Movie Review

Movie reviewer Fletcher Powell shares his opinions on Hollywood's best efforts. Tune in every Thursday for the latest review.

The movie review can also be heard on iTunes. Listen or subscribe here.

It’s interesting what a movie can do to you. Last weekend, I saw the new horror film Hereditary. And when the lights came up, I felt just slightly underwhelmed. Like maybe I was missing something.

What do we do when one version of us dies? When we can no longer be the person we used to be? Where do we find meaning when our purpose has been taken from us?

First of all, it seems weird that people are worried that Solo: A Star Wars Story brought in only $103 million in its first four days of release -- $103 million is a lot of money!

“Ah, but Fletcher,” you say, “it’s not Star Wars money.” And that’s true. It’s not.

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It used to be that we didn’t expect that much from our TV movies. For a long time, there was a good reason a movie would head to television instead of the theater. 

I sat down to write this review of Melissa McCarthy’s new comedy Life of the Party, and I was prepared to be super snarky. That generic title, the uninspired storyline -- it was ripe for me to really dig my teeth into it.

But then… I couldn’t do it.

In 2007, screenwriter Diablo Cody burst onto the scene with the movie Juno. It was her first screenplay and it earned her an Oscar, as well as a nomination for Best Picture, among others.

A while back, I went to see Marvel’s Black Panther with my nephew. He surprised me when, just as the first battle scene was starting, he stood up and announced, “I’m going to the bathroom, the fights are boring.”

Ah, yes, the kid takes after his uncle.

For one day, at least—last Friday—the top movie at the box office didn’t star The Rock or a Marvel super hero. No, the country’s #1 movie was a sequel to a 16-year-old quasi-stoner-comedy that made all of $18 million in its entire theatrical run. I’m speaking of Super Troopers 2, coming hot on the heels of 2002’s Super Troopers, both made by the apparently still-existing comedy troupe Broken Lizard.

Once, when I was young, my dog ran away. She ran out the door into the rain and never came back. I was heartbroken. After a few days we checked the Humane Society, just in case.

We’re dumped right into the middle of the story in A Quiet Place. It’s about three months after something apocalyptic has happened, and we’re with a family taking items from an abandoned grocery store. But despite the fact that there’s clearly no one else around, they’re moving, and searching, and communicating, without… making… a sound.

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