Kansas Department of Education

Lydia Liu

Kansas has received a federal grant worth $27 million to promote student literacy in schools across the state.

The grant is part of the U.S. Department of Education’s “Striving Reader Comprehensive Literacy Initiative,” which works to build literacy skills from birth through 12th grade. The program focuses in particular on English Language Learners and students with disabilities.

Courtesy Kansas State Department of Education

Fourteen schools in seven school districts across Kansas will work this year on revamping the way they serve children, with the goal of becoming statewide models for overhauling primary and secondary education.

The education department is branding the effort to re-envision schools as Kansas’ version of “a moon shot,” referring to the U.S. race to put a man on the moon in the 1960s.

Kansas News Service/File photo

School districts across Kansas are breathing a bit easier after the Legislature passed a school funding plan and a tax law that provides the money for it.

EducateKansas.org

Kansas' new plan to recruit more teachers kicked off Tuesday with a series of YouTube videos.

Kansas has been struggling with keeping veteran teachers and luring students into teacher prep programs.

Related: Kansas Is Becoming A Hard Place To Teach, So Teachers Are Crossing The State Line

Courtesy Partners for Wichita

A local program that provides free healthy meals for children at risk of hunger during the summer is asking for urgent help from the community.

The Filling the Gap Lunches for Kids program serves more than 800 children at more than a dozen sites in the Wichita area each day. But because Wichita’s public schools are starting later this year, the program will be providing meals to students for a week longer than expected.

Jim McClean / Heartland Health Monitor

The chairman of a Senate committee abruptly canceled a hearing today on a bill that would have changed the agency responsible for distributing school funding.

The bill would have moved the authority to distribute education money from the Department of Education to the Department of Administration, which is one of the governor’s cabinet agencies.

Shannan Muskopf, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas students' scores on national reading and math scores tended to rise and fall along with school funding levels, according to a report by the Kansas Association of School Boards.

The board says student performance on national math and reading tests improved between 2003 and 2007 before leveling off until 2011, when it began to fall, the Topeka Capital-Journal reported.

Sam Zeff / KCUR

The Kansas State Department of Education is moving full speed ahead towards its goal of perhaps drastically changing what is taught in public schools.

The department's top two officials brought their case to Johnson County educators and a few lawmakers Tuesday at the Olathe School District headquarters.

"Can we reinvent ourselves and hold on to what we have always done?" asked Kansas Education Commissioner Randy Watson, who took over KSDE in July.

Alberto G., flickr Creative Commons

Scores from a new state assessment of Kansas students were released last week. Even though the tests are brand new, there could be changes in the coming years. The goal of the new, more rigorous exams is to better judge what students know and if they’re on track to succeed in college or a career.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback urged school districts on Tuesday to move more money into the classroom and hold down the administrative costs of running their schools.

The Republican governor's comments came after he addressed educators at a training session in Wichita and lauded the Kansas Reading Roadmap initiative, a program that aims to improve reading levels in grades K-3.

Pages