Transportation

Larry Darling, flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas Highway Patrol is making the rounds in school districts across the state, inspecting school buses and other vehicles that transport students.

Troopers began their vehicle inspections this week and will continue through the first days of school in August.

The goal is to make sure every bus and school vehicle will load, transport and unload students safely. Lt. Adam Winters says troopers check for defects in equipment and mechanical conditions.

Jack Snell, flickr Creative Commons

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Amtrak routes across Kansas and Missouri could keep running under a tentative agreement reached in a dispute over federally required safety systems, officials said Monday.

The rail passenger service had warned it might stop or reroute its Southwest Chief line through Kansas and to end its River Runner service between Kansas City and St. Louis because of disagreements over who would pay to install safety technology designed to prevent traffic accidents caused by human error. The disagreement centered on lines used to route trains through the Kansas City area.

Sean Sandefur

      

The Wichita Area Metropolitan Planning Organization, or WAMPO, is hosting a public meeting Monday to get feedback on its long-range regional transportation plan.

Planner Gloria Jeff says WAMPO is developing a blueprint to guide the next 25 years worth of investment in projects and programs for nearly all forms of transportation.

Amy Delamaide, flickr Creative Commons

City officials say Wichita's bus system will see a decline in service next year without added revenue. KMUW’s Sean Sandefur has more.

The future of Wichita’s operating budget was presented to city council members on Tuesday morning.

Mark Manning, budget officer with the city’s finance department, says future budgets look to be balanced, but that future revenue growth won’t be enough to fill a reduction in transit funding.

Sean Sandefur

Wichita Transit’s Free Fares Week launches next week, running Monday through Saturday. KMUW’s Abigail Wilson has more…

Free Fares Week is designed to give new transit riders the opportunity to experience the public transit system for rides to work, school, errands and recreation.

Wichita Transit provided 58,415 rides during Free Fares Week in 2014. It's estimated that nearly 304,000 private vehicle miles were avoided and more than 400 pounds of ozone forming emissions were kept out of the air.

Sean Sandefur

The brand new terminal at the Wichita Dwight D. Eisenhower National Airport officially opened this morning. Between the last flight at the old terminal and the first flight at the new one, employees closed down food stalls, moved computers and organized a parade of planes to their new gates. KMUW’s Sean Sandefur got a behind the scenes look last night and has this report…

Sean Sandefur

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and Federal Transit Administration (FTA) will participate in a public meeting on Monday, June 8, to review the metropolitan transportation planning process for the Wichita area. KMUW’s Carla Eckels reports…

The meeting gives both agencies the opportunity to jointly review the metropolitan transportation planning process for the Wichita Metropolitan Area. It's also designed to allow Wichitans to give their ideas and feedback.

Deborah Shaar

On Thursday, Mayor Jeff Longwell announced that Wichita Eisenhower National Airport's new terminal is scheduled to open on June 3.

He also mentioned that the new airport parking lot, as well as the rental car center, will be open to the public next Wednesday.

“The new terminal and the addition of the new Parking Garage and Rental Car Center represent a significant improvement for travelers and other customers visiting Eisenhower Airport,” Longwell says.

Jason Tester Guerrilla Futures, flickr Creative Commons

The Kansas Legislature has approved a compromise with the ride-hailing service Uber that should bring the company back to Kansas. As Stephen Koranda reports, the bill is now headed to Governor Sam Brownback for consideration.

Both chambers in the Kansas Legislature easily passed the compromise, which adds background checks for drivers and insurance requirements.

Some lawmakers say similar laws could appear around the country.

UP 8742 Linwood, KS, flickr Creative Commons

Union Pacific says it plans to spend about $120 million this year in Kansas to improve the state's rail infrastructure.

The company announced in a news release Tuesday that it will spend almost $110 million to maintain railroad track. Other expenditures include $2.2 million to improve its signal systems and $7.5 million to maintain or replace bridges in the state.

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