Fletcher Powell

Production Manager and All Things Considered Host

If Fletcher Powell could be someone else, he’d be Errol Morris or Ira Glass. Except younger and better looking.

Since he can’t, he’ll be Fletcher Powell, KMUW Production Manager and host of All Things Considered. Fletcher came to KMUW in 2009 after five years of working in the stock market (don’t ask). He feels like this line of work fits him a little better than that one did.

Fletcher has a BA in Psychology from the University of Kansas and an MA in Communication from Wichita State University. He’s lived in Wichita most of his life, aside from some brief stops in Iowa and Ohio. He likes baseball, guinea pigs, and the Oxford comma.

Ways to Connect

Boots Riley, the director of Sorry To Bother You, has explicitly asked us all not to give anything away about what happens in the film to anyone who hasn’t seen it yet. I think, ideally, most filmmakers would like this to be the case, but with Sorry To Bother You, I will respect Riley’s wishes.

In 2004, a man and his 12-year-old daughter were discovered living in a vast park in Portland, Oregon. They’d apparently been living there for four years, in a makeshift shelter with a garden, the man teaching his daughter from old encyclopedias. The two were relocated to a house on a horse farm, disappeared five days later, and were never seen again.

The writer Peter Rock took this story and imagined what might have happened to the two, and the book he wrote has been turned into the new movie Leave No Trace.

OK, Marvel fans, I’ve got a BIG spoiler coming up.

Are you ready?

All right: I know how the Avengers are going to repair all of the destruction wrought by Thanos in Infinity War. Now, stay with me… they’re going to say the word “quantum” a lot, and then… they’re going to do whatever they want to do.

You know what you don’t see much of these days? PG-rated movies. I looked it up: Only 16 percent of movies last year were rated PG. This isn’t actually anything new, it’s been going on for a while, but it’s for a reason—the perception is that PG movies don’t sell. PG-13 is where the big money is. In reality, PG does just fine financially, but that doesn’t matter—studio execs want PG-13, so that’s what they get.

The new comedy Uncle Drew is a prime example of this. It’s pretty much a PG movie that I guess does just enough to get a PG-13 rating.

We do not live in a kind world. You don’t need me to illustrate this point.

It’s difficult for me to know how to talk about Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, the new documentary on Mr. Rogers, because what I’m tempted to do is to recount all of the lessons he taught us throughout the years. That we’re all unique people who are worthy of love. That it’s OK to be scared sometimes, or to be angry sometimes, or not to know what to feel sometimes. But what can I say that Mr. Rogers hasn’t already said better?

If you see just one superhero movie this year… see Black Panther. BUT: if you see two superhero movies this year—wait, you’ve probably already seen Infinity War also, haven’t you…

It’s interesting what a movie can do to you. Last weekend, I saw the new horror film Hereditary. And when the lights came up, I felt just slightly underwhelmed. Like maybe I was missing something.

What do we do when one version of us dies? When we can no longer be the person we used to be? Where do we find meaning when our purpose has been taken from us?

First of all, it seems weird that people are worried that Solo: A Star Wars Story brought in only $103 million in its first four days of release -- $103 million is a lot of money!

“Ah, but Fletcher,” you say, “it’s not Star Wars money.” And that’s true. It’s not.

hbo.com

It used to be that we didn’t expect that much from our TV movies. For a long time, there was a good reason a movie would head to television instead of the theater. 

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