Beth Golay

Director of Marketing and Digital Content

Beth Golay serves as KMUW's Director of Marketing and Digital Content.

She is the founder and editor of Books & Whatnot, providing marketing support to bookstores around the world through her newsletter and website. Prior to launching Books & Whatnot, Beth was the marketing manager at Watermark Books & Cafe for 13 years. In fact, she represented Watermark as the KMUW book review commentator for 2 years while she was at the bookstore.

Beth's favorite genre is literary fiction, but she also loves creative non-fiction and reading the classics she should have attempted a long time ago. Her greatest reading accomplishment is a toss-up: Reading four books in one weekend (documented in January 2004) or completing the 1438 pages of Dumas’ The Count of Monte Cristo.

In addition to "reader" you can add "artist" and "runner" to her interest list. Beth is currently trying to run a marathon in every state. She has a long way to go.

Ways to Connect

Marginalia: Alex George

Feb 17, 2017
Shane Epping

Alex George is a novelist, a teacher, a lawyer, and founder of the Unbound Book Festival, which is held in Columbia, Missouri. 

Novelist. Teacher. Lawyer. Book Festival Founder. These are not small jobs. How does one juggle them all? I recently asked Alex George that question and more about his latest his latest book, Setting Free the Kites. Here’s our conversation:

And if you listened to the commentary on-air, this is what you heard:

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Setting Free the Kites was published by Putnam.

Adrian Harvey

I’ve been waiting for this moment forever. Well, since October… that’s almost forever. Right?

Last October, a bookseller friend recommended that I read Swimming Lessons by Claire Fuller. He was pretty insistent, and he tends to have impeccable reading taste, so I contacted the publisher to request an advance reading copy. The release date was February 7.

Emma Trim

We’ve all heard the warning, “Don’t judge a book by its cover.” We should probably add “don’t judge a book by it’s title” to the list of literary pitfalls to avoid. That’s especially the case with it comes to Brit Bennett’s The Mothers.

Marginalia: Keir Graff

Jan 20, 2017

Keir Graff is the executive editor for Booklist publications, the author of four books for adults, and also books for young readers. His second book for young readers, The Matchstick Castle, was just published on January 10.

I recently spoke with Keir about his job, the new book, and the differences between writing books for adults and young readers, and how The Matchstick Castle has found favor with a sometimes tougher audience… boys.

Here's our conversation:

And if you listened to the commentary on-air, this is what you heard:

Marginalia: Tim Harford

Jan 6, 2017
Fran Monks

Why does the word “messy” have such a negative connotation? Messy desks. Messy rooms. Messy lives. It shouldn’t, according to Tim Harford. In his new book, Messy: The Power of Disorder to Transform Our Lives, he uses research in neuroscience, psychology, and social science to explain why should embrace messiness instead of resist it. And how the creativity, responsiveness, and resilience we crave rely on the disorder, confusion, and disarray require to produce them.

 

 

One year ago, December 2015, we had an idea here at KMUW. 'Wouldn't it be great,' we thought, 'if we could talk with the authors of the books we were reading for Literary Feast? Wouldn't it be great if we could gain some insight before our book club discussion?'

And in that moment, Marginalia was born.

It was our first foray into podcasting, and we discovered that we love the platform. And we also discovered that we wanted to expand Marginalia to include other authors beyond Literary Feast.

 

Marginalia: Carol Birch

Dec 9, 2016
Emily Atherton

This episode features an conversation I had recently with Carol Birch. Birch is skilled at crafting fiction around historical fact, especially when there’s not enough factual information available. That was the case with her latest book, Orphans of the Carnival.

The novel looks at the life of Julia Pastrana. Born in Mexico in the 1930s, she could sing and dance, was fluent in three languages, and was billed as the Ugliest Woman in the World. It’s fiction based on fact, and against a backdrop of carnivals and freak shows, the story is stranger than fiction.

This episode was a bit of a departure to me. It features an interview I had recently with Kate DiCamillo about her book, Raymie Nightingale.

Some Girl Scouts from the area stopped by KMUW recently to participate in the Radio Day program. They spent some time in our studios recording their Thanksgiving memories.

Here's a sample from their day...

We think they did a great job and should wear their Radio Day badges proudly.

This episode features an interview I had recently with Candice Millard. Millard is not a typical historian. Her books tend to focus on the lesser-known moments in history. Teddy Roosevelt in the Amazon after his presidency, what really killed James Garfield, and her latest book, Hero of the Empire: The Boer War, a Daring Escape, and the Making of Winston Churchill. I asked Millard where she comes up with the ideas for her books. 

Here’s our conversation:

If you listened to the Marginalia commentary on-air, this is what you heard:

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