Sundeen set out to do just that. Find the good life. 

Fernando Salazar/The Wichita Eagle

At the end of December, I was tagged in a Facebook post by Suzanne Tobias, a reporter and columnist for The Wichita Eagle.

Marginalia: Mohsin Hamid

May 16, 2017

In this podcast, I was able to visit by phone with Mohsin Hamid from his home in Lahore, Pakistan about his new novel, Exit West. The novel follows a young couple who fall in love in an unstable country and decide to migrate to other lands through magical portals. We visited about these literal open doors, human migration--especially in light of recent talk of proposed walls and travel bans, and children’s literature.

Here’s our conversation:

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That was Mohsin Hamid, author of a new novel Exit West which was published by Riverhead Books.

In this podcast, I visited with Patricia Lockwood about her new memoir, Priestdaddy. You see, her father is a married priest... rare, but not unheard of in the Catholic church. A few years ago, unusual circumstances forced Lockwood and her husband to move back home with her parents… only this home was a rectory in the Kansas City, Missouri diocese. Although she’s known for her fiction--and her tweets--Lockwood spent her time at ‘home’ penning this memoir.

Here’s our conversation:

And if you listened to the commentary on air, this is what you heard:

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Marginalia: Ulrich Boser

Apr 28, 2017

In this podcast, I visited with Ulrich Boser about his new book, Learn Better: Mastering the Skills for Success in Life, Business, and School, or, How to Become an Expert in Just about Anything.

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