Kansas Department of Agriculture

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Kansas agriculture experts are holding workshops this month to help agriculture producers and vendors get ready for the upcoming farmers’ market season. 

One of the workshops is tomorrow at the Sedgwick County Extension Office in west Wichita.

Vendors can brush up on sales tax laws and regulations on selling meat, poultry and eggs. Janelle Dobbins with the Kansas Department of Agriculture says other topics include beekeeping, growing in high tunnels and vendor marketing.

Kansas Department of Agriculture/Twitter

Kansas-made agricultural products and food items were on display at the Kansas Statehouse in Topeka Tuesday to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the state's agricultural trademark program, From the Land of Kansas.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service/File Photo

After pushing for changes to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), President Donald Trump earlier this year kicked off negotiations among the U.S., Canada and Mexico.

Any major changes to the agreement could have a big impact on Kansas.

Kansas Republican Sen. Pat Roberts and Sen. Jerry Moran have said they’re open to updates but emphasize that the agreement needs to preserve or expand export opportunities.

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Updated Wednesday at 10:34 p.m.

Tyson Foods is considering Sedgwick County and two other locations in Kansas as possible sites for a new $320 million poultry processing complex.

Bryan Thompson / Kansas News Service

Darrel Urban stands in front of a newly-dug pit the size of two football fields laid end-to-end, and ten feet deep. Soon, it will be full of hog waste, and two more large pits will join it.

A site two miles outside of the tiny town of Pfeifer, Kansas, in the northeast corner of Rush County near Hays, is slated to be the new home of a massive hog farming operation. It will be home to thousands of pigs, and their waste. It is a less than a mile from Urban’s home.


A new food safety website has been launched by two state agencies in Kansas.

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) and the Kansas Department of Agriculture (KDA) have partnered to launch FoodSafetyKansas.org.

The website can be used to submit instances of food-related illnesses and health-related complaints regarding restaurants and events such as with pests or employees not washing their hands. Complaints about food items purchased at a grocery or convenience store can also be submitted.

Kansas News Service/File photo


A former Kansas legislator who also served as the state agriculture secretary and as a senior official in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is running for governor.

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A new dairy processing plant is under construction in western Kansas. The Kansas Department of Agriculture says the facility could be an important catalyst to spur additional growth in the Kansas dairy sector.

Since 2010, total milk output in Kansas has increased 24 percent. Last year, the approximately 143,000 dairy cows in the state produced 3 billion pounds of milk, valued at nearly $750 million. In 2013, the dairy industry in Kansas supported more than 5,800 jobs and contributed just over $1 billion to the state’s economy.

State records show that fewer irrigators are pumping more water than they are allowed to use annually.

The Hutchinson News reports that 114 water right holders received a first-offense warning of civil penalties so far this year for over-pumping in 2013. Another 70 irrigators were warned a second, and, for a few, a third time for over-pumping, and issued a $1,000 fine and temporary cutbacks to their annual water use. A fourth offense results in a water right revocation.

The Kansas Department of Agriculture says it will take over food inspections in Sedgwick County rather than renew its present contract with the City of Wichita as a cost-saving move.

Its present contract with the city expires March 31, and state inspectors will take over the work on April 1.

The Agriculture Department says doing its own food inspections is projected to save $125,000 the first year, and $190,000 the second year and the years beyond that. It plans to hire six state inspectors to handle the work.