Wichita history

Commentary
5:30 am
Tue April 7, 2015

The McClinton Market Comes Down

The McClinton Market shortly before it came down
Jay Price KMUW

The McClinton Market is gone.

Back in 2011, things seemed more promising when the building at 1205 E 12th Street in Wichita was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. I remember that nomination; I was on the State Historic Sites Board of Review then. It was one of the few surviving early African American owned business buildings in the city.

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Commentary
5:30 am
Tue January 13, 2015

Recognizing A Major Event In Wichita's History

A black granite monument erected in 2007 with names of the victims lost in the Piatt Street Plane Crash.
Credit Carla Eckels / KMUW

This month marks the 50th anniversary of a KC-135 crashing into a predominantly African American neighborhood in northeast Wichita. This was more than just a neighborhood with a particular racial makeup, however. It represented the postwar suburban dream for Wichita’s African American community.

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Commentary
10:57 am
Tue December 2, 2014

How Do We Sell Our City?

Credit vansassa / flickr

The recent controversy with Believable Brands or the efforts of the Visioneering Wichita project a few years ago are part of a recent trend where Wichita leaders bring in outside firms to help the city market itself.

This was not always the case.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Tue July 15, 2014

Happy Birthday, Wichita STATE University!

Fiske Hall is the oldest surviving structure on Wichita State's campus
Credit Fletcher Powell / KMUW

This month is Wichita State University’s 50th birthday!

On July 1, 1964, the University of Wichita officially joined the state university system. It was not an easy journey.

The University of Wichita had been municipal university since the 1920s. By the 1960s, however, many in Wichita believed that the time had come for WU to join the state university system, serving the state, not just one city.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Tue June 3, 2014

The German Influence In Wichita's Early Days

Century II now stands where Wichita founding father "Dutch Bill" Greiffenstein once had his farm.
Credit Kristin Nador / Flickr / Creative Commons

In 1878, the editors of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, a German-language newspaper out of Chicago, visited Wichita and noted that the city’s population was about a third German, among them mayor and Wichita founding father Wilhelm “Dutch Bill” Greiffenstein. The visitors were impressed that there was even a fraternal “Turnverein,” or Turner’s Society, in town.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Past And Present: The Life of a Wichita Intersection

The ghost sign on the former Boston Store near Douglas and Main
Jay Price KMUW

I recently had the privilege to lead two walking tours along Douglas Avenue. Many were amazed at how much the center of Wichita has changed.

A photograph of Douglas and Main from 1870 shows a few wood structures and tents in the middle of a grassy plain. Two years later, according to one recollection, the intersection “clanged with the noisy spurs of Texas cowboys and Mexican ranchmen” and “a brass band played from morning to far into the night on a two-story platform raised over the sidewalk.”

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Commentary
5:00 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Past and Present: Wichita State's Oldest Building

Fiske Hall has served many functions since its dedication in 1906.
Credit Fletcher Powell / KMUW

The oldest surviving structure on Wichita State’s campus, Fiske Hall’s story began in 1904 with a donation from Charlotte Fiske of Massachusetts to construct a new men’s dormitory at what was then Fairmount College.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Past and Present: Illuminating Wichita's African American History

Ron Walters and Carol Parks Haun participated in the 1958 Dockum sit-in with Dr. Galyn Vesey. Photo courtesy Carla Eckels

Dr. Galyn Vesey is a unique individual in the context of Wichita history. Vesey received his Ph.D. from Syracuse University and his academic career included stints at Utica College and Alabama A & M University. He not only represents “living history” but also seeks, as a scholar, to re-create an important part of Wichita’s African American historical experience.

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Commentary
5:00 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Book Review: The Chaperone

One beautiful thing about reading is the travel it allows. Through books, you can visit other times, places, or even dimensions.

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Commentary
12:30 pm
Wed March 20, 2013

Past and Present: Dunbar Theater

Credit Fletcher Powell / KMUW

Kudos are in order for Wichita’s James Arbertha and the Power Community Development Corporation for their long standing efforts to renovate the historic Dunbar Theater at 10th and Cleveland.

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