Commentary

It turns out none of us is quite as forward-thinking as we’d like to imagine we are. That’s one of the major takeaways from Get Out, the incisive new thriller from Jordan Peele of TV’s sketch comedy duo Key & Peele. And the movie itself is funny, though it’s certainly not a comedy. It’s first and foremost a real horror movie, one with serious racial tones, and one that pulls no punches.

Surely by now you have purchased and are flying your Wichita flag! You feel the current and see how we, the Wichita people, are on fire and looking out for our city's growth and welfare. I hope you share these facts with your out-of-town friends as well.

Cory Norton

  

Last time I talked about musical geography - how style springs up from places that artists and audiences can identify with. I gave lots of examples from all over the country, but the most important aspect of this is that there is a musical nexus right here.

I’m constantly surprised by what I hear in hip hop, and not just lyrically. The other half of hip hop, the beats, is as expansive and comprehensive a music as any other, and because it’s sample-based music, it’s really hard to run out of new forms.

Often, when the subject of musical theatre comes up, someone will point out the unnatural audacity of people bursting into song in order to express how they feel about someone or something. Of course, as every musician will tell you, music is built expressly for just this task, even if it is created according to strict intellectual form and/or function. In the musical Once, the plot revolves around a songwriter and his work, so the songs we hear seem more organic to the unfolding of the story. 

Depending on where you were born, or perhaps where you currently live, your experience with pastrami is likely to be a mixed one.

Nintendo has been the leader in portable video gaming ever since they basically invented the market segment with the Game Boy in 1989. That doesn’t mean they’ve been the only player, though. 

Give The Great Wall credit for at least one thing: It gets straight to the point. 

The Kansas House and Senate advanced tax bills this past week that endanger Governor Brownback’s signature tax plan.  

The House passed the measure last Thursday with a 76-48 vote. 

Senator Ty Masterson of Andover dubbed the House measure “a piece of garbage.”

The Senate passed the measure the next day 22-18--just one vote above the minimum required for passage.

Richard Crowson

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