Dan Margolies

Contributing Reporter

In a long and varied journalism career, Dan has worked as a business reporter for the Kansas City Business Journal, The Kansas City Star and Reuters. In a previous life, he was a lawyer. He has also worked as a media insurance underwriter and project development director for a small video production firm. 

Dan switched from print to radio in May 2014, when he became health editor of KCUR, the public radio station in Kansas City. In that role, he oversees a newly formed health reporting partnership among several news organizations focusing on Missouri and Kansas. 

Dan majored in philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis and holds law and journalism degrees from Boston University. He is a two-time finalist for the Gerald Loeb Awards for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism and the recipient of numerous first-place awards from the Missouri Press Association, Kansas City Press Club and the Association of Area Business Publications.

Contact info:

Work phone: (816) 235-5005

Mobile: (913) 568-5890

Email: margoliesd@kcur.org

Peter Taylor / flickr Creative Commons

A federal judge on Wednesday ordered an investigation into whether federal prosecutors have been using recordings of attorney-client meetings at Leavenworth prison illicitly.

In a blistering 48-page order, U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson wrote that there are “grave concerns about government intrusion into attorney-client communications.”

AP Photo

A federal judge has ordered Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach to turn over by Friday documents that he shared with then President-elect Donald Trump in a case challenging Kansas’ voter registration requirements.

A federal magistrate judge had previously directed Kobach to produce the documents, but Kobach sought review of the order. U.S. District Judge Julie Robinson on Wednesday denied Kobach’s request.

GUTTMACHER INSTITUTE

Along with Texas, Kansas leads the nation when it comes to imposing abortion restrictions not supported by scientific evidence, according to a report by a leading abortion rights organization.

Something for Missourians and Kansans to consider when they consider the effects of the measure approved by the House to repeal and replace major parts of the Affordable Care Act:

Both states are among the 11 with the highest levels of adults under age 65 with pre-existing medical conditions, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. 

Thirty percent of people living in both Kansas and Missouri have a pre-existing condition.

AP Photo

A federal judge has ordered Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach to produce two documents that he flashed during a visit with then President-elect Donald Trump in November. The order comes in a case challenging a state law requiring documentary proof of citizenship for voter registration.

Kobach had argued the documents were not relevant to the case, but U.S. Magistrate Judge James O’Hara disagreed and on Monday directed him to hand them over to the plaintiffs.

The law signed on Thursday by President Trump allowing states to cut off family planning funding to Planned Parenthood won’t have an immediate effect on the organization’s affiliates in Missouri and Kansas.

That’s because Kansas barred Planned Parenthood from receiving Title X family planning funds several years ago – a move later upheld by a federal appeals court.

Andy Marso / Kansas News Service/File photo

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach says he has secured his first conviction of a non-citizen for voting illegally.

In a news release issued Wednesday, Kobach says that Victor David Garcia Bebek, a native of Peru, pleaded guilty last week in Sedgwick County District Court to three misdemeanor charges of voting illegally.

Kobach says Bebek, before obtaining U.S. citizenship, cast votes in a 2012 special election, the 2012 general election and the 2014 general election. Desiree Taliaferro, a spokeswoman for Kobach, says Bebek was naturalized in February.

AP Photo

A federal magistrate says he wants to inspect documents that Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach shared with then President-elect Trump during the transition.

The order came in a case challenging the Kansas law requiring proof of citizenship for voter registration. The ACLU claims the requirement violates the federal motor voter act, which only requires voters to swear they are citizens. Kobach argues that has allowed non-citizens to register.

J. Stephen Conn / flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas Supreme Court will hear oral arguments Thursday morning on whether the state constitution protects a woman’s right to an abortion. Last year the Kansas Court of Appeals said it does.

The Kansas appeals court upheld a trial judge’s decision to block a Kansas law banning the second-trimester abortion procedure known as “dilation and evacuation.”

kslegislature.org

A Kansas senator who compared Planned Parenthood to Dachau doubled down on his statement and called Planned Parenthood worse than Nazi concentration camps.

Sen. Steve Fitzgerald, a Republican from Leavenworth, told KCUR in Kansas City on Monday that he saw nothing wrong with the comparison, which he made in a letter to Planned Parenthood after a woman made a donation to the organization in his name.

Asked if he thought Planned Parenthood was akin to a Nazi concentration camp, he replied, “Worse. Much worse, much worse, much worse."

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