tax revenue

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

August tax collections in Kansas topped estimates by more than $8 million.

The state Department of Revenue reported $460 million in tax collections last month, ahead of its official projection of $452 million.

The AP reports that since Kansas' current budget year began on July 1, that state has collected a total of $914 million in taxes, about $16 million more than projected.

Kansas Revenue Secretary Sam Williams said it's too early to tell whether economic growth is boosting revenues.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas says it collected $7.6 million more in taxes than anticipated in July during its first month under an income tax increase approved by legislators.

The Department of Revenue reported Tuesday that the state collected $453.5 million in taxes. That's 1.7 percent more than the official projection of almost $446 million.

The surplus in July collections came after the state ended its 2017 fiscal year on June 30 with tax collections exceeding expectations by $72 million, or 1 percent. Total tax collections for fiscal 2017 surpassed $5.8 billion.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

The state of Kansas saw a bump in tax collections in June, with revenues coming in significantly more than expected. That means Kansas ends the fiscal year with $70 million more than anticipated. Total tax collections over the year were $5.8 billion.

Sales, corporate and personal income taxes all beat estimates in June, meaning the month's tax collections topped estimates by $72 million. The June tax collections are a growth of almost 6 percent over the same month in 2016. Fiscal year 2017 revenues grew a total of 1 percent over fiscal year 2016.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas collected slightly more in taxes than it had expected in April.

The state Department of Revenue reported Monday that tax collections last month were $1.8 million more than anticipated.

The state collected about $639 million in taxes when it had anticipated about $637 million. The surplus for the month is 0.3 percent.

The report comes less than two weeks after state officials and university economists revised revenue projections through June 2019. The new forecast was a little more optimistic than the previous one issued in November.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

A panel of Kansas officials has boosted the forecast for the state’s tax collections. They raised the revenue projection by almost $160 million.

That puts a dent in the Kansas budget deficit. After accounting for the new money, the state still faces a shortfall of around $900 million over the coming two fiscal years.

“There certainly remain big challenges for legislators and us between now and when the session ends,” said Shawn Sullivan, Gov. Sam Brownback’s budget director.

However, Sullivan added that "up is better than down."

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

A group of state officials and university economists will meet on Thursday to update the forecast for how much the state will collect in taxes.

The numbers provided by the Consensus Revenue Estimating Group give Kansas lawmakers a better idea of the state’s finances as they work to write a new budget plan for the coming fiscal year.

The group might change the economic projections it made earlier. If that happens, the budget deficit facing lawmakers will either grow or shrink.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

The state of Kansas didn’t collect as much in taxes as expected last month.

However, the state is still ahead for the current fiscal year.

The Department of Revenue reported that the state collected nearly $425 million in taxes in March.

Total tax collections were nearly $12 million below expectations for the month. State sales tax receipts were $2.3 million more than anticipated while individual income tax receipts were $11.1 million below expectations for March.

The shortfall ends the state’s four-month streak of tax collections that exceeded expectations.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas is reporting that it collected $24 million more in taxes than it anticipated in January as the Legislature wrestles with closing a shortfall in the current budget.

The state Department of Revenue's report Wednesday was good news for lawmakers. It is the third consecutive month that tax collections have exceeded expectations.

The department said Kansas collected $544 million in taxes last month. The figure is 4.6 percent higher than the $520 million anticipated.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

For the last two months, Kansas has met its state tax collection targets. That hasn’t happened for quite some time. Some state officials think it might be the start of a trend, while others aren’t so sure.

After the state lowered its revenue estimate, Kansas met the new forecast for November and December. Incoming Senate Majority Leader Jim Denning told the Topeka Capital- Journal that he thinks Kansas now has a handle on the revenue numbers and will be consistently hitting them.

Gov. Sam Brownback says he sees some positive signs, but he isn’t as upbeat as Denning.

Stephen Koranda

Kansas tax collections beat the estimate in December by $6 million.

Individual income taxes and sales tax receipts were higher than expected last month in Kansas. That helped outweigh drops in other areas like corporate income and cigarette taxes.

Acting Revenue Secretary Sam Williams says he hopes the sales tax jump is an indication that some sectors of the state economy are improving.

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