Kansas Supreme Court

Stephen Koranda file photo

Kansas lawmakers return to Topeka Wednesday for what was supposed to be the last day of the legislative session. However, the state Supreme Court ruled late Friday that lawmakers haven’t done enough to reduce funding disparities among school districts. That means there’s likely more work ahead for the Legislature.

Lawmakers shuffled school spending to reduce disparities, but the court says that didn’t fix the issue and in some ways made it worse. Justices say they’ll close Kansas schools if there isn’t a solution by the end of June.

Stephen Koranda, File Photo / Kansas Public Radio

The Kansas Supreme Court has handed down its decision in the long-awaited Gannon school funding case, and it comes as no surprise to those who have followed its many twists and turns.

“This case requires us to determine whether the State has met its burden to show that recent legislation brings the State's K-12 public school funding system into compliance with Article 6 of the Kansas Constitution,” the court wrote in an opinion not attributable to any individual judge. “We hold it has not.”

AP pool photo

The Senate race in Kansas isn't expected to be competitive and the governor isn't on the ballot this fall. So, the hardest-fought statewide campaign might just involve four people you’ve never heard of.

For the first time ever, there will be a coordinated effort to oust state Supreme Court justices.

Kansas GOP / Facebook

The Kansas Republican Party will vote Saturday on whether to support ousting some state Supreme Court justices.

The GOP’s proposed resolution points to gripes with the Kansas Supreme Court over death-penalty reprieves and rebukes of school finance policies.

Five Supreme Court justices are up for retention on the November ballot, but Republicans would be targeting just four.

“Be it resolved,” the resolution reads, “the Kansas Republican Party supports the non-retention of Justice Lawton Nuss, Justice Marla Luckert, Justice Carol Beier, and Justice Daniel Biles.”

alamosbasement, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas Supreme Court justices are mulling how to respond in a lawsuit over school funding. Justices previously said they could close schools if funding disparities among districts aren’t reduced. But as Stephen Koranda reports, an attorney yesterday offered an alternative option.

An attorney representing the state, Stephen McAllister, says if justices rule against the state they could strike down just part of the Kansas school funding system and let classes start in the fall.

Chris, flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas Supreme Court will hear arguments today in a lawsuit over school funding. At issue is whether lawmakers have done enough to reduce funding disparities among school districts. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, a ruling against the state will likely bring lawmakers back to Topeka for more work.

Abigail Wilson / KMUW

The USD 259 Board of Education will meet tonight.

Members of the public are scheduled to speak against about the possible closure of Metro Meridian Alternative High School and earlier start times for several schools. Both ideas are being considered by Wichita Public Schools as ways to save money for the upcoming school year.

Stephen Koranda, File Photo / Kansas Public Radio

Estimates for Kansas tax collections were ratcheted down sharply yesterday. The state’s projected revenues dropped by a quarter-billion dollars over the next year-and-a-half. That leaves Kansas with a budget deficit. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, Republican Gov. Sam Brownback is proposing plans for erasing the shortfall.

Jennifer Morrow / Flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas Supreme Court has agreed to review an appeals court ruling in January finding that the Kansas Constitution creates “a fundamental right to abortion.”

The high court’s decision was expected after the Kansas Court of Appeals upheld a trial judge’s decision to block Kansas’ so-called "dismemberment ban."

The 2015 ban was challenged by two Overland Park doctors who operate one of three abortion clinics in the state.

J. Stephen Conn, flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas Supreme Court has set a hearing for May 10 on a school funding plan aimed at reducing disparities between school districts.

Justices have threatened to close schools if the issue isn’t resolved by this summer. The date of the hearing might mean it isn’t fully settled by the time lawmakers want to end the session.

The so-called veto session starts the last week of April and traditionally lasts from a few days to a few weeks. Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt says a decision following the hearing could come quickly because justices seem to be working fast.

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