Beth Golay

Digital Content Marketing Manager

Beth Golay serves as KMUW's Digital Content Marketing Manager.

She is the founder and editor of Books & Whatnot, providing marketing support to bookstores around the world through her newsletter and website. Prior to launching Books & Whatnot, Beth was the marketing manager at Watermark Books & Cafe for 13 years. In fact, she represented Watermark as the KMUW book review commentator for 2 years while she was at the bookstore.

Beth's favorite genre is literary fiction, but she also loves creative non-fiction and reading the classics she should have attempted a long time ago. Her greatest reading accomplishment is a toss-up: Reading four books in one weekend (documented in January 2004) or completing the 1438 pages of Dumas’ The Count of Monte Cristo.

In addition to "reader" you can add "artist" and "runner" to her interest list. Beth is currently trying to run a marathon in every state. She has a long way to go.

Ways to Connect

 

This episode features a conversation I had recently with David Olimpio, an essayist whose prose is so lyrical he’s often labeled a poet. We spoke about his new book, This is Not a Confession. In it, David tackles some pretty intense themes: the sexual abuse inflicted by his babysitter; the death of his mother; his open marriage.

Essays in general are revealing…. exposing... divulging. But--as the title implies--David’s are not confessional. He’s not asking for pity. He doesn’t want forgiveness. If he’s looking for anything from the reader, perhaps it’s an attempt at understanding.

I think readers will agree that these essays are beautifully written. And I think David will agree, that he wrote these essays for himself.

Here’s our conversation.


    

This episode features a conversation I had recently with Dr. Frans de Waal, a Dutch primatologist and ethologist. You might recognize him as one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People. Or maybe you’ve watched one of his TED Talks. I caught up with him in Atlanta, where he’s the C.H. Candler Professor in Emory University’s Psychology Department and director of the Living Links Center at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. We visited about his most recent book--Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?--which explores methods, experiments, and tests used to measure animal intelligence. 

Here’s our conversation.  

This episode features a conversation I had recently with Carlo Rovelli, an Italian theoretical physicist and writer who has worked in Italy, the United States, and France. His work is mainly in the field of quantum gravity, where he is among the founders of the loop quantum gravity theory.

If your eyes started to glaze over at that last statement, stick around.

This episode of Marginalia features a nice chat I had recently with Laura Barnett about her first novel, The Versions of Us. The book actually features three stories that focus on one couple, Eva and Jim. The stories vary quite differently because at some random point during each story, a seemingly harmless decision was made which altered the characters’s course.

On this episode on Marginalia, I speak with Kristopher Jansma about his new novel, Why We Came to the City. The story focuses on five friends--an editor, an astronomer, a poet, an investment banker, and an artist--who have remained friends since their college graduation five years prior, and help each other navigate through life and dreams in New York City. When a seemingly innocuous lump below an eye turns into an delayed cancer diagnosis, the five must reexamine and redefine their hopes and dreams to accommodate tragedy and loss.

Marginalia: Idra Novey

May 13, 2016

Idra Novey is a poet. She also translates works from Spanish and Portuguese, and now, with a new novel, she’s writing fiction.

Ways to Disappear is a novel about a celebrated Brazilian writer who climbs up an almond tree holding a suitcase and a cigar to escape a growing gambling debt. This climb occurs in the opening pages of the book, and what follows is the search for the author conducted by her translator and her grown children.

I recently spoke with Novey about the book, her various genres, poetry…and climbing trees. Here’s our conversation.

    

Marginalia: Diane Rehm

May 11, 2016

This episode of Marginalia is a bit of a departure from our other episodes. Normally I feature a 2-way conversation between myself and an author. But because our listeners at KMUW hear this specific author 2 hours a day every Monday through Friday, this 2-way was turned into a news feature which was broadcast on air. Who was this special author? Public radio talk show host, Diane Rehm.

 

Public radio talk show host Diane Rehm started writing her book, On My Own, one night as she began her life on her own. Her husband of 54 years, John Rehm, was on his 10th day of refusing food, water, and medication. He had been suffering with Parkinson's disease for years. KMUW's Beth Golay spoke to Diane Rehm from her studio at WAMU in Washington.

Marginalia: Carrie Brown

Mar 10, 2016
© Aaron Mahler

Sir William Herschel was an astronomer who is best known for discovering Uranus and several moons while compiling a catalog of more than 2,500 celestial objects that is still in use today.

He was assisted for decades by his younger sister and fellow astronomer, Caroline Herschel. When he collected her from the family home in Germany to assist him in England, he liberated her from an awful existence , and she was forever grateful--and indebted--to him.

Randi Baird

Although she has written three books of nonfiction, Geraldine Brooks is best known as an author of historical fiction. But her brand of historical fiction has a way of enriching stories that are already familiar to readers, taking us along as she traces the spread of the bubonic plague to a small English village, or discovers the history of a 15th century Haggadah through the eyes of a book conservator, or as she follows the absent father in Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women to the battlefields of the Civil War. (She won a Pulitzer for that one.)

 

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