Past and Present

Three Wichita State history professors, Drs. Robin Henry, Robert Weems, and Jay Price, will talk about Wichita history, parallels between current events and historical happenings, and how historical events got us to where we are today.

Nati Harnik/AP

A long-standing philosophical debate in American history involves people who believe in unfettered economic development versus those who believe that limits must be placed on the business-related depletion and damage of natural resources.

Fletcher Powell / KMUW

Next year, the Public History Program at Wichita State University will officially become the Local and Community History Program.

Public Domain

The United States Congress ratified the Louisiana Purchase Treaty on October 20th, 1803, officially transferring 826,000 square miles of land from French to American ownership for $15 million.

It’s considered one of the greatest real estate deals in history. But at the time, purchasing the land between the Mississippi River and the Rocky Mountains presented constitutional and political questions for the United States.

Getty Images

Pope Francis’s recent triumphant visit to the United States, which included a speech to a joint session of Congress, suggests that one instance of historic prejudice has dramatically receded in this country.

While working on the African Americans of Wichita book project, I was struck by how many prominent figures of the 20th century were veterinarians. For example, Dr. Thomas G. Perry opened the first small animal hospital on Cleveland Street in 1921, later joining the faculty of Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. Other figures included Dr. G. T. Bronson, Tuskegee airman Dr. Don Jackson and Dr. T. E. McDonald.

Given that my father is a veterinarian, the number of animal doctors in the community definitely caught my attention.

Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

The United States designates the first Monday of September as a day to honor the contributions of American workers and the achievements of the American labor movement.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr / Creative Commons

The embryonic Republican presidential primary season has witnessed the startling rise of Donald Trump in early polling. As the current frontrunner among a crowd of other GOP presidential hopefuls, the bombastic Trump, a real estate mogul and former host of hit television series "The Apprentice," has predictably attracted increased criticism from his fellow competitors. One of the charges directed his way is that he is a rich “reality TV star” with little concrete political experience.

What's In A Name?

Aug 11, 2015

Wichitans are getting used to flying out of Dwight D. Eisenhower Airport, now that the old name of Mid-Continent has been retired.

National Photo Company, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs

On July 28, 1868, Secretary of State William H. Seward issued a proclamation certifying the ratification of the 14th Amendment to the U.S, Constitution. This amendment extended citizenship to anyone born in the United States; guaranteed equal protection, due process, and privileges and immunities; and tasked the federal government to enforce these rights for all citizens.

eyeliam / Flickr / Creative Commons


The aftermath of the recent church massacre in Charleston, S.C., has featured renewed discussion concerning the appropriateness of publicly displaying the Confederate flag.

From a political standpoint, it is astonishing that this is considered a debatable issue. The Confederate flag is an overt symbol of treason and insurrection. Moreover, from a historical standpoint, the continued visibility of the “Stars and Bars” suggests that, while the military conflict known as the Civil War ended 150 years ago, the Confederate mindset continued.