Sam Brownback

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

Kansas lawmakers have charted a change of course when it comes to tax policy. Both the House and Senate voted Tuesday night to override a veto from Gov. Sam Brownback and roll back many of the 2012 tax cuts. That means the tax increase--which totals $1.2 billion over two years--will become law despite Brownback’s objection.

Office of the Governor

Kansas lawmakers are gearing up for an attempt to override Gov. Sam Brownback’s veto of a tax increase. The House and Senate approved the plan overnight Monday and Brownback vetoed it Tuesday.

Kansas News Service/File photo

On Day 108 of the Kansas Legislature’s session, lawmakers got down to business. They passed a school funding bill that adds nearly $300 million over two years for public education, then they approved a $1.2 billion tax plan.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

Kansas lawmakers sent Gov. Sam Brownback a bill that would allow public health care facilities to continue banning concealed guns. The bill landed on his desk Monday, but Brownback is saying little about what action he might take.

Under state law, most public places must allow concealed weapons by this summer or install security to keep all guns out.

J. Schafer / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

Kansas Lawmakers aren’t yet in record territory, but they’re facing challenges that could make the 2017 session among the longest ever.

Lawmakers must close a budget gap that now stands just south of $1 billion -- and increase funding for public schools by enough to get them off the hook with the Kansas Supreme Court.

Big challenges, but particularly tough now for a couple of reasons: First is the mismatch between conservative Republican leaders and a majority coalition of moderate Republicans and Democrats.

401(K) 2012 / Flickr Creative Commons

A recent poll of voters in Kansas shows wide support for repealing Gov. Sam Brownback’s 2012 tax plan.

The nonpartisan Kansas Center for Economic Growth found that roughly 67 percent of the voters surveyed disapprove of Brownback’s tax cut package -- which cut income taxes and removed taxes on many businesses. Approximately 7 in 10 voters who responded said the tax plan has hurt the state’s economy and the middle class.

File Photo / KCUR

Gov. Sam Brownback’s approval rating among Kansans continues to flounder and ranks lower than that of President Donald Trump, according to the spring Kansas Speaks survey released Tuesday.

The survey, published twice a year by the Docking Institute of Public Affairs at Fort Hays State University, found that Brownback has an approval rating of 21 percent, while 56 percent said they are “very dissatisfied” with him. The very dissatisfied number is down from the 62 percent the governor received a year ago.

Stephen Koranda / KMUW

Gov. Sam Brownback on Friday signed a bill tightening penalties for felony crimes against law enforcement officers in Kansas.

He noted that the bill signing comes the same day people gathered at the Statehouse to remember officers who have died in the line of duty.

“Here’s a tangible piece of evidence of how the public feels about law enforcement and a thank you and a recognition of that sacrifice that law enforcement puts forward,” Brownback said.

Jim McLean / Kansas News Service

The University of Kansas Health System and a Tennessee-based for-profit hospital chain have agreed to rescue a troubled Topeka hospital despite possible changes in federal health policy that could hurt Kansas providers.

Officials from the KU Health System and Ardent Health Services, the nation’s second-largest privately owned for-profit hospital chain, announced Thursday that they had signed a letter of intent to acquire St. Francis Health.

Paul Joseph / Flickr Creative Commons

Kansas grocery and convenience stores will be able to sell regular beer starting in 2019 after a years-long effort to get full-strength brews into the stores.

Republican Gov. Sam Brownback signed a bill Tuesday allowing grocery and convenience stores to sell beer with up to 6 percent alcohol by volume. They can now sell cereal malt beverage with 3.2 percent alcohol by weight. In exchange, liquor stores will be able to sell cereal malt beverages and more non-alcoholic products, such as shot glasses, mixers, lottery tickets and tobacco products.

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