Obamacare

Misha Popovikj / flickr Creative Commons

Three of Kansas’ four members of the U.S. House of Representatives voted for a budget resolution late last week that paves the way for the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Lynn Jenkins joined Kevin Yoder and Roger Marshall in voting for the resolution that will allow the Republican-led Congress to start erasing major parts of the health reform law.

Rep. Mike Pompeo, President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee to head the Central Intelligence Agency, didn’t vote.

Marshall says Republicans are eager to take Obamacare off the books.

healthcare.gov

Wyandotte County civic and government leaders are calling on the Kansas congressional delegation to oppose repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

A statement from Kansas City, Kansas, Mayor Mark Holland says Obamacare is working, and repealing it would leave 6,000 Wyandotte County residents without health coverage.

Abigail Beckman / KMUW

President-elect Donald Trump is planning to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act within the first 100 days of his administration, a move that will most likely stop efforts to expand the federal Medicaid program. The decision to expand or not was left up to state legislatures, and so far, Kansas lawmakers have chosen not to expand the state's privatized Medicaid program known as KanCare.

healthcare.gov

Obamacare enrollment is up over last year across the country but not in Kansas.

The deadline for selecting Obamacare coverage that kicks in at the start of the new year just passed. And so far, nearly 6.5 million Americans have selected marketplace plans – an increase of 400,000 over last year.

But enrollment is down by more than 10,000 here in Kansas, where consumers have fewer coverage options to select from. About 73,000 Kansans have enrolled in Obamacare plans compared to nearly 85,000 at this time last year.

healthcare.gov

Close to 25,000 Kansans have signed up for health insurance through the online marketplace, despite uncertainty about the future of the Affordable Care Act under a new administration.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service reported Wednesday that 24,778 people in Kansas had signed up for insurance since open enrollment for 2017 started Nov. 1. The number of people seeking insurance was up less than 2 percent compared to the same period during open enrollment last year.

Alex Smith / KCUR

Last week’s election results stunned a lot of people who get health insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act.

President-elect Donald Trump and the Republican-controlled Congress say they want to scrap the law, but what might replace it remains unknown.

That has left many Kansas and Missouri families in limbo, unsure what will become of their medical care.

Subconsci Productions / flickr Creative Commons

Health care costs under the Affordable Care Act are up this year in Kansas—for some plans, it’s by nearly 50 percent. But many customers aren't expected to feel that impact.

A new analysis prepared for the Associated Press shows premiums will increase by as much as 46 percent.

healthcare.gov

Federal health officials say headlines about anticipated premium increases on the Obamacare health insurance marketplace overlook an important point: Most Americans, including two-thirds of Kansans, will still be able to find a plan with a premium of $75 a month, or less.

Bryan Thompson / Heartland Health Monitor

A recent report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says rural Americans are gaining health insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act at rates outpacing their urban counterparts.

Mark Andes was living and working in McPherson last year when he began having some pretty scary symptoms.

“I was getting dizzy, and falling to my left, and started getting weak," he says. "I couldn’t even hardly tear a piece of paper.”

healthcare.gov

Federal health officials plan to focus on enrolling young adults in the Health Insurance Marketplace when open enrollment begins again this fall. As Heartland Health Monitor’s Bryan Thompson explains, that will protect them from the costs of unexpected illness or accidents, and make insurance more affordable for everyone else.

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