state budget

Sean Sandefur file photo

Republican Gov. Sam Brownback's office is working to determine when it would have to inform state workers they would be furloughed if a budget is not passed on time, the governor's spokeswoman said Wednesday.

The Legislature already is in overtime on its 90-day session, with Wednesday being its 97th day, and has yet to pass a balanced budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1. Spokeswoman Sara Belfry said the governor's office is working with several agencies to "determine the last possible date" the budget would need to be passed in order to avoid payroll disruptions.

Bugsy, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas House members will debate a bill Tuesday that aims to eliminate a projected shortfall of more than $330 million dollars in the state's current budget.

The bill would mostly divert highway funds and shift other funds around to patch holes in the funding for general government programs.

The shortfall is in the state's main bank account.

The state's budget problems arose after lawmakers aggressively cut personal income taxes in 2012 and 2013, at Gov. Sam Brownback's urging, to stimulate the economy.

The current budget runs through June.

Governor Sam Brownback isn't publicly ruling out any ideas for helping to close state budget shortfalls.

State officials and lawmakers are speculating about the proposals he's expected to roll out before the Legislature convenes next month.

Governor Brownback's administration is working on a plan to close combined shortfalls of more than $700 million dollars in the current and next state budgets.

Stephen Koranda

A new revenue forecast shows Kansas needs to cut $279 million dollars to balance the current fiscal year's budget.

A $436 million-dollar deficit is ahead for the coming fiscal year.

Governor Sam Brownback says tax cuts he pushed would cause lower collections in the short term, but the revenues will rebound as the state's economy grows.

The governor's budget director, Shawn Sullivan, agrees.

State lawmakers have drafted a budget deal that includes a bonus for state workers.

Three senators and three House members agreed Thursday on budget legislation. They shook a gloomy state revenue report and ignored that the state’s bond rating has been downgraded by Moody’s Investor Services.

The proposal now includes $11 million dollars to give the state’s nearly 38,000 state employees a one-time, $250 bonus.

The budget agreement also preserves guaranteed longevity bonuses for employees with at least 10 years in state government.

Kansas House and Senate budget negotiators have begun working on a spending agreement; they’ve also cast aside a bleak revenue report that could undermine a rosier economic forecast leaders are using to justify higher spending.

The talks started last night, just a few hours after the state Revenue Department reported that April’s tax collections totaled $92 million dollars less than expected.

State officials blamed changes in the federal tax code on capital gains and other income.

Kansas ended 2013 with budget revenues on target, beating the fiscal year to date estimates by $4.3 million dollars.

The state Department of Revenue's report says Kansas' receipts were $3.3 million dollars, or almost 1 percent, more than expected.

Corporate income revenue receipts were up almost almost 7 percent-- in part because corporations made about $10 million more in payments this month compared to December 2012.

The Department of Revenue says this indicates that corporations had larger profits compared to the prior year.

Gov. Sam Brownback says he's accepted the resignation of state Budget Director Steve Anderson. The governor commended his work and diligence.

Anderson will leave his office, effective the end of this month. He says he's taking more time with his wife and sons.

Anderson is a certified public accountant and managing partner of Anderson, Reichert and Anderson, LLC. The governor named him budget director in late 2010. As a member of the Governor's Economic Growth Team, he worked to strengthen the economy and create jobs for Kansans.

Legislature Prepares For Budget Meetings

Mar 25, 2013

Kansas House and Senate negotiators have delayed the start of talks aimed at smoothing out differences between the budgets passed in each chamber.

The meeting originally scheduled for early Monday afternoon was canceled because the Senate had not yet officially appointed that chamber's three negotiators.

Kan. House, Senate Ready To Negotiate Budget Differences

Mar 25, 2013

The Kansas House and Senate have passed their versions of both budget and tax plans, but there's still plenty of work ahead. The two chambers will now try to smooth out differences between the plans.

Conference committees made up of three members from each chamber will work to find a compromise between the different bills. Both chambers will then consider the compromise legislation.

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