taxes

Stephen Koranda

The House Tax Committee is considering a plan to raise the sales tax in Kansas to help fill a budget hole. During a hearing on Wednesday, no one spoke in favor of the plan and only one person signed up to speak against the bill. The Kansas Policy Institute opposes the tax increase and says lawmakers should instead consider more budget cuts.

The committee’s chairman, Republican Marvin Kleeb, says raising the state sales tax from 6.15 to 6.5 percent would provide a quicker infusion of cash.

Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

The question of what to do to fix a $400 million budget deficit projected for the state of Kansas next fiscal year is fraught with political peril for officeholders, especially if taxes are increased, which is likely.

Kansas says it collected $4.4 million dollars less in taxes than anticipated this month.

The Department of Revenue said on Thursday that the lower-than-expected collections may be due to how tax returns have been processed since the April 15 filing deadline.

Spokeswoman Jeannine Koranda said the agency can't predict which returns will be processed first.

The state expected to collect nearly $516 million dollars in taxes for the month. Instead, it collected $511.5 million.

Stephen Koranda

The chairman of the House Tax Committee believes lawmakers will need to rely mostly on taxes to fill a hole in the Kansas budget. The state faces a $400 million shortfall next fiscal year. Republican Representative Marvin Kleeb says they’re hoping to avoid cuts to K-12 education, which accounts for half the state budget.

“I don’t think there’s a tremendous amount of expenditure improvement that can happen. We held schools harmless and I think a lot of us feel we made a promise to schools to keep that block grant funding stable for the next two years,” says Kleeb.

Stephen Koranda

A group of state officials and economists will meet on Monday to put together a new estimate of Kansas tax collections.

As Stephen Koranda reports, the information is critical for lawmakers as they build the state budget.

Kansas legislators decided to wait to do the final work on the budget until after their spring break.

Stephen Koranda / File Photo

Twenty-four hours in politics is like a year in ordinary life, when surprising and unexpected happenings occur.

Governor Brownback asserted in his State of the State speech that the “march to zero” on income taxes would continue in Kansas. Twenty-four hours later, the administration announced that this “march” would be slowed.

Two new tax proposals were also announced. One is a 300 percent increase on a pack of cigarettes, from 79 cents to $2.29. The other raises the tax on liquor from eight percent to 12 percent.

A group meeting on Monday will update estimates for Kansas tax collections. The revenue predictions let lawmakers know how much money they have to spend as they write the state budget. Stephen Koranda reports...

The Kansas Consensus Revenue Estimating Group is made up of members of the governor's administration, non-partisan legislative researchers and economists from universities in Kansas. They meet twice per year.

The Kansas Chamber of Commerce says that in the 2014 legislative session, it will push to protect recently-enacted tax cuts.

The organization released a survey Tuesday of businesses in the state, showing that 57 percent of businesses say the taxes they pay are too high.

Former Kansas House Speaker Mike O'Neal is the president and CEO of the Kansas Chamber. He says some businesses may not have felt the impact of recent tax cuts yet.

Legally married same-sex couples are suing the Kansas Department of Revenue over a policy that says they must file separate state tax returns.

State Tax Revenues Miss Expectations In October

Oct 31, 2013

The Kansas Department of Revenue says the state collected nearly $18 million less in taxes than anticipated in October.

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