taxes

Stephen Koranda

Kansas tax collections have been lagging behind expectations in recent months. A group of economists and state officials will meet today to update the revenue projections, which are used when lawmakers write the budget. KPR’s Stephen Koranda reports on what could be amended.

Stephen Koranda

Lawmakers are studying Kansas tax credits and exemptions to see if they’re still worth keeping.

A special committee met Thursday to begin reviewing the state’s tax policy. Republican Sen. Ty Masterson says they may not name specific credits and exemptions to eliminate, but instead recommend a regular process to find ones that are no longer working.  

Nick Ares, flickr Creative Commons

New numbers show Kansas revenues were $15 million short of estimates in October. So far this fiscal year, the state has brought in $57 million less than expected.

Kansas income tax collections beat the estimate significantly, but that was outweighed by drops in other areas like sales taxes. Republican Secretary of Revenue Nick Jordan said in a statement that Kansas is following a national trend with these sluggish sales tax numbers.

Stephen Koranda File Photo

Gov. Sam Brownback is taking some budget options off the table for now in the face of sagging revenue numbers.

Tax revenues in Kansas were $30 million below estimates for the month of August.

The state’s revenue numbers were dragged down by large tax refunds given to companies as part of economic development programs.

Secretary of Revenue Nick Jordan says the economic development programs are considered when writing the estimates, but this month included especially large refunds.

401(K) 2012, flickr Creative Commons

Kansans who owe back taxes to the state should consider paying them in the next few weeks.

The state is waiving interest and penalties on back taxes, starting Tuesday through Oct. 15.

The amnesty program is available to Kansans who owe individual and business tax debt that accrued before Dec. 31, 2013. The taxes must be repaid in full.

Officials with the Kansas Department of Revenue estimated the tax amnesty program could bring in up to $30 million.

Stephen Koranda file photo

An amnesty program for Kansans behind on their taxes will start next month. The goal is to bring in tax dollars that otherwise the state may not easily collect.

The revenue department has now posted details online and will begin accepting applications Sept. 1.

Kansas Department of Revenue spokeswoman Jeannine Koranda says only tax debt accrued before the end of 2013 is eligible for amnesty.

Ervins Strauhmanis, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas is wrapping up the first month of the new fiscal year on a sour note. The state’s tax receipts in July came in just shy of expectations. Over the month, total tax collections in Kansas were short by just about 1 percent, or nearly $4 million.

401(K) 2012, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas taxpayers who owe personal or business back taxes accrued before December 2013 have the opportunity to clear their debt without having to pay interest and penalties on the amount owed.

The Tax Amnesty Program applies to income, estate, sales, liquor and other taxes. Kansas Department of Revenue spokesperson Jeannine Koranda says taxpayers must have an approved application and pay the debt between September 1 and October 15.

Ervins Strauhmanis, flickr Creative Commons

Kansas is kicking off a new fiscal year Wednesday. The state wrapped up last fiscal year with tax collections coming in $22 million below estimates in June. State lawmakers didn't plan on a big savings account in this new fiscal year, and that makes the monthly revenue numbers critical.

Kansas lawmakers cut taxes several years ago. This year, they raised taxes and made cuts to balance the budget, but those changes still leave a state savings account estimated at under $100 million at the end of our new fiscal year.

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