voting

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

The American Civil Liberties Union says Kansas is violating federal law by requiring new voters to prove their citizenship when registering to vote at the DMV.

The ACLU has filed a lawsuit arguing that the state's requirements are blocking people from registering.

Micah Kubic, with the ACLU of Kansas, says they’re asking the court to block the proof-of-citizenship requirement at DMV offices.

Carla Eckels / KMUW

The Sedgwick County Election Office hosted a public demonstration today prospective of new voting equipment that will replace current election machines.

The current voting machines have been in use for 10 years and for security purposes need to be upgraded to newer technology. But Sedgwick County Election Commissioner Tabitha Lehman says the new machines won’t be be put into use until 2017.

Ho John Lee / Flickr

A bill in the Kansas Legislature would allow people to register to vote and cast a ballot the same day, a move supporters say would increase voter turnout but that opponents say raises concerns about fraud.

Same-day registration is allowed in 10 states and the District of Columbia, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Under current Kansas law, voters have to be registered at least 21 days before an election.

Carla Eckels

A judge will hear arguments next month on the request to dismiss the lawsuit filed by a Wichita mathematician who is seeking to audit voting machine results after finding statistical anomalies in election counts.

A hearing has been set for Feb. 18 in Sedgwick County District Court.

Carla Eckels

Secretary of State Kris Kobach is proposing to have Kansas counties audit voting results immediately after the state's primary and general elections.

Kobach outlined a measure Monday that would require all counties to manually audit 1 percent of their election returns, starting with state elections in 2018. The Kansas House Elections Committee agreed to sponsor his proposal as a bill.

The Republican secretary of state said the measure is a response to calls for his office to allow private parties to audit election equipment. He said state law doesn't currently allow it.

Carla Eckels

The top election official in Kansas was dismissed as a defendant from the lawsuit filed by a Wichita mathematician seeking voting machine tapes after finding statistical anomalies in election counts.

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach said in a statement Thursday he was pleased but not surprised. The move leaves Sedgwick County Elections Commissioner Tabitha Lehman, whose office actually has the tapes, as the only defendant in the case.

Sedgwickcounty.org

A mathematician at Wichita State University who wanted to check the accuracy of some Kansas voting machines after finding odd patterns in election returns is finding out how difficult it can be to get government officials to turn over public documents.

Fairfax County, flickr Creative Commons

A Wichita State University mathematician has filed an open records lawsuit seeking the paper tapes from electronic voting machines in Kansas.  

She hopes they will explain statistical anomalies in election returns.

Beth Clarkson is chief statistician for the National Institute for Aviation Research and holds a Ph.D. in statistics.

She sued Secretary of State Kris Kobach and Sedgwick County Elections Commissioner Tabitha Lehman yesterday, and is seeking a court order allowing her to audit the machines.

wikipedia.org

At a town-hall style meeting in Cleveland this past week, President Obama sparked a discussion in which he said that requiring Americans to vote would have a “potentially transformative” effect on the political map of the country.

Carla Eckels / KMUW

People decry low voter turnout in local elections. In the March 3 primary election for Wichita Mayor and City Council candidates, approximately 20,000 individuals-- only 10 percent-- of nearly 200,000 registered voters cast a vote. Wichita now has a population of approximately 382,000, with 286,000 people over 18 years of age who could qualify as a voter. That means about 86,000 people in Wichita who could be voting are not on the voter registration rolls at all.

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