The federal government says rates will increase by more than 16 percent for Kansas residents who buy middle-of-the-road "silver" health coverage plans through its online marketplace.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released a report Monday showing that the increase in Kansas is higher than the average for 38 states in which consumers rely on the federal exchange. The average change in those states is a 7.5 percent increase.

Silver plans pay 70 percent of costs on average.

Jeff Kubina, flickr Creative Commons

Some states are scrambling to make sure that citizens can still get federal subsidies for buying health insurance, no matter how the Supreme Court rules in a pending case. But as the Heartland Health Monitor’s Bryan Thompson reports, Kansas has no back-up plan.

The Supreme Court is weighing whether a flaw in the wording of the Affordable Care Act means subsidies are not legal in the 34 states that rely on the federal health insurance exchange known as the marketplace.

A legislative oversight committee is meeting on Monday to hear a status report on changes made to the state's Medicaid program.

The state contracted with three private managed-care organizations earlier this year; they administer Medicaid programs for the poor, elderly, and disabled.

The Joint Committee on Home and Community Based Services and KanCare Oversight will hear from groups that represent developmentally disabled and community-based service providers.

Aileen LeBlanc / KMUW

Winner of a 2014 Edward R. Murrow Award for Investigative Reporting. 

System Breakdown

There is a crisis in healthcare in this country and it’s not directly involved with the Affordable Care Act. There is a larger problem. With the population numbers as they stand right now, there are just not enough physicians to take care of them.

A new report by the Center for Rural Affairs finds that rural residents stand to benefit from the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, more than their city-dwelling counterparts.

The author of the report, Jon Bailey, says the premium tax credits to help pay for individual health insurance plans, and the caps on out-of-pocket costs will be especially important to people who live in rural areas.