Dan Margolies

Contributing Reporter

In a long and varied journalism career, Dan has worked as a business reporter for the Kansas City Business Journal, The Kansas City Star and Reuters. In a previous life, he was a lawyer. He has also worked as a media insurance underwriter and project development director for a small video production firm. 

Dan switched from print to radio in May 2014, when he became health editor of KCUR, the public radio station in Kansas City. In that role, he oversees a newly formed health reporting partnership among several news organizations focusing on Missouri and Kansas. 

Dan majored in philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis and holds law and journalism degrees from Boston University. He is a two-time finalist for the Gerald Loeb Awards for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism and the recipient of numerous first-place awards from the Missouri Press Association, Kansas City Press Club and the Association of Area Business Publications.

Contact info:

Work phone: (816) 235-5005

Mobile: (913) 568-5890

Email: margoliesd@kcur.org

J. Stephen Conn / flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas Supreme Court will hear oral arguments Thursday morning on whether the state constitution protects a woman’s right to an abortion. Last year the Kansas Court of Appeals said it does.

The Kansas appeals court upheld a trial judge’s decision to block a Kansas law banning the second-trimester abortion procedure known as “dilation and evacuation.”

kslegislature.org

A Kansas senator who compared Planned Parenthood to Dachau doubled down on his statement and called Planned Parenthood worse than Nazi concentration camps.

Sen. Steve Fitzgerald, a Republican from Leavenworth, told KCUR in Kansas City on Monday that he saw nothing wrong with the comparison, which he made in a letter to Planned Parenthood after a woman made a donation to the organization in his name.

Asked if he thought Planned Parenthood was akin to a Nazi concentration camp, he replied, “Worse. Much worse, much worse, much worse."

Charles Riedel / AP

Updated at 12:46 p.m.

As expected, the Kansas Supreme Court this morning ruled that Kansas’ school funding formula is inadequate under the Kansas Constitution.

In an 83-page decision, the court gave the Legislature until June 30 to address the state’s public education financing system.

Johnson County Sheriff's Office

The suspect accused of shooting and killing a man in an Olathe, Kansas, bar last week and wounding two others made his initial appearance in Johnson County District Court Monday via closed-circuit television.

Judge Timothy McCarthy appointed a public defender to represent Adam Purinton, 51, of Olathe, who is charged with one count of first-degree murder and two counts of attempted first-degree murder.

During his brief appearance, Purinton stared straight ahead as McCarthy asked him his name, whether he had a copy of the criminal complaint and whether he had counsel.

The Affordable Care Act has been credited – and blamed – for lots of things, but lowering the divorce rate generally hasn’t been one of them.

Not until now, anyway. A paper co-authored by two KU economists suggests that states that expanded Medicaid saw fewer so-called medical divorces than states, like Kansas and Missouri, that didn’t expand Medicaid.

How so?

Used to be Medicaid had an asset limit. The program’s income eligibility requirements limited the maximum amount of assets and income individuals could possess.

KCUR

A torrent of civil lawsuits over alleged sexual abuse by a former employee of the Department of Veterans Affairs hospital in Leavenworth is expected now that a federal judge has refused to dismiss one of the cases.

Three more lawsuits were filed this week in federal court, bringing the total to 15 so far, and dozens more are expected to be filed in coming months.

The suits by military veterans accuse Mark E. Wisner, a one-time physician’s assistant at the hospital who held himself out as a doctor, of sexually molesting them during physical exams.

KCUR

A Kansas court has ruled that doctors who mistakenly diagnose a case of child abuse are not liable for malpractice under Kansas law.

The Kansas Court of Appeals said the Kansas law requiring doctors to report suspected cases of child abuse protects them from civil liability.

The case arose when the parents of a nine-month-old girl brought her to KU Hospital for a respiratory infection. After examining the baby, the doctor suspected sexual abuse and alerted the police.

MICHAEL COGHLAN / CREATIVE COMMONS-FLICKR

The Kansas Federal Public Defender says federal prosecutors have failed to turn over all attorney-client phone calls that were recorded at the pretrial detention center in Leavenworth to a special master looking into their legality.

In a court filing Wednesday, the public defender identified recorded calls to at least two attorneys that were not disclosed by prosecutors.

haysmed.com

Extending its growing reach in Kansas, the University of Kansas Hospital has finalized its agreement to partner with Hays Medical Center in the northwest part of the state.

In September, the two institutions signed a letter of intent to join forces, with HaysMed maintaining its name and separate ownership structure.

Dan Margolies / Heartland Health Monitor

Dementia is an impairment of brain functions marked by memory loss and personality changes. It affects an estimated 4 to 5 million adults in the United States annually and, as the elder population increases, is likely to have a growing impact in the future.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting as many as 5 million Americans in 2013, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That number is projected to rise to 14 million by 2050.

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