Stephen Koranda

Contributing Reporter

Stephen Koranda reports on the Kansas Legislature, state government and everything else for Kansas Public Radio. He previously worked in Mississippi and Iowa, where he covered stories ranging from hurricanes to state executions. 

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Updated Thursday, 8:50 p.m.

The Kansas Senate and House have voted to allow public health care facilities to continue banning concealed weapons. The 24-16 Senate vote and 91-33 House vote send the plan to Gov. Sam Brownback for consideration.

State law requires most public places to allow concealed firearms by this summer or install security at entrances to keep weapons out. Health care facilities have an exemption that ends later this year.

Stephen Koranda

Kansas Senators have approved a plan for funding K-12 schools. The 23-14 vote sends the bill to the House for consideration.

The proposal would increase spending by around $230 million over two years, after the state Supreme Court ruled in March that Kansas schools are inadequately funded.

Republican Senate Majority Leader Jim Denning helped draft the plan and believes it will satisfy the justices.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

During a late night vote, Kansas Senators approved a bill that would have rolled back many of the state’s 2012 tax cuts. However, House members then promptly shot down the bill.

Stephen Koranda

The Kansas Senate has approved and sent to the governor a bill that requires clinics to expand the information provided to a woman seeking an abortion. The bill also specifies that the information must be printed in black 12-point, Times New Roman font.

The bill would add additional details to disclosure forms, including information about a physician’s credentials, insurance and any disciplinary actions taken against them. Supporters of the proposal, including Republican Sen. Mary Pilcher-Cook, said the changes will better inform women seeking an abortion.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File Photo

Lawmakers return to the Kansas Statehouse Tuesday with the hopes of quickly wrapping up a legislative session that’s already into overtime. Leaders want to end the session this week, but they have significant issues to tackle such as balancing the budget.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas lawmakers have left for the weekend, but not before going into overtime. When they come back on Tuesday, they’ll be on Day 102 of what was supposed to be a 100-day legislative session.

Stephen Koranda

The Kansas Board of Regents has selected Dr. Doug Girod to be the next chancellor of the University of Kansas. Girod has been serving as the head of the KU Medical Center for the last four years.

The regents held a special meeting in Lawrence Thursday to make the announcement.

“Dr. Girod is the right person for this time of transition. His 23 years of service are a testament to Dr. Girod’s love and commitment to KU," said Regents Chair Zoe Newton. "He will honor KU’s traditions and history while leading this great university into the future."

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

House lawmakers have passed a new spending plan for Kansas schools, on a vote of 84-39. The bill now heads to the Senate for consideration.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

The Kansas House debated a new school finance plan for five hours Wednesday, taking up two dozen amendments and finally voting 81-40 to advance a bill not much different from the one that had come out of committee. The measure is slated to get a final vote in the House Thursday. Then it will be the Senate’s turn.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Members of the Kansas House are debating a new plan to fund the state’s schools. The bill would add $280 million more in school funding over two years. House members rejected a Democratic proposal that would have added $600 million for schools over three years. Supporters said adding more money could help satisfy the state Supreme Court's order to adequately fund education. Critics of the idea said it would require a huge tax increase or spending cuts to other services. Republican Majority Leader Don Hineman opposed the plan.

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