Kansas Supreme Court

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas lawmakers already know they’ll have some big issues on their plate during the next legislative session, which kicks off in January. There’s also uncertainty clouding the issues.

As Stephen Koranda reports, the Kansas Supreme Court heard arguments in a school funding lawsuit this fall, but justices haven’t yet handed down a decision.

kscourts.org

Despite a growing budget deficit, the Kansas court system will ask lawmakers for an extra $20 million to boost pay for court employees across the state.

A study released by the state Supreme Court paints a dismal picture: Pay for district court judges ranks 50th in the country, and some court employees have starting salary below the federal poverty level for a family of four.

In addition, according to the high court study, a third of judicial branch employees work more than one job, hardly a recipe for retaining experienced workers.

kscourts.org

After roughly a million dollars in TV and radio ads plus a blizzard of postcards, the Kansas Supreme Court didn't change one bit with Tuesday's elections.

With a majority of precincts reporting, all four of the justices who had been targeted by the Republican Party, Kansans for Life and other conservative groups comfortably won retention.

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According to the latest poll conducted by the Docking Institute of Public Affairs at Fort Hays State University, Kansas voters prefer Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump. 

Andy Marso / KHI/File photo

New campaign finance reports are calling into question Republican Gov. Sam Brownback’s insistence that he’s not involved in an effort to oust several Kansas Supreme Court justices.

Reports filed this week show that Brownback’s Road Map PAC contributed $65,000 to Kansans for Life in September and October, bringing the total since the first of the year to $110,300.

Stephen Koranda, File Photo / Kansas Public Radio

Gov. Sam Brownback is not taking a public stance on whether the state’s Supreme Court justices should be retained this election, but his political action committee has given thousands of dollars to a group fighting to oust four of the justices.

A new poll shows Kansans are leaning toward Donald Trump in the upcoming election, but the report also shows that they aren't satisfied with state politics in general.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Two former Kansas attorneys general, a Democrat and a Republican, say Kansas Supreme Court justices should keep their jobs. Five justices face retention elections this November.

The two former politicians have joined a campaign by the group Kansans for Fair Courts.

Former Attorneys General Bob Stephan and Steve Six say the Kansas justices have been fair and impartial in their rulings. They say a very small number of the court’s decision have been overturned on appeal, which shows the justices are doing good work.

The first TV spot has landed in the contentious battle to retain four Kansas Supreme Court justices in the November Election. The ad was paid for by Kansans for Fair Courts, the group backing retention.

The 30-second spot starts airing in the Wichita market on Friday. It takes on the two biggest issues Republicans and other conservatives are using against four of the five justices on the ballot: the death penalty and school finance.

The ad also tries to tie the ouster of the justices to Gov. Sam Brownback.

J. Stephen Conn / flickr Creative Commons

The building that houses the Kansas Supreme Court will need significant repairs after heavy rains seeped through a leaky roof.

Court spokeswoman Lisa Taylor says the building could need new walls, ceilings and flooring.

“We were in the middle of a re-roofing project, and we also were having a significant amount of rain, and suddenly the rain coming down outside was coming down inside in sheets,” Taylor says.

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