Kansas Supreme Court

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service/File photo

This story was updated on Wednesday at 11:42 a.m.

Attorneys for the state and the Legislature faced a barrage of questions from skeptical Kansas Supreme Court justices Tuesday scrutinizing the Legislature’s school finance plan.

File Photo / Kansas Public Radio

The Gannon v. Kansas lawsuit is in its seventh year. In that time, the case has led to repeated rulings against the state for underfunding schools and responses by lawmakers in the form of appropriations bills.

What’s it all about? Here are five issues central to the battle.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service/File photo

Lawyers for Kansas and for dozens of school districts suing it filed briefs Friday at the Kansas Supreme Court, in what could be the final leg of a seven-year legal battle over school finance.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service/File photo

The Kansas legislative session may be over, but lawmakers still aren't sure whether their work has ended. They're waiting to see whether the new school funding system they put in place will satisfy the Kansas Supreme Court.

The court previously said education spending was inadequate. In response, lawmakers approved $300 million in new funding over two years and a new method to distribute the money.

Mark Tallman, with the Kansas Association of School Boards, says members of the group like the new funding formula, but they still have concerns.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW/File photo

Wichita Public Schools plans to keep its doors open this summer while it awaits the Kansas Supreme Court's ruling on a new school funding plan.

Kansas News Service/File photo

The Kansas Supreme Court has set a schedule for the latest chapter in the seven-year lawsuit that accuses the state of underfunding public schools.

kscourts.org

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt is calling on the state Supreme Court to move quickly and sign off on a new formula for funding K-12 schools. On Monday, the court will set a calendar of hearings.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

The Kansas House debated a new school finance plan for five hours Wednesday, taking up two dozen amendments and finally voting 81-40 to advance a bill not much different from the one that had come out of committee. The measure is slated to get a final vote in the House Thursday. Then it will be the Senate’s turn.

Department of Corrections

Editor's note: This post was updated at 4:00 p.m. 

Attorneys for two convicted murderers argued Thursday that the Kansas Supreme Court should overturn their death sentences. Jonathan and Reginald Carr were sentenced to death for murdering four people in Wichita in 2000.

Sarah Ellen Johnson, an attorney representing Jonathan Carr, called the original proceedings 15 years ago “filled” with errors to the point where it wasn’t a fair trial.

J. Schafer / KPR/File photo

A proposed school funding bill in Kansas would add $75 million to the public education system, but many educators say that’s far less than they expected and may not be enough to satisfy the state Supreme Court.

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