Tyson Foods

Stephen Koranda / Kansas Public Radio

State officials are hoping to keep a new Tyson chicken plant in Kansas after the company put on hold plans to build the $300 million facility in Leavenworth County.

Tyson is looking at other locations in Kansas and other states after public outcry and a local decision to back away from promised incentives.

Stephen Koranda

Editor’s note: This story was updated at 2:25 p.m. Sept. 18.

The Leavenworth County Commission on Monday morning backed off its support for a controversial chicken processing plant, throwing the future of the massive project into doubt.

The commission voted 2-1 to formally rescind a resolution that would have paved the way for $500 million in bonds to be issued for construction of the Tyson Foods plant near the Leavenworth County town of more than 5,000.

Matt Davis / flickr Creative Commons

Kansas lawmakers from the Leavenworth County area will address questions today about a chicken facility planned for outside Tonganoxie. The proposed $320 million Tyson plant could process more than 1 million chickens per week.

Jen Peak is a Tonganoxie resident who’s opposed to the plan. However, she says the meeting will be helpful for anyone interested in the project, which could include people outside Leavenworth County.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service

Tyson Foods Inc. and Kansas officials unveiled plans Tuesday for a $300 million chicken facility outside Tonganoxie, a town about 15 miles northeast of Lawrence. The project will include a hatchery, feed mill and plant capable of processing more than 1 million birds per week.

Doug Ramsey, Tyson’s group president for poultry, said the complex will employ about 1,600 people and will produce trays of chicken sold at grocery stores.

Tyson Foods

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, or PETA, sent a letter to the Finney County, Kansas, attorney’s office Wednesday calling for an investigation into an allegation of animal cruelty involving a steer at Tyson Fresh Meats in Holcomb.

Meatpacking Plant Workers Score Supreme Court Win

Mar 22, 2016
Jill, flickr Creative Commons

Workers at a Midwest meat-packing plant scored a victory for hourly workers at the nation’s highest court today

The workers want meat company Tyson to pay them for the time it takes to put on and take off protective clothing required to do their jobs.

The Supreme Court ruled the employees could use statistical evidence about the process to prove their case, since Tyson failed to keep accurate working records.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited the Tyson Foods plant in Hutchinson for more safety violations.

OSHA labeled the plant a severe violator, meaning future inspections will ensure the violations have been corrected.

OSHA also recommended a $147,000 fine for four violations found during a recent inspection.

A worker's hand was severed in June while he and three others were cleaning a conveyor belt; his arm was pulled into the equipment.

Ammonia Leak Sends Seven To Hospital

May 24, 2013

Seven people have been released from an Emporia hospital after an ammonia leak at the city's Tyson Foods plant.

Emergency workers were sent to the plant on Thursday.

KVOE News in Emporia reports that levels of ammonia at the site were registering at 10 parts per million, which is well below the lethal limit of 300 parts per million.

OSHA says workers can be exposed to a leak of 50 parts per million during an 8-hour shift.