taxes

Stephen Koranda

Kansans will pay higher sales and cigarette taxes under a tax plan approved by a single vote Sunday in the state Senate. The tax increases are needed to balance the state budget. But as Jim McLean reports, the House hasn’t yet considered the plan. That vote is scheduled for Monday afternoon.

The Kansas Senate has approved a new plan for raising sales and cigarette taxes to close a projected budget shortfall.

The 21-17 vote Sunday represented the first time this year that the chamber has approved a plan for raising enough new revenues to balance the budget. The action came on the 108th day of an annual legislative session that is now the longest in state history.

Courtesy / Wichita State University

Wichita State University is preparing for the possibility of furloughs if the state legislature does not pass a funded budget by the end of this week. KMUW’s Aileen LeBlanc reports...

The State House passed a budget on Wednesday, but not one that has tax increases to pay for it. WSU put their “what-if caps” on and announced that they are making plans.

Stephen Koranda

The Kansas Senate has approved a bill creating an amnesty program for delinquent taxpayers and decreasing the state's sales tax on food.

The measure approved Wednesday on a 25-13 vote also attempts to limit local property taxes.

The bill does little to close the projected $406 million budget shortfall for the fiscal year beginning July 1. But the Senate's action sets up negotiations with the House over other tax proposals.

Stephen Koranda file photo

The Kansas House is set to debate a budget agreement later today, but the plan the House will consider needs around $400 million in tax increases to balance.

House members had been waiting for a tax agreement, but over the last week several tax plans have faltered. The top budget writer in the Kansas House, Ron Ryckman, says passing a spending plan will help them avoid state employee furloughs.

Stephen Koranda file photo

The Kansas Senate rejected another tax proposal last night, wrapping up day 102 of the legislative session without a tax plan in place. The proposal would have raised sales and cigarette taxes, but also eliminated income taxes for some low-income Kansans. As KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports, it was patterned after a proposal introduce by Gov. Sam Brownback.

Kansas Legislature

Governor Sam Brownback’s administration says the governor will veto any tax bills that include a roll-back of business income tax cuts. Brownback’s secretary of revenue made that announcement over the weekend. But Republican Representative Mark Hutton, from Wichita, says he’ll keep pushing for a change in business income tax rules.

Stephen Koranda file photo

The Kansas secretary of revenue says Republican Governor Sam Brownback will veto any attempts to roll back business income tax cuts. Secretary Nick Jordan told a group of senators yesterday that Brownback was opposed to any broad changes to business tax rules.

More than 300,000 business owners pay zero state income tax because of the 2012 tax cut, and some lawmakers want to look at amending that to help close a budget gap.

Senate Republican Majority Leader Terry Bruce believes the governor has shut the door on that issue for now.

Stephen Koranda

TOPEKA, Kan. -- Aggressive messages from top aides to Republican Gov. Sam Brownback and the prospect of furloughs for state workers still couldn't push a new plan from GOP leaders for raising taxes to close a budget shortfall through the state Senate early Monday morning.

Kansas House members are preparing to debate proposals for raising sales, tobacco and business taxes to close a projected budget shortfall.

Republican leaders in the GOP-dominated chamber put three tax bills on Friday's agenda. Top Republicans hope the House passes at least one.

Lawmakers must close a $406 million budget shortfall for the fiscal year beginning July 1. The gap arose after they cut income taxes in 2012 and 2013 at Republican Gov. Sam Brownback's urging to stimulate the economy.

One key issue is increasing the state's 6.15 percent sales tax.

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