Marginalia

Marginalia is an on-air commentary and podcast hosted by KMUW's Beth Golay. Each episode features author interviews, editorial commentary and other marginalia to enhance the reading experience.

The Marginalia podcast is also available through iTunes and through Google Play.

Marginalia: Mohsin Hamid

May 16, 2017

In this podcast, I was able to visit by phone with Mohsin Hamid from his home in Lahore, Pakistan about his new novel, Exit West. The novel follows a young couple who fall in love in an unstable country and decide to migrate to other lands through magical portals. We visited about these literal open doors, human migration--especially in light of recent talk of proposed walls and travel bans, and children’s literature.

Here’s our conversation:

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That was Mohsin Hamid, author of a new novel Exit West which was published by Riverhead Books.

In this podcast, I visited with Patricia Lockwood about her new memoir, Priestdaddy. You see, her father is a married priest... rare, but not unheard of in the Catholic church. A few years ago, unusual circumstances forced Lockwood and her husband to move back home with her parents… only this home was a rectory in the Kansas City, Missouri diocese. Although she’s known for her fiction--and her tweets--Lockwood spent her time at ‘home’ penning this memoir.

Here’s our conversation:

And if you listened to the commentary on air, this is what you heard:

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Marginalia: Ulrich Boser

Apr 28, 2017

In this podcast, I visited with Ulrich Boser about his new book, Learn Better: Mastering the Skills for Success in Life, Business, and School, or, How to Become an Expert in Just about Anything.

Christopher Anderson Magnum Photos

In this podcast, I visited with Michael Finkel about his new book, The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit. The story is really Christopher Knight’s story. In 1986, Knight was 20 years old. He left his home and job in Massachusetts, drove to Maine, left his keys in his unlocked car and walked into the woods where he didn’t speak with another human being for 27 years. Okay, there was one time he encountered a hiker and said, “hi”--so that’s one syllable in 27 years.

Marginalia: Josh Barkan

Mar 17, 2017

In today’s podcast, I visited with Josh Barkan about his new book of stories, Mexico. He has divided his time between the United States and Mexico for several years, and many of these stories were derived from personal experience, as Josh explains in our conversation.

Here he is:

And if you listened to the Marginalia on air, here's what you heard:

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Mexico: Stories was published by Hogarth.

Thanks for joining us for Marginalia. Discover new episodes at kmuw.org or through iTunes. Marginalia was produced at KMUW - Wichita.

Marginalia: Elan Mastai

Mar 3, 2017
David Leyes

Although All Our Wrong Todays is Elan Mastai’s first novel, it’s not his first go at telling a story. It’s just a different medium. You see, Mastai comes to literature from the movie industry. He has written and produced movies such as “Alone in the Dark,” “The Samaritan” and “What If.” Perhaps it’s his background in film that makes All Our Wrong Todays so visually appealing. And there’s not an image to be seen.

Marginalia: Alex George

Feb 17, 2017
Shane Epping

Alex George is a novelist, a teacher, a lawyer, and founder of the Unbound Book Festival, which is held in Columbia, Missouri. 

Novelist. Teacher. Lawyer. Book Festival Founder. These are not small jobs. How does one juggle them all? I recently asked Alex George that question and more about his latest his latest book, Setting Free the Kites. Here’s our conversation:

And if you listened to the commentary on-air, this is what you heard:

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Setting Free the Kites was published by Putnam.

Adrian Harvey

I’ve been waiting for this moment forever. Well, since October… that’s almost forever. Right?

Last October, a bookseller friend recommended that I read Swimming Lessons by Claire Fuller. He was pretty insistent, and he tends to have impeccable reading taste, so I contacted the publisher to request an advance reading copy. The release date was February 7.

Emma Trim

We’ve all heard the warning, “Don’t judge a book by its cover.” We should probably add “don’t judge a book by it’s title” to the list of literary pitfalls to avoid. That’s especially the case with it comes to Brit Bennett’s The Mothers.

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