Dan Margolies

Contributing Reporter

In a long and varied journalism career, Dan has worked as a business reporter for the Kansas City Business Journal, The Kansas City Star and Reuters. In a previous life, he was a lawyer. He has also worked as a media insurance underwriter and project development director for a small video production firm. 

Dan switched from print to radio in May 2014, when he became health editor of KCUR, the public radio station in Kansas City. In that role, he oversees a newly formed health reporting partnership among several news organizations focusing on Missouri and Kansas. 

Dan majored in philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis and holds law and journalism degrees from Boston University. He is a two-time finalist for the Gerald Loeb Awards for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism and the recipient of numerous first-place awards from the Missouri Press Association, Kansas City Press Club and the Association of Area Business Publications.

Contact info:

Work phone: (816) 235-5005

Mobile: (913) 568-5890

Email: margoliesd@kcur.org

(vhmh) / flickr Creative Commons

This story was updated at 2:45 p.m. to include the comments of the plaintiffs' attorney.

A Leawood, Kansas, couple whose home was raided by a police tactical team in a bungled SWAT-like search for marijuana will get their day in court after all.

The couple, both retired CIA agents, sued the Johnson County Board of Commissioners, Johnson County Sheriff Frank Denning and seven sheriff’s deputies over the botched 2012 raid, but a federal judge threw out the case in December 2015.

Dan Margolies / KCUR

KU Medical Center on Thursday officially opened its new health education building, an $82 million, 170,000-square-foot facility that will serve as the primary teaching venue for its medical, nursing and allied health profession schools.

The state-of-the-art building, at the northeast corner of Rainbow Boulevard and 39th Street, was funded with $26 million in state money, $21 million from the University of Kansas Medical Center, $25 million from the Hall Family Foundation and the rest in additional private money.

Bloomsberries, flickr Creative Commons

A lawsuit challenging Kansas’ civil commitment of sexually violent predators has been dismissed. The plaintiffs remain involuntarily confined at Larned State Hospital.

Since 1994, Kansas has required that people found to be sexually violent, and likely to reoffend, be involuntary confined in a state facility and undergo treatment.

The 20-plus patients who sued claimed high staff turnover and inadequate access to treatment made it extremely difficult to complete the program, and had left them in indefinite confinement in prison-like conditions.

A federal judge has dismissed the lawsuit of a former Haskell Indian Nations University student who says she was raped by two of the school’s football players. She sought damages from the school, the federal government, the Secretary of the Department of the Interior and Haskell employees.

The 21-page order by U.S. District Judge J. Thomas Marten ruled that the government and university were immune from damages under the doctrine of sovereign immunity and that the ex-student had other remedies against the employees.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

A federal magistrate judge on Wednesday refused to reconsider his order fining Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach $1,000 for misleading the court.

U.S. Magistrate Judge James P. O’Hara said the reconsideration request raised arguments that Kobach should have made earlier.

O’Hara last month fined Kobach after finding that he had deceived the court about the nature of documents he was photographed taking into a November meeting with then President-elect Donald Trump.

UNITED STATES MISSION GENEVA / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

In a post Tuesday on the Health Affairs blog, former Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius calls the Republican health care plans passed by the House and proposed by the Senate “a very cruel war on the poor.”

The post, co-authored with Ron Pollack, founding executive director of consumer health group Families USA, states, “By far, no demographic group would be hurt more by these legislative proposals than low-income people. They are the bulls-eye!”

REDBULL TRINKER / FLICKR — CC

Two former detainees at the Leavenworth Detention Center have filed a class action lawsuit over the taping of meetings and calls between inmates and their attorneys at the pretrial facility.

The lawsuit follows a similar one filed by two attorneys who alleged their phone calls and meetings with clients at the facility were taped.

Kaiser Family Foundation

Just 31 percent of Kansans and 32 percent of Missourians support the House-approved bill to repeal Obamacare, according to new estimates published Wednesday in The New York Times.

In fact, not one state has a majority of residents who are for the measure, with support ranging from a low of 22 percent in Massachusetts (Washington, D.C., is even lower at 16 percent) to a high of 38 percent in Oklahoma, according to the estimates.

ANNIE E. CASEY FOUNDATION

Kansas scores 15th among the 50 states for overall child well-being, according to the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s 2017 “Kids Count” report.

The state’s relatively high overall ranking is driven by its No. 7 ranking for kids’ economic well-being, based on indicators like housing affordability and employment security for parents.

But the state fares less well in three other categories: health, in which the foundation ranks it 20th; education, 26th; and family and community, 23rd.

healthcare.gov

Three weeks after Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas City said it will pull out of the Affordable Care Act exchange in 2018, Centene Corp. says it plans to offer coverage through the exchange in Missouri and Kansas.

The St. Louis-based insurer already has a presence in both states administering Medicaid plans, but the move to sell individual and small group health plans is new.

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