Dan Margolies

HEALTH EDITOR/REPORTER

Dan Margolies is editor in charge of health news at KCUR, the public radio station in Kansas City.  Dan joined KCUR in April 2014. In a long and varied journalism career, he has worked as a reporter for the Kansas City Business Journal, The Kansas City Star and Reuters. In a previous life, he was a lawyer. He has also worked as a media insurance underwriter and project development director for a video production firm.

Dan was born in Brooklyn, NY, and moved to Kansas City with his family when he was eight years old. He majored in philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis and holds law and journalism degrees from Boston University.

He is a two-time finalist for the Gerald Loeb Awards for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism and the recipient of numerous first-place awards from the Missouri Press Association, Kansas City Press Club and the Association of Area Business Publications.

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Dan Margolies / KCUR

Shawnee Mission Health has become the 17th member nationwide of the MD Anderson Cancer Network, joining forces with one of the top cancer centers in the United States.

The affiliation follows a year-long certification process by MD Anderson and is a big leap forward for Shawnee Mission Health’s cancer center, which opened not quite four years ago.

WWW.FRANCHISEOPPORTUNITIES.COM / flickr Creative Commons

The American Civil Liberties Union wants to know why a student athlete at Garden City Community College was kicked off the basketball team after he continued shooting baskets during the playing of the national anthem.

Rasool Samir, a Muslim, was sent home to Philadelphia two days later and has not returned to the school since.

Newly unsealed testimony given by Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach suggests he knew that the federal motor voter law might have to be amended for states to require proof of citizenship for voter registration.

In a sworn deposition in a lawsuit challenging Kansas’ proof-of-citizenship requirement, Kobach acknowledged drafting proposed amendments to the National Voter Registration Act, the formal name of the motor voter law, after courts blocked the requirement for Kansas voters registering at DMV offices.

Peter Taylor / flickr Creative Commons

The Federal Public Defender’s office is asking a judge to hold the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Kansas in contempt after it stopped cooperating with an investigation of attorney-client tapings at a Leavenworth prison.

The U.S. Attorney’s decision was disclosed earlier this week in a report by the special master, Cleveland attorney David R. Cohen, who was appointed by the judge to look into the tapings.

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A company that challenged the no-bid contract awarded to Cerner Corp. to update the electronic health records system of the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs is appealing the dismissal of its lawsuit.

CliniComp International Inc. of San Diego on Monday filed a notice of appeal after the U.S. Court of Federal Claims in Washington, D.C., last week threw out its lawsuit on jurisdictional grounds.

Because many of the documents in the case are sealed, including the court’s orders, the precise reasons for the case’s dismissal were not made public.

Dan Margolies / KCUR

Emily Dumler, a Shawnee, Kansas, resident who was diagnosed with an extremely aggressive form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, successfully underwent immunotherapy more than two years ago.

Dumler was among the first people in the world to receive the treatment, which stimulates the immune system to fight cancer. But she had to travel to MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas, to receive it.

Today, the 36-year-old mother of three is cancer-free. And now, local patients with the same cancer diagnosis won't have to travel as far as Dumler did for treatment.

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The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Kansas has stopped cooperating with an investigation into the taping of attorney-client meetings and phone calls at the pretrial detention facility in Leavenworth, according to the special master looking into the matter.

The decision by the office is likely to heighten suspicions by criminal defense lawyers that the U.S. Attorney’s Office is concealing information about the tapings from them.

Kansas News Service/File photo

The federal agency that oversees Medicaid has agreed to a one-year extension of Kansas’ $3.2 billion KanCare program, which provides managed care services to the state’s Medicaid population.

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Another shareholder lawsuit is challenging the proposed merger of the parent company of Kansas City Power & Light Co. and Westar Energy Inc. in Topeka.

The $14 billion cash and stock deal, a so-called merger of equals, was announced in July. The merged company, to be called Monarch Energy Holding, would have about 1.6 million customers in Missouri and Kansas.

Regulators rejected an earlier proposed deal because they said the price was too high and required KCP&L’s parent to take on too much debt.

University of Kansas Hospital

A University of Kansas scientist who won a prestigious award last year for her work on antibiotic resistance has chalked up another major achievement.

The National Institutes of Health announced Thursday morning that it’s awarding nearly $2.3 million to Joanna Slusky and her lab to further their work on combating the problem of antibiotic-resistant infections.

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