income tax

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

Groups representing Kansas teachers, state workers, contractors and others are proposing a tax overhaul they say would solve the state’s budget problems. The plan would undo some tax cuts made in recent years by raising the top income tax rate. It would also reinstate income taxes on hundreds of thousands of businesses.

Former Kansas Budget Director Duane Goossen and others revealed the tax plan Wednesday in Topeka. He says the tax cuts have hurt the state’s ability to invest in needed services and the proposal would reverse that.

401(K) 2012, flickr Creative Commons

Sixty-one percent of Kansans surveyed by Fort Hays State University want the new Legislature to close the LLC tax exemption.

Exempting 330,000 small businesses and farmers from state income tax has been the centerpiece of Gov. Sam Brownback’s economic plan.

But Rep. Russ Jennings, a Republican from Lakin, who says he’ll be running for speaker when lawmakers convene in January, says he’s for putting those businesses back on the tax rolls.

Stephen Koranda, File Photo / KPR

Gov. Sam Brownback has vetoed a bill that included provisions prompted by a multi-million dollar tax dispute with pizza magnate Gene Bicknell.

The Lawrence Journal-World reports that the bill that Gov. Sam Brownback vetoed on Tuesday was designed to help taxpayers challenge rulings of the Board of Tax Appeals. Under the ruling, taxpayers would be allowed to appeal decisions from the governor-appointed board to district court, where they could present new evidence.

KCUR

Among the nearly 334,000 Kansas businesses that owe no state income taxes thanks to the Brownback administration’s 2012 tax cuts is one called BCLT II, LLC.

BCLT II happens to be owned by Bill Self, the legendary University of Kansas men’s basketball head coach.

Under his 2012 contract with KU, Self pulls down a salary of $230,000 a year. But that’s just a small part of his compensation.

Stephen Koranda, File Photo / Kansas Public Radio

Three Republican Kansas senators say the state should overhaul a policy that lets thousands of business owners avoid paying income taxes. Under current law, owners of more than 300,000 businesses don’t have to pay any state income taxes.

Senate Vice President Jeff King says that was not their intention when lawmakers passed the tax cut. He says they only meant to exempt working capital from income taxes, not the wages a business owner takes home.

Stephen Koranda file photo

The Kansas secretary of revenue says Republican Governor Sam Brownback will veto any attempts to roll back business income tax cuts. Secretary Nick Jordan told a group of senators yesterday that Brownback was opposed to any broad changes to business tax rules.

More than 300,000 business owners pay zero state income tax because of the 2012 tax cut, and some lawmakers want to look at amending that to help close a budget gap.

Senate Republican Majority Leader Terry Bruce believes the governor has shut the door on that issue for now.

State Tax Revenues Miss Expectations In October

Oct 31, 2013

The Kansas Department of Revenue says the state collected nearly $18 million less in taxes than anticipated in October.

Legislation that cuts Kansas income taxes over the next five years is now law.

Gov.  Brownback signed House Bill 2059 this morning during a signing ceremony at a construction site in Overland Park.  Brownback followed that event up with a signing ceremony this afternoon at the McGinty Machine Company in downtown Wichita.

Read a summary of the bill here.

May 15, 2013
Stephen Koranda / KPR

After making little progress for weeks, public negotiations on taxes have continued in the Kansas Statehouse.

Legislative leaders and the governor had been meeting behind closed doors, but this week it appeared those talks had stalled.

House and Senate negotiators held a public meeting Wednesday and House members offered a new compromise.

The House and Senate have been divided on the issue of sales taxes.

Kansas lawmakers just returned to the Statehouse on Wednesday, but already it looks like a disagreement on taxes could push the session past lawmakers' 80-day deadline.

House and Senate Republicans disagree on whether to extend a temporary sales tax increase. It's set to expire on July 1, and House leaders want to let it end as planned. Republican leaders in both chambers want to lower income tax rates, and Senators say keeping the sales tax elevated allows the state to lower income tax rates more quickly.

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