state revenue

okpolicy.org

The Wichita chapter of the Society for Professional Journalists is hosting a talk Tuesday night about the Kansas budget and the state’s tax policy.

The event will feature Annie McKay, executive director of the Kansas Center for Economic Growth and the incoming president and CEO of Kansas Action for Children. KCEG describes itself as nonpartisan and was created in 2013 to educate Kansans about the state’s economic policies.

Kansas is reporting that its tax collections last month were $2.6 million more than expected, giving state officials a small dose of good news in dealing with ongoing budget problems.

The Department of Revenue reported Monday that the state collected $584.3 million in taxes in April, when the official projection was $581.7 million. The surplus was 0.5 percent.

Doug Kerr, flickr Creative Commons

Gov. Sam Brownback’s three options for balancing the state budget include taking about $185 million from the highway fund.

As a result, the Kansas Department of Transportation is holding off on 25 major projects, including two in Reno and Harvey counties.

Fourteen projects will be delayed in fiscal year 2017 at an estimated construction cost of $271 million; 9 projects are on hold in the fiscal year 2018 at an estimated construction cost of $247 million; and two projects are on hold in fiscal year 2019 at an estimated construction cost of $35 million.

Stephen Koranda, File Photo / Kansas Public Radio

Estimates for Kansas tax collections were ratcheted down sharply yesterday. The state’s projected revenues dropped by a quarter-billion dollars over the next year-and-a-half. That leaves Kansas with a budget deficit. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, Republican Gov. Sam Brownback is proposing plans for erasing the shortfall.

Stephen Koranda

Tax collections in Kansas were more than $50 million short of estimates last month. That puts the state back into a budget deficit. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, the numbers prompted the governor to announce a cut to university budgets.

Kansas came up short on individual income, corporate income and sales tax collections.

Ervins Strauhmanis, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas collected $27 million less than expected in taxes last month, largely driven by sagging income and sales tax receipts. The drop is enough to erase the state’s small estimated savings account.

Kansas Secretary of Revenue Nick Jordan says it’s too early to tell if it’s a one-time drop in income taxes or a trend.

“It is the first time this fiscal year that individual income tax receipts have not grown compared to the prior fiscal year to date,” Jordan says.

Stephen Koranda

Kansas tax collections beat projections last month. Taxes were $8 million above estimates and adding in other sources of state revenue brings the November surplus to more than $15 million.

Kansas Secretary of Revenue Nick Jordan says individual income taxes and retail sales taxes were two of the bright spots in the month of November.

“We aren’t going to throw too big a party yet, but it’s one month and it’s a good sign that there’s been some growth this month,” Jordan says.

Stephen Koranda file photo

Gov. Sam Brownback says Kansas has "a good shot" at making its new revenue projections and avoiding a deficit in its current budget.

Brownback told reporters Monday that he's hoping a new fiscal forecast will hold and, "We'll be in fine shape."

University economists, legislative researchers and officials in Brownback's administration issued the new forecast Friday. It slashed $354 million from projections for state revenues from now through June 2017.

Stephen Koranda File Photo

Gov. Sam Brownback is taking some budget options off the table for now in the face of sagging revenue numbers.

Stephen Koranda file photo

Kansas is only three months into a new fiscal year and already tax collections have come in below estimates in each of the three months.

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