tax revenue

A new report has some advice for Kansas lawmakers looking at revenue growth that’s beating projections: Don’t count on all of it to last.

The report from the Pew Charitable Trusts outlines strategies states can use to manage growing revenue and maintain balanced budgets.

It recommends that states watch tax collections closely, because some types of tax growth will sag if the economy slows.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio/File photo

The state is reporting that it collected $108 million more than expected in May to give the state a full year's worth of monthly revenue surpluses.

The state Department of Revenue on Friday attributed the surge's size to last-minute income tax payments in mid-April not being processed until early May. But Kansas hasn't seen a 12-month streak of better-than-expected tax collections since at least January 1989.

The state collected $555 million in taxes last month when it projected $447 million. The surplus was 24.1 percent.

The Kansas House killed a tax cut bill on its way out the door Friday, ending the 2018 session with yet another signal that this isn’t the same conservative-dominated body of just two years ago.

This is the Legislature that voted last year to expand Medicaid and end then-Gov. Sam Brownback’s signature 2012 tax cuts with a two-year, $1.2 billion tax hike.

House and Senate negotiators struck a tentative deal Wednesday to prevent changes in federal tax law from ratcheting up state taxes for Kansans.

The Senate wanted broader tax cuts in the same bill, but couldn’t coax the House team to go along.

Rep. Steve Johnson, who chairs the House tax committee, said his chamber didn’t want to go beyond addressing the federal impact in ways that would produce deeper cuts to state government revenue.

“It’s all of the tax cuts and these targeted tax cuts that have given us heartburn,” he said.

Kansas reported Thursday that it collected nearly $27 million more in taxes than anticipated in February.

The report from the state Department of Revenue was more good news for legislators as they face a Kansas Supreme Court mandate to increase spending on public schools. It was the ninth consecutive month that tax collections have exceeded expectations.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas is reporting that it collected $165 million more in taxes than expected in January, and its top tax official sees the surplus resulting from changes in federal tax laws.

Revenue Secretary Sam Williams said Thursday that federal tax changes enacted late last year encouraged people to pay state and local tax bills before 2017 ended.

The Department of Revenue reported that Kansas took in nearly $747 million in taxes last month. The state had expected tax collections of $582 million.

The monthly surplus is more than 28 percent.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas policymakers are closely monitoring monthly revenue reports to determine whether the tax increases passed last June have stabilized the state’s budget. However, recent changes in federal tax law could complicate things.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas is reporting that it collected $8.5 million more in taxes than anticipated in November. It was the sixth consecutive month with higher-than-expected revenues.

The Department of Revenue reported Friday that the state collected $463.5 million in taxes last month. The official projection was $455 million, and the surplus is 1.9 percent.

It was the first monthly report on tax collections since state officials revised revenue projections Nov. 2. The state's new fiscal forecast is more optimistic than the previous one issued in April.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas is reporting that it collected nearly $32 million more in taxes than anticipated in October.

It was the fifth consecutive month tax collections exceeded expectations.

The Department of Revenue reported Wednesday that state took in nearly $501 million in taxes last month. Its official forecast predicted $469 million. The surplus was 6.8 percent.

Since the current budget year began in July, tax collections are $105 million ahead of expectations, or 5.5 percent.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Kansas is reporting that it collected $57 million more in taxes than anticipated in September.

It was the fourth consecutive month that tax collections have exceeded projections from the state's official fiscal forecast.

The state Department of Revenue said Monday that nearly $603 million in taxes was collected last month. That was 10.5 percent more than the official estimate of $545 million.

Since the fiscal year began July 1, the state has collected $73 million more than anticipated, with tax collections of $1.5 billion exceeding expectations by 5.1 percent.

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