Chef Tom Jackson

Food Commentator

All Things Barbecue Staff Chef Tom Jackson is a Kansas native, born and raised in Wichita. In 2008 he and his wife moved to Portland, Oregon where he attended Oregon Culinary Institute. Tom studied both general culinary skills as well as baking and pastry while working as a cook in a variety of restaurants. After graduating from Oregon Culinary Institute he began working as a bread baker and pastry chef at the renowned Ken’s Artisan Bakery in northwest Portland. He spent more than four years honing his skills under James Beard Award winning chef and owner Ken Forkish. In that time he and his wife had their first child, and the draw of home and family grew stronger. Longtime friends of the Cary family, owners of All Things Barbecue, they returned to Kansas to help All Things Barbecue continue to excel in their cooking classes. Tom has been further developing and building cooking classes and private events at All Things Barbecue since March 2014.

Cheese.

Its production predates written history and it is not known where cheese was originally made, though the earliest evidence of cheese making can be found in modern day central Europe.

For this episode of Cooking With Fire, Josh Cary and Chef Tom Jackson were inspired by the 1985 Japanese film, Tampopo.

For this episode of Cooking With Fire, Josh Cary and Chef Tom Jackson were inspired by the 1996 film, Big Night.

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Early on in my marriage I started down the road of learning to really cook at home. It became a sort of challenge to myself to learn how to cook great dishes on a budget.

For this episode of Cooking With Fire, Josh Cary and Chef Tom Jackson were inspired by the 2014  film, Chef.

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When I was 19, I moved to Florida for college. I have a lot of fond memories of this time in my life, but if you get me talking about my college experience what you’re really going to get is the story of all of the different foods I was introduced to.

The first Lebanese immigrant came to the United States in 1854, with the first major wave bringing 100,000 of them between the late 1800s and 1920. Another wave between the years 1948 and 1985 brought another 60,000, and cities all over the U.S. are home to Lebanese communities both large and small.

When you think of great American inventors you likely think of men like Benjamin Franklin or Thomas Edison, and that is no surprise. These two men, and their inventions, gave a great deal to not just this country but the whole world.

But what if I told you there was someone who may be even more worthy of the title of Greatest American Inventor? That man was Oliver Evans.

Bread has been around for roughly 7,000 years, though early breads were very rough versions of what we eat today.

The 1904 World’s Fair in Saint Louis is the center of the modern culinary universe… that is, if you believe everything you read on the internet.

 

The classic roadside diner seems to be a staple of childhood memories and Hollywood films alike.

The history of the hamburger is a murky one…

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