Art Review

Artist Curt Clonts takes listeners on an artistic journey through the eyes of an insider. Tune in on alternate Wednesday to hear his latest art review.

My wife, Taeko, and I include photography in our small art collection at home. I believe photography is often under-appreciated in fine arts circles in America. Thankfully, we have a photographer-artist in Wichita who devotes her life to the fine art of photography. She's Linda K. Robinson, owner of the Midwest Center for Photography, on Franklin Street in Riverside.


The Coded Couture exhibit at The Ulrich Museum is stunning and powerful. I arrived to view art. I also found a social investigation as to where we are heading as a people and how we communicate.

Curt Clonts

I received my monthly art publications in the mail this week and I found myself first rifling through them, looking at images, and identifying all the crap.  Maybe I'm just grouchy this week, but I'm sick and bored of "art-as-trend." 

Curt Clonts

Dear Sam,

Like you, I am a proud Kansan. I have been married for 36 years and have three children with college degrees and children of their own. I vote. I served as a U.S. Marine for 8 years. Like you, I am a Catholic. And, though I do not fit the stereotype, I am an artist.

When I lived away from Wichita and I would come home to visit, I would always take some time and drive Douglas Avenue from Oliver to the river. My beloved Douglas is the artery with the real pulse in Wichita.

More than 100,000 Iraqi refugees have resettled in the United States in the past decade.

They live quiet lives and seek peace. Their stories and experiences, most often horrifying, are never heard.

Chuck Dooms

Chuck Dooms and his cell phone camera are to photography what the 4-track recorder is to rock-and-roll. 

But, a low-budget approach in the hands of an artist can often equal a completely original, howling, needed, primal approach to art making.

David Lee Quick is a painter, film maker, photographer, and writer.

  He has been around. All around.

Mr. Quick, who is a native of Wichita, began an artist's journey in the early 70's that took him to 38 states.


In this week's ​An Artist's Perspective, KMUW Art Reviewer Curt Clonts reviews the work of artist/illustrator Kylie Millward, and also interviews her in the KMUW studio. Here's both:


Not long ago I viewed a small exhibition by Wichita artist/illustrator Kylie Millward and I was completely taken in. 

The fresh, illustrative work was obviously perfect for children's books, but I was thrown off by the deliciously twisted nature of some of the pieces.

Larry Schwarm


I moved back to Wichita and started making my art here in 1991. I was very lucky to find and surround myself with many artists who were searching and fighting to make a mark with their work like I was. We pushed ourselves and fought to get our names out there in every possible way. The energy was rock and roll, the art scene became electric and new collectors began to buy. This energy phoneme became the '90's art explosion which helped propel Wichita in to the art city it is today.