Past and Present

Three Wichita State history professors, Drs. Robin Henry, Robert Weems, and Jay Price, will talk about Wichita history, parallels between current events and historical happenings, and how historical events got us to where we are today.

Past & Present is also available through iTunes. Listen or subscribe here.

A person standing at Broadway and 21st Street can see how immigration has reshaped the urban landscape. 

http://www.suffragewagonnewschannel.com/

On November 27th and 28th 1917, the federal government succumbed to public outcry and released the National Women’s Party picketers from the Occoquan Workhouse. The events leading up to this capitulation advanced discussion of women’s suffrage, but at great cost to members of the National Women’s Party.

By any objective measure, Donald Trump appears headed toward being regarded as the worst president in American history. Ten months into his presidency, even with a Republican majority in the U.S. House and Senate, Trump has yet to sign any meaningful legislation into law. 

Beth Golay / KMUW

This time of year brings out tales of haunted places. One such place is Theorosa’s Bridge, situated north of Valley Center where 109th Street crosses Jester Creek. Local legend says that the ghost of a woman haunts it, distraught over the loss of her baby who was drowned in the creek. Uttering the phrase “Theorosa, I have your baby” results in the irate spectre going after the speaker.

Public Domain

This commentary originally aired on October 20, 2015.

The United States Congress ratified the Louisiana Purchase Treaty on October 20th, 1803, officially transferring 826,000 square miles of land from French to American ownership for $15 million.

It’s considered one of the greatest real estate deals in history. But at the time, purchasing the land between the Mississippi River and the Rocky Mountains presented constitutional and political questions for the United States.

The Insular Cases are a series of U.S. Supreme Court cases decided in 1901 concerning the status of U.S. territories and their peoples acquired by the United States in the Spanish-American War.

Past & Present: North End

Sep 19, 2017
wichita.edu

A Google Maps search for Wichita lists the area north of 21st Street and west of Broadway as “El Pueblo.” The more common community name for the area is the more generic “North End.”

U.S. presidents have long sought to communicate with the American people on a variety of pertinent issues. With the advent of radio in the early twentieth-century, this task became much easier.

As a nation, Americans continue to hit the snooze button on much-needed conversations about race and the legacies of slavery.

The summer of 1958 was significant in the story of Wichita and the nation. On May 31, young entrepreneurs Dan and Frank Carney opened their first Pizza Hut at Bluff and Kellogg. During the summer of that year, pizza’s popularity in Wichita took off.

Meanwhile, in downtown Wichita, another set of youth were making their mark. On July 19, ten African American students entered the Dockum drug store at Douglas and Broadway, sat down at the soda fountain, and when they refused to leave, caused the store to shut down the lunch counter.

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