disabilities

Jim McLean / Kansas News Service

This post was updated Wednesday at 10:54 a.m. to reflect Sen. Moran's statement on the Senate health care bill. 

Disability rights advocates are among the strongest opponents of the Obamacare replacement legislation that Republicans are attempting to push through Congress.

If anything resembling the bill that the U.S. House approved in May or the one the Senate now is considering passes, they say it will roll back decades of progress.

Susan NYC / flickr

Sedgwick County is increasing its transportation services for older adults and people with disabilities who live in cities outside of Wichita city limits.

County commissioners voted on Wednesday to seek a $97,000 grant from the Wichita Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (WAMPO) for the Sedgwick County Transportation (SCT) program.

The money will be used to add a driver and an accessible vehicle to SCT.

SDOT Photos / flickr Creative Commons

The Wichita Police Department is asking for the public’s help to monitor handicap accessible parking spots throughout the city.

The department is recruiting 40 volunteers—10 for each bureau—for its Accessible Parking Program. Volunteers will let police know when they see someone park illegally in spots reserved for people with disabilities, or in areas that block access zones. A sergeant could issue a ticket, which carries a fine of up to $100.

WPD Lt. James Espinoza said Tuesday that volunteers are performing an important civic duty.

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There continues to be an improvement in the area of using inclusive language when referring to people with disabilities. It's something that experts want to build on.

Shawn Walters is the service manager for the Independent Living Resource Center in Wichita, which helps people with various disabilities: mental, physical or developmental. He says it's important to learn what language a person prefers when describing their disability.

Stock photo / http://www.sxc.hu/profile/jvangalen

The Independent Living Resource Center in Wichita is hosting a celebration Wednesday recognizing the 25th Anniversary of the American Disabilities Act.

The federal legislation, signed by President George H.W. Bush in July of 1990, extends civil rights protections to individuals with physical or mental disabilities including in the areas of employment and public accommodations.

http://www.thestrengthcoach.com

Sunday marks the 25th anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act. The law has increased access to public buildings and worked to end workplace discrimination, but for some people, a stigma still exists. One man is hoping a simple Major League Baseball game will help.

Greg Smith is a person. He’s not a disability. And that simple idea is what he believes many people still have trouble understanding. He’s had muscular dystrophy his whole life, and lives in Mississippi.

The Secretary of the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services says new federal labor rules may interfere with services that help disabled Kansans live in their own homes.

As Bryan Thompson explains, the concern is about overtime for workers who are hired and supervised by people with disabilities. 

KDADS Secretary Kari Bruffett told a legislative panel a new rule scheduled to go into effect January first will change the way overtime is calculated for these workers.

A federal board that studies disability issues has been meeting in Topeka.

The National Council on Disability advises Congress and the president on matters affecting Americans with disabilities.

Gary Blumenthal is a member of the council and a former Kansas legislator. He says the group chose to meet in Kansas because of policies affecting people with disabilities, like the state's overhauled Medicaid program now managed by private companies.

Is Kansas Short-Changing The Disabled?

Oct 29, 2013

A Kansas advocacy group says the state has failed to comply with targets for delivering services to developmentally disabled people for years.

The Disability Rights Center says 3,300 developmentally disabled Kansans who qualify for Medicaid services continue to be denied aid.

The DRC says number of vacancies has grown each of the past four years.

And these vacancies have contributed to people having to wait up to five years to start receiving home- and community-based aid.

Kan. Plans Events On Medicaid Changes For Disabled

Sep 17, 2013

Kansas officials have scheduled four meetings next week to discuss how people with disabilities will be affected when they're included in an overhaul of the state's Medicaid program.

The Department for Aging and Disability Services says the meetings are intended for physically and developmentally disabled Kansans, their families and groups that provided services. The sessions will give those parties a chance to ask questions about the overhaul.

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