Movie Review

Movie reviewer Fletcher Powell shares his opinions on Hollywood's best efforts. Tune in every Thursday for the latest review.

The movie review can also be heard on iTunes. Listen or subscribe here.

The Lost City of Z—or The Lost City of Zed, as our British hero calls it—tells the true story of the early-20th-century explorer Percy Fawcett. While on a surveying expedition in the Amazon, Fawcett uncovered what he considered to be evidence of a lost civilization, the proverbial city of gold. He took his findings back to England, where he was met with not just skepticism but outright derision—how could civilization like this exist among the savages of South America? And how, as Fawcett suggested, could it even predate the great civilization of Britain?

I’d rather not spend all of my time comparing T2: Trainspotting to the original Trainspotting, but the mere fact that they’ve made a sequel after 20 years to one of the most stylistically influential movies of these past two decades practically demands comparison.

As complicated as it is, it probably makes the most sense to start out by trying to tell you the basic plot of Your Name, which has rocketed to become the highest grossing anime film of all time.

Not to get too cute, but Ghost In the Shell has a gorgeous shell with almost nothing inside.

At first glance, Wilson, both the movie and the title character, seems cynical and misanthropic. But I don’t actually believe that’s the case.

The Sense of an Ending is a small British drama based on a Booker Prize-winning novel of the same name. But don’t let the size of the movie fool you—the humanity on display far exceeds what seem to be modest cinematic goals.

Warner Bros.

Kong: Skull Island is about exactly what you’d expect from a movie called Kong: Skull Island. That’s not necessarily a criticism.

What happens when our superheroes get old? It’s essentially something that never happens in our movies, where our heroes are always virile and robust, and if they get a little long in the tooth, we just reboot the series and start over with a younger model. But that’s not the case with Logan, which follows maybe the most famous of the X-Men, Wolverine, as he not only deals with his own broken-down body, but with nursing the longtime leader of the X-Men, professor Charles Xavier.

It turns out none of us is quite as forward-thinking as we’d like to imagine we are. That’s one of the major takeaways from Get Out, the incisive new thriller from Jordan Peele of TV’s sketch comedy duo Key & Peele. And the movie itself is funny, though it’s certainly not a comedy. It’s first and foremost a real horror movie, one with serious racial tones, and one that pulls no punches.

Give The Great Wall credit for at least one thing: It gets straight to the point. 

Pages