Deborah Shaar

News Reporter

Reporter Deborah Shaar joined the news team at KMUW in September 2014. She spent more than a dozen years working in news at both public and commercial radio and television stations in Ohio, West Virginia and Detroit, Michigan. Before relocating to Wichita, Deborah taught news and broadcasting classes at Tarrant County College in the Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas area.

Deborah’s reporting has been featured on NPR newscasts and Morning Edition. In 2016, she earned a regional RTDNA Edward R. Murrow award for investigative reporting (Searching for Zebra Mussels in Wellington Lake). The Kansas Association of Broadcasters recognized her reporting with two awards in 2016 (Hesston: Sounds of Resilience and FAA Airport Weather Observer Series) and one award in 2015 (Hesston’s Recovery 25 Years after an F-5 Tornado Hit).

She began her on-air career as a news reporter and anchor at several small market TV stations in southeast Ohio and West Virginia. She fine-tuned her writing and producing skills while working on a highly rated three-hour morning news show at the Fox TV affiliate in Detroit, Michigan. From there, she put her on-air, writing and producing skills to good use: training and developing broadcast news students at Ohio University. As managing editor of the WOUB radio and television newsroom, Deborah served in a crucial role as supervisor of the student-staffed nightly television newscast. Many of her student anchors, reporters and producers earned prestigious national, state and regional awards—and still work in the news business today. She continued her on-air work as a fill-in anchor for a statewide TV news network in Ohio.

Deborah earned Bachelor and Master of Science degrees in journalism from Ohio University. Her master’s thesis is a historical narrative about the transformation of journalism training at the University of Leipzig, Germany as a result of Germany’s reunification.

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U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran of Kansas is working to help preserve the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

The Republican senator wants the Trump administration to revamp the agreement, not end it.

Sen. Moran and two other Republican senators sent a letter in support of NAFTA to new U.S Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, who was confirmed by the Senate Thursday.

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The United Methodist Open Door food pantry is getting ready for an expected uptick in demand that comes when the school year ends.

The pantry recently moved to a larger distribution center that’s more accessible.

The United Methodist Open Door Community Food Ministry raised $2.75 million to renovate a former Cessna training facility on East 21st Street in Wichita. Planning for the new pantry began about two years ago.

A non-partisan research and policy group says most of the undergraduate programs in Kansas that prepare high school teachers received a D or F grade in the latest ratings. Newman University in Wichita is one of two Kansas schools that scored in the top 25 percent.

The National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) rated Benedictine College in the 83rd percentile and Newman University in the 76th percentile for their secondary education programs.

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Sedgwick County is moving forward with the remaining renovation work on its Ronald Reagan Building in downtown Wichita.

County commissioners voted unanimously on Wednesday to approve a $1.3 million contract with Key Construction.

Work on the fourth through sixth floors of the building at 271 W. 3rd St. will begin in June and take about five months.

Sedgwick County spokeswoman Kate Flavin says when four county departments move in, the building will be fully occupied.

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The third and final round of public meetings for the 95th Street corridor project in southern Sedgwick County will take place in the next few days.

One meeting will be held on Thursday in Derby, while another one will happen on Tuesday in Haysville.

The county launched a long-range transportation study on improvements to 95th Street South that could possibly include adding a bridge over the Arkansas River.

Commissioner Jim Howell says the road improvements could support future growth needs.

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Sedgwick County is increasing its transportation services for older adults and people with disabilities who live in cities outside of Wichita city limits.

County commissioners voted on Wednesday to seek a $97,000 grant from the Wichita Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (WAMPO) for the Sedgwick County Transportation (SCT) program.

The money will be used to add a driver and an accessible vehicle to SCT.

Andover Public Schools

The Andover Public School District will be moving forward with building new schools, renovations and security upgrades beginning this summer.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

The City of Wichita is exploring the possibility of creating a public-private partnership to pay for the next phase of its Century II Performing Arts and Convention Center.

At 48 years old, the downtown circular building with the light blue roof is showing its age, and the convention business has changed. Also, the city-owned public library next door will be vacant in a few years.

City Manager Robert Layton said Tuesday that the city is considering a number of options for remodeling Century II or building new facilities based on results from a 2014 market study.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Wichita State University is in the process of changing its student fee structure to be more equitable.

Student fees pay for athletics and student services, and are currently calculated per credit hour. WSU wants to begin a flat-fee system where students pay fees based on the number of credit hours they take.

There would be three levels of student fees; all students in each level would pay the same amount.

WSU says the change will only impact student fees. Course fees, certain program fees and infrastructure fees will remain a per credit hour fee.

Andover Public Schools

Voters in the Andover Public School District will have an opportunity to decide two bond proposals on Tuesday.

The first proposition includes nine projects at a cost of about $169 million.

If approved, two new schools would be built, storm shelters would be added to six schools and all school entrances would get security upgrades.

Superintendent Greg Rasmussen says taxpayers won’t see an increase in the tax rate, but would pay an additional 17 years of taxes if this bond issue is approved.

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